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THE CAxXADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



i 



Westinghouse Motors 



For nine Work 

Thoroughly reliable, highly efficient, simple to operate 
and easy to maintain. Every part is proportioned to 
its duty, and the ratings are honest and conservative. 

For driving Pumps, Hoists, Air Compressors, Blowers, 
etc. For light or heavy work, continuous or intermit- 
tent service. 




Westinghouse Iiuluction Motor driving Denver Engineering Works Hoist 

Canadian Westing^house Co., Limited 

General Office and Works: HAMILTON, ONT. 

For particulars address nearest office 

Lawlor Bids., Kinn and Yonne Sts. Sovereign Baak of Canada Bldg. 

Toronto Hamilton Hontreal 

152 Hastiti|t<4 Street 922-923 I tiion Batik Bldg. •34 GranviUe Street 

Vancouver Winnipeg Halifax 




DIAMOND DRILLS 

Our Drills are of the latest design and represent the 
highest point of perfection yet reached. Operated by 
■ hand power, horse power, steam, air, and electricity. 
Send for Catalogue. 

STANDARD DIAMAND DRILL CO. 

Chamber of Commepee Building, Chicago, U.S.A. 



ii 



THE CANADIAN MlNlN(i IIEVJKW. 



Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co. 

LIMITED. 

PROPRIETORS, MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF 

Sydney Mines Bituminous Goal 

Unexcelled Fuel for Steamships and Locomotives, 
Manufactories, Rolling Mills, Forges, Glass Works, 
Brick and Lime Burning, Coke, Gas Works, and 
for the Manufacture of Steel, Iron, etc. : : : : 

COLLIERIES AT SYDNEY MINES, CAPE BRETON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

HAMMERED AND ROLLED STEEL 

FOR MINING PURPOSES 

Pit Rails, Tee Rails, Edge Rails, Fish Plates, Bevelled Steel Screen bars, Forged 
Steel Stamper Shoes and Dies, Blued Machinery Steel )i' to Diameter, Steel 
Tub Axies Cut to Length, Crow Bar Steel, Wedge Steel, Hammer Steel, Pick 
Steel, Draw bar steel. Forging of all kinds, Bright Compressed Shafting, to 
5" true to 2-IOOO part of one inch. 



A FULL STOCK OF 

MILD FLAT, RIVET-ROUND & ANGLE STEELS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 

Special Attention Paid to Miners' Requirements. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



STEEL WORKS and Head Office: NEW GLASGOW, N.S 



THK CAXADIAX -MIXING REV1E:W. 



in 



COAL 

DOMINION COAL CO., LTD 

GLACE BAY, C.B., CANADA 

MINERS OF 



Y 



BITUMINOUS COALS 

The celebrated "Reserve" 
roal for Household use. 

EARLY OUTPUT 



INTERNATIONAL" GAS GOAL 

And the best steam coal from its 
Collieres on the Phalen seam. 



3,500,000 TONS 




Shipping facilities at Sydney and Louisburg, C.B., of most modem type. Steamers carrying 5,000 tons loaded in twenty- 
four hours. Special attention given to quick loading of sailing vessels, small vessels loaded with quickest despatch. 

BUNKER COAL 

The Dominion Coal Company has provided unsurpassed facilities for bunkering ocean-going steamers with despatch. Specia 
attention given to prompt loading. Steamers of any size are bunkered without detention. 

By improved screening appliances, lump coal for domestic trade is supplied, of superior quality, 
Prices, terms, etc., may be obtained at the offices of the Company. 

ALEXANDER DICK, General Sales Agent, Glace Bay, G.B. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, 112 St. James Street, Montreal, Que, 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, 171 Lower Water Street, HaUfax, N.S. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, Quebec, Que. 

AND FROM THE FOLLOWING AGENTS : 

R. P & W F. STARR, St. John, N.B. J. E. HARLOW, 95 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

PEAKE BROS. & CO., Charlottetown, P.E.I. HARVEY & CO., St. Johns, Newfoundland. 

HULL, BLYTH & CO., 4 Fenchurch Avenue, London, E.C. A. JOHNSON & CO., Stockholm, Sweden. 

G. H. DUGGAN, Third Vice-President. 



IV 



THE CANADIAN MIMING REVIEW. 




RUBBER GOODS 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 

■"OR MINING PURPOSES 

Rubber Belting, Fire Hose. Steam and Air Hose, High Pressure 
Star Red " Sheet Packing, Valve and Piston Packings, Sheave 
and Pulley Fillings, Rubber Bumpers, and Springs, Rubber 
Clothing and Boots, Etc. 



THE MARK OF QUALITY 

When you see this Trade Marl< 
on a Rubber'Article— 

' IT'S RIGHT. 



The Canadian Rdbrer 
Company OF Montreal 

(LIMITED) 

Sales Branches and Warehouses : 

172 Granville St. HALIFAX. N,S. 

Imperial Bank BIdg., MONTREAL, Que. 
Front & Vonge Sts. - TORONTO, Ont. 

WINNIPEG, Man. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



Princess Street 
Cordova Street 




View of Factories, Montreal, Quebec. Floor area, 12 i 



DRUMMOND COAL 

The standard of excellence in Bituminous 
Coal and Coke for Blast Furnaces, Foun- 
dries, Manufacturing and Domestic Use. 

Reliable, Unifofm and Stfictly High Giade 

Shipped from Pictou Harbour, Halifax, 
and all points on Intercolonial Railway 
and connections by the 

Intercolonial Coal 

Mining Co. Limited 

AGENTS: 

HUGH D. MacKENZIE, Halifax. 

DARROW, MANN & CO., Boston. 
CHAS. W. IVES, Pictou. 

ARTHUR E. SCOTT, Quebec. 

HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL, HUE. 



JAS. P. CLEGHORN, 

President. 



D. FORBES AUGUS, 

Secretary -Treasurer. 



The Bank of British North America 



Established in 1836. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter in 1840. 
CAPITAL PAID UP ... . 

RESERVE FUND .... 



$4,866,667 
2,044,000 

LONDON OFFICE: 5 GRACECHUR - HiSTREET, E.C. 

COURT OF DIRECTORS. 
J.H.Brodie M G.C. Glyn H. J. B. Kendall 



J.J. Carter 
H. R. Farrer 
. G. Wallis, Secretary. 



R. H. Glyn 
E. A. Hoare 



F. Lubbock 
Geo. D. Whatman 
W. S. Goldby, Manager. 
HEAD OFFICE IN CANADA, ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL. 

H. Stikeman, Gen. Manager J. Elmsly, Supt. of Branches. 

tl. B. Mackenzie, Inspector. 

BRANCHES IN CANADA: 



Montreal, A. E. Ellis, Loc. Mgr. 

Ontario Quebec 
London Montreal 

Market Sub-bch. " St. Catherine .St. 
Brantford Longueuil (Sub-bch) 

Hamilton Quebec 
Barton St .Sub-bch. Levis (Sub-branch) 
Toronto New Brunswick 

Toronto Junction St. John 



Toronto Junction 
" Stock Yards 
Weston (Sub-bch) 
Midland 
Fenelon Falls 
Bobcaygeon 
Oampbellford 
Kingston 
Ottawa 



St. John, Union St. 
Fredericton 

Nova Scotia 
Halifax 

Manitoba 
Winnipeg 
Brandon 
Res ton 



J. R Ambrose, Sub. Mgr. 

N. W. Territories 
Battleford 
Calgary 
Duck Lake 
Estevan 
Rosthem 
York ton 

British Columbia 
Ashcroft 
Greenwood 
Kaslo 
Rossland 

Trail (Sub-branch) 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Yukon Terr. 
Dawson 



AGENCIES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

New^i'ork (52 Wall St.)— W. Lawson and J. C. Welsh, Agents 

San:Francisco(120SansomeSt.)— H. M.J. McMichaelandA.S Ireland 
Agents. ' 

Chicago— Merchants Loan & Trust Co. 

London Bankers— The Bank of England and Messrs. Glj-n & Co 
Foreign Agents— Liverpool---Bank of Liverpool. Scotland— National 
Bank of Scotland, Liniited, and branches. Ireland— Provincial Bank of 
Ireland, Linuted, and branches; National Bank, Limited, and branches 
.\ustralia— Union Bank of Australia, Ltd. New Zealand — Union Bank of 
Australia, Ltd. India, China and Japan— Mercantile Bank of India Ltd 
West Indies — Colonial Bank. Paris— Credit Lvonnais. Ly6ns— Credit 
Lyonnais. .\gents in Canada for the Colonial Bank, London and West 
Indies. 

«r .'^.^' Ifsues Circular Notes for Travellers available in all parts of the 
World. Drafts on South Africa and West Indies may be obtained at the 
Bank s Branches. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



WALKER BROTHERS (WiGAN) Limited 

WIGAN, ENGL-AND, 




Lai'gest Ail" Compressors in Canada 

are of WALKER BROTHERS (Wigan) LIMITED manufacture. 



THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES HAVE INSTALLED WALKER BROTHERS AIR COMPRESSORS, 
IN CAPACITIES RANGING UP TO 6300 CUBIC FEET OF FREE AIR PER MINUTE, ALL 
OF WHICH ARE PROVIDED WITH WALKER PATENT AIR VALVES. 



Dominion Coal Company Ltd. 
Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. 
Intercolonial Coal Mining Co. Ltd. 



Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company Ltd. 

Belmont Gold Mine Ltd. 

Cape Breton Coal, Iron & Railway Co. Ltd. 



Sole Canadian ^ r~ A ^\ O ^NTT ■_■ ^ O ^» Canada Life Buildin 

Representatives KtAWUV^I\ HKVy I HELKO MONTREAL, P.Q. 



THE CANADIAN 



BY THE LINES OF THE 

Canadian 
Pacific 
Railway 

All important points in Canada and the United 
States can be reached. 

Fast Trains 

To Quebec, the Laurentians, Eastern Town- 
ships, St. John, N.B., Halifax, Boston, Wor- 
cester, Springfield, Mass., New York, Portland, 
Me., and the principal Atlantic Seaside resorts, 
Kawartha Lakes, Toronto, Niagara Falls, De- 
troit, Chicago, Ottawa, the Temiskaming, Mis- 
sissaga,French River, New Ontario, Sault Ste. 
Marie, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Winnipeg and 
the Western Prairies, the Kootenay Mining 
regions, the Mountains of British Columbia — 
unrivalled for scenic grandeur — Vancouver and 
the Pacific Coast. 

Fast Steamship 
Service 

On the Upper Lakes, Owen Sound to Fort 
William, on the inland waters of British Col- 
umbia, on the Pacific Coast to China, Japan, 
Australia, via Honolulu and Suva, and to 
Skagway en route to the Yukon. The fastest 
and most luxuriously furnished steamers be- 
tween Victoria, Vancouver and Seattle, and on 
the Atlantic Ocean between Bristol, London, 
Liverpool, Montreal and Quebec, in summer, 
and St. John in winter. 

Double Daily 
Transcontinental 
Train Service 

During summer months, and Daily Transcon- 
tinental Service during winter months. 

For illustrated pamphlets apply to any Can- 
adian Pacific Railway Agent, or to 

c. E. Mcpherson, c. e. e. ussher, 

General Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent 

West ern Lines, Eastern Lines 

WINNIPEG, Man. MONTREAL. 
ROBERT KERR, 

Passenger Traffic Manager, 

MONTREAL. 



MINING REVIEW. 



SCHOOL OF MINING 

AFFILIATED TO 
QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY 

Kingston, Ontario 



THE FOLLOWING COURSES ARE OFFERED 

1 Three Years' Course for a Diploma in 
(a) Mining Engineering and Metallurgy. 
(6) Chemistry and Mineralogy. 

(c) Mineralogy and Geology. 

(d) Chemical Engineering. 

(e) Civil Engineering. 

(/) Mechanical Engineering. 

(g) Electrical Engineering. 

(h) Biology and Public Health, and 

2. Four Years' Course for a Degree (B.Sc.) in 

the same. 

3 . Courses in Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geol- 

ogy for degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

For futher information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

4. Post-Graduate Course for the Degree of 

Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) 

For further information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

rflHE SCHOOL is provided with well equipped 
J- laboratories for the study of Chemical Analysis. 
Assaying, Blow-piping, Mineralogy, Petrography and 
Drawing. It has also a well equipped Mechanical 
Laboratory. The Engineering Building is provided 
with modern appUances for the study of mechanical 
and electrical engineering. The Mineralogy, Geology 
and Physics Building offers the best facilities for the 
theoretical and practical study of those subjects. 
The Mining Laboratory has been remodelled at a cost 
of some $12,000, and the operations of crushing, 
cyaniding, etc., can be "studied on a large scale. 

The school is prepared to make a limited number 
of mill runs on gold ores in lots of 2 to 20 tons during 
the months of September, October and November, 
and will undertake concentrating test on large lots of 
ore from December to March. 

For Calendar of the School and 
further information apply to 

The Secretary, School of Mining, 
Kingston, Ont. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



vu 



John A. Roebling'S Sons Company 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



OF NEW YORK 



HIGHEST GRADE WIRE ROPE 

OF ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



ELECTRICAL WIRES OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 







117-121 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



NEW YORK 



STANLEY 

kRGEST NANUFACTURERS OF SURVEYING AND DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS IN THE WORLD. MAKERS TO 
THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. 




> 



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(A 



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O 
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(/) 
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LJ 
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d: 
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CD 
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TELESCOPE ON TOP 



TELESCOPE AT SIDE 



For vertical sighting it is also most useful and accurate, as by trans- 
ferring the lines of both positions of auxiliary, two lines at right angles to 
each other are transferred down a shaft which, if produced, will intersect 
each other exactly under the centre of the instrument, and no allowance 
or calculation whatever has to be made to ascertain the centre. 



Price List post free. 



Cablegrams: "TURNSTILE, LONDON.' 



Great Turnstile, HOLBORN, LONDON, 
ENGLAND. 




G.L.BERGER&SONS 

37 William Street 
BOSTON, Mass. 

Successors to BVl-P & BERGER. 

SPSCIAI<TIES : 
Standard Instruments and 
Appliances for 

Mining, Subway, 
Sewer, Tunnel, 



ANn ALL KINDS OF 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



Underground Work. 



GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM 



BETWEEN 



THE SHORT FAVORITE ROUTE 

_ Ottawa and Montreal. 

Sunday Train Both Directions 
PULLMAN BUFF PARLOR CARS 

r.„'rsTr.,., ouebec, Halifax, Portland 

And all Points EAST and SOUTH. 

Iz^Tb:::... Ottawa, new york and boston 

And all NEW ENGLAND POINTS. 

Through Buffet Sleeping Cars betweer\ Ottawa and f<ew York. 

Baggage checked to all points and passed by customs in transit. 
For tickets, time tables and information, apply to nearest ticket agent of 
this company or connecting lines. 

G. T. Bell, Gen'l Pass, and Ticket Agent. 



Vlll 



The JOHN McDOUGALL Caledonian Iron Works Go. Limited. 



MONTREAL. 




PATENTED 

EIGHT INCH, TWO 
STAGE TURBINE. 



Belt driven from a Water Wheel 
and used for Placer Mining, 
Capacity 1,750 gallons permi- 
nute against 170 feet head. 



H.nc r "'.^""f^'^t"''^ fie and on order PUMPS and PUMPING ENGINES for liquids, air and gas • Con- 
?nntrn l' f^f 17^^%^^^ Other apparatus and machinery under all Canadian Letters & Patent ownk and 
controlled by the International Steam Pump Co. and its Companies, including the following Patents - 



47168 62005 74319 76519 
52155 70612 75069 76520 
53629 73076 75359 77066 



77655 
79001 
80482 



81034 
82040 
82041 



84108 
84109 
86288 



86516 
86517 
89241 



89242 



SGHQOL OF PRACTICAL SCIENCE 

TORONTO 

Established ----- 1878 

THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 




Departments op Instruction : 

1— Civil Engineering. 4— Architecture. 

2— Mining Engineering. 5— Analytical and Applied 

3 — Mechanical and Electrical Chemi.stry. 

Engineering. 6— Chemical Engineering. 
Special attention is directed to the facilities possessed by the school 
for giving instruction in Mining Engineering. 

Laboratories: 

1 — Chemical. 3— Milling and 4— Steam. 6 — Electrical 

2— Assaying Ore Treatment 5— Meteorological 7— Testing. 

A Calendar giving full information, and including a list showing the 
positions held by graduates, sent on application. 

A. T. LAING, Registrar. 



CANADIAN MINING INSTITUTE 

Incorporated by Act of Parliament 1898. 

AIMS AND OBJECTS. 

(A) To promote the Arts and Sciences connected with the 
economical production of valuable minerals and metals by 
means of meetings for the reading and discussion of technical 
papers, and the subsequent distribution of such information as 
may be gamed through the medium of publications. 

(B) The establishment of a central reference library and a 
headquarters for the purpose of this organization. 

(C) To take concerted action upon such matters as affect 
the mining and metallurgical industries of the Dominion of Canada. 

(D) To encourage and promote these industries by all law- 
lui and honourable means. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members shall be persons engaged in the direction and 
operation of mines and metallurgical works, mining engineers 
geologists, metaUurgists, or chemists, and such other persons as 
the Council may see fit to elect. 

Student Members shall include persons who are qualifying 
themselves for the profession of mining or metallurgical enginew- 
ing students in pure and applied science in any technical school 
in the Dominion, and such other persons, up to the age of 25 
years, who shall be engaged as apprentices or assistants in mining 
metallurgical or geological work, or who may desire to participate 
in the benefits of the meetings, library and publications of the 
Institute. Student members shall be eligible for election as 
Members ofter the age of 25 years. 

SUBSCRIPTION. 

Member's yearly, subscription $io 00 

Student Member's do _ [ 2 00 

POBLICATIONS. 

Vol. I 1898, 66 PP . out of print Vol. V. 1902, 700 pd bound 

Vo . II 1899, 285 pp., bound red cloth Vol. VI. 1903. 520 np bo.?nd 

Vo ■ V 'iqT'IT," P"- bo""i '•"d '''"•h Vol. VII, 1904, SSo'^p'^p'., bound. 
Vol. IV, 1901, 33.3 pp., bound. 

Membership in the Canadian Mining Institute is open to 
everyone interested in promoting the profession and industry of 
mining without qualification or restrictions. 

Forms of application for membership, and copies of the 
Journal of the Institute, etc., may be obtained upon application to 

H. MORTIMER-LAMB, Secretary, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



ix 



FLORY MOISTING ENGINES 

STEIAM AND EILEICTRIC 

Are designed for " STRENUOUS " duty. In Mines, Quarries, 
and the various requirement^ for Contractors : Pile Driving, 
Bridge Building, and general Hoisting purposes 

The FLORY TRAMWAY and CABLEWAY SYSIEM is unequalled 

Slate Mining and 
Working Machinery. 

SALES AGENTS : 

I. MATHESON i CO., 

New Glasgow; N. S 

W H C MUSSEN & CO.; 

Montreal. 

' S. Flory Mfg. Co. 





ASK FOR OUR CATALOGUES. 



Office and Works: BANGOR, Pa, U.S./>, 



UNITED STATES 



STEEL PRODUCTS EXPORT CO. 



NEW YORK: Battery Park Bidg. MONTREAL! Bank of Ottawa Bidg. 

IRON AND STEEL WIRE ROPE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

wire: rore: tramwavs 

AND 

cable: hoist-conveyors 
RUBBER AND PAPER INSULATED COPPER WIRE AND CABLES 

WRITE FOR OUR CATALOGUES 




MORRIS MACHINE WORKS 

BALDWINSVILLE, N.Y. 

Centrifugral Pumping: Machinery for 
Various industrial Purposes. 

We are building a special solid steel lined 
pump for handling tailings or slimes in gold 
mining. Estimates furnished upon applica- 
tion for pumping outfits for special purposes. 
Write for catalogue. 

New York office— 39-41 Cortlandt St. 

AGENCIES 

Henion & Hubbell, 61-69 North Jefferson Street, Chicago, 111. 
Harron, Rickard & McCone, San Francisco, Cal. ^immerman-Wells-Brown Co.,. Portland Oregon, 

H. W. Petrie, Toronto, Ont. 



X 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Dan'l Smith 

President. 



C. E. Macphebson 
Sec.-Treas. 



©NTARI© POWDER e©. Ltd. 

I 15 Brock Street, KINGSTON, ONT. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

DYNAMITE, EXPLOSIVES 

ELECTRIC BLASTING APPARATUS, FUSE, CAPS, &c. 



For Miners 

PiT-SlNKEBS 



For Quarrymen 
Contractors 



ELECTRIC BLASTINC APPARATUS 




Adapted for Firing all kinds of 
Explosives used in Blasting. 



Victor Electric Platinum Fuses. 

Superior to all others for exploding any mal<e of dynamite or blasting powder. 
Each Fuse Folded separately and packed in neat paper boxes of 50 each. All tested 
and warranted. Single and double strength with any length of wires. 

Blasting Machines. 

The strongest and most powerful machines ever made for Electric Blasting. 
They are especially adapted for submarine blasting, large railroad quarrying, and 
mining works. 

Victor Blasting Machine 

Fires 5 to 8 holes ; weighs 15 lbs.; adapted for prospecting, etc. 

insulated Wires and Tapes, Blasting Caps, Fuse, etc. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 
MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

JAMEIS MACBEITH 8c CO. 

128 Maiden Lane, New York, U.S.A. 




HAMILTON POWDER COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Explosives 

Office : 4 Hospital Street, Montreal. Branch Offices Throughout Canada. 



W. T. RODDEN, Managing Director. J. F. JOHNSON, Secretary-Treasurer. 

STANDARD EXPLOSIVES 



LIMITED 

Manufacturers of High Explosives, and Dealers 
in Blasting Powder, Safety Fuse Detonators, 
Batteries, Electrical Fuses, etc. 



OFFICE: WORKS: 
Board of Trade Building:, Montreal. lie Perrot, near Vaudreuil, P.Q. 



THK CAXAinAX MINING REVIEW. 



xi 



HOW YOU CAN INCREASE 
YOUR ORE VALUES 



If your ore concentrates contain 
iron pyrites, our magnetic Separator 
will extract the iron, thus making the 
concentrates much more valuable. 
Send us a sample of your ore, and 
we will test some gratis. 

We want to send you catalog 
"H" Ask for it. 



United Iron Works 
Company - 

Sprine:f1eld, Mo., U.S.A. 



CHROME STEELWORKS 

I CHROME. N.J. .U.S.A. 

r CfORMrSl-V or IIROOMVN .N.\0 . 



Lon ^e^t Ser-Vice - Most Economical 

I'EH CHROME STEEL 

SHOES AND DIES 

(hydraulic compressed) 
FOR STAMP MILLS 




CANADA SELF- LOCKING CAMS 
TAPPETS: BOSSHEADS 

CAMS SHAFTS: STAMP STEMS 




Send for Illustrated 

Pamphlet 
Chrome Steel Stamp' 

.Mill Parts. 



GEORGE W.MYERS 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAC. 



THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL 

For Reduction of all classes of Ore 




PATENTED THE FOLLOWING COUNTRIES; 

DOMINION OF CANADA 



United States 
Mexico 
New Zealand 
Japan 
Russia 



Great Britain 

South African Colonies 

Ciermany 

New South Wales 

Victoria 



British India 
Tasmania 
Queensland 
South Australia 
West Australia 



A few reasons why the ELSPASS MILL is displacing 
all other crushers : 

Practically no slimes ; more lineal feet screen surface 
than any other mill ; less horse-power to operate than 
any other mill of the same capacity ; cost of erection 
very low ; occupies very little space ; will save your free 
coarse gold in the mill without the use of mercury ; per- 
fect panning motion, die revolving and rollers remaining 
stationary ; 30 to 60 tons of ore treated per day ; costs 
very little for repairs. 



The Elspass Mill. 



Adopted by the U.S. Government and installed in the 
new mint at Denver. 



Liberal Discount to Supply Houses. 



Address for terms and particulars 



CANADA FOUNDRY CO., TORONTD 

Manufactureps for the Canadian Trade. 



THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL AND MFG. CO., 



RUEBLO. 
COLO, U.S.A. 



XI] 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



PUMPING MACHINERY 

FOR MINES AND WATERWORKS 




3 SETS OF GEARED THREE-THROW HORIZONTAL RAM PUMPS 

9 RAMS EACH 10 INS. DIAMETER X 20 INS STROKE. 



Hathorn Davey & Co. Ltd. 



LEEDS, ENGLAND, 



Sole Canadian 
Representatives 



PEACOCK BROTHERS 



Canada Life Building 
MONTREAL. 



ROBERT MEREDITH & CO. 

57 St. Francois Xavier St , MONTREAL 

Stock Brokers. Dealers in Mining and Indus- 
trial Shares. Companies Formed and Floated. 

Private Wire Connection with 

ZIMMERMANN &. FORSHAY, New York. 



ARE YOU CONFRONTED WITH A DIF- 
FICULT ORE-SEPARATING PROBLEM? 

THE WETHERILL MAGNETIC SEPARATING PROCESS 

MAY PROVE THE SOLUTION. 

For information and for Illustrated Phamphlet, apply to 

WETHERILL SEPARATING CO., 52 Broadway, New York. 

GOLD MEDAL awarded at the WORLD'S FAIR, ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Mfg. Agents for Canada, ROBERT GARDNER & SON, Montreal, P Q. 



THE CANADIAN MINING MANUAL 

1 9 O <a 

Everyone connected with Mming in Canada should have a copy. 
This Manual deals with all mining affairs in Canada, and gives 
a list of all the reliable mines throughout the Dominion. 



RRICE S-^.OO 



THE REVIEW PUBLISHING CO. 



171 St. James Street, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xiii 



CROW'S NEST PASS COAL CO. 
LIMITED 

DIRECTORS 

GEORGE A. COX, President. 
ROBERT JAFFRAY, H. M. PELLATT, G. G. S. LINDSEY, 
Vice-Presidents. 
E. R. WOOD, Treasurer. 
G. G. S. LINDSEY, Secretary. 
THOS. WALMSLEY, JAMES MASON, 
FREDERICK NICHOLS, DAVID MORRICE, 
J. D. CHIPMAN, J. A. GEMMILL, WM. FERNIE, 
AND C. C. DALTON. 

HEAD OFFICES TORONTO ONT. 

British Columbia Offices - FERNIE B C. 



BITIMINOIS COALS m COKE 

Mines and Ovens at Coal Creek, Michel and Morris- 
sey, B.C. Present Capacity of Mines, 2,000,000 tons 
of coal per annum Coke Ovens 500,000 tons per annum. 

These coals are of the hisrhest jrrade and (|uality and accord- 
ing to Government analysis, show the highest value for steaming 
purposes. Some of the mines also yield excellent coals for 
domestic purposes. 

We would call attentiou to the superior quality of our 
Michel Blacksmith Coal, suitable for large forgmgs. Can be 
shipped at reasonable prices to all parts of British Columbia, the 
North West Territories and Manitoba. 

This Company also owns the Femie and Morrissey Mines 
townsites, which offer investments in town lots that cannot fail 
to prove productive. 

G. G. S. LINDSEY, Gcii. Manager, 

Femie, B.C. 



LUDWIG NAUEN 

Hamburg", Germany 



CONTINENTAL AGENT AND BUYER FOR 

ASBESTOS CRUDE AND FIBRE ALL GRADES 

Actinolite, Talc, Corundum 
Mica, Molybdenite, 

AND OTHER MINERALS. 



SPRINGHILL COAL 

THE CUMBERLAND RAILWAY & COAL CO. 

Are prepared to deliver this well known 
Steam Coal at all points on the lines of 
G. T. R., C. P. R., and 1. C. Railway. 

Head Office: 107 St. James St., MONTREAL 

ADDRESS, P.O. BOX 396. 



DOMINION BRIDGE CO., LTD., MONTREAL, P.Q. 

BRIDGES 



TURNTABLES. ROOF TRUSSES 
STEEL BUILDINGS 
ELECTRIC and HAND POWER CRANES 
Structural METAL WORK of all kinds 



BEAMS, CHANNELS, ANGLES, PLATES, ETCr IN STOCK 



MILLING AND MINING MACHINERY 

Shafting, Pulleys, Gearing, Hangers, Boilers, Engines, Steam 
Pumps^Chill ed Car Wheels and Car Castings. Brass and Iron 
Castings of Every Description. Light and Heavy Forgings. 



ALEX. FLECK LTD., Ottawa 



XIV 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Directory of Mining Engineers, Cliemists, Assayers, Etc. 



JOHN E. HARDMAN 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER 

ROOM 10 

171 ST. JAMES STREET 
MONTREAL 
MILTON L. HERSEY, M.Sc. 

(McGill) 

Consulting Chemist of the C.P.R. 

Official Assayer Appointed for Province 
OF Quebec. 

146 St. James Street, MONTREAL 

ASSAYS OF ORES. 

Chemical and Physical Tests of all 
Materials. 

mineral properties examined. 
DR. J. T. DONALD 

{Official Analyst to the Dominion Government.) 

ANALYTICAL CHEMIST & ASSAYER 

112 St. Francois-Xavier Street 

MONTREAL. 

Analysis, Assaying, Cement Testing, 
etc. Mining Properties Examined. 

director of laboratories: 
R. H.D. BENN.p.c.s. 

S. DILLON-MILLS, M. Ex. 

SPECIALTIES: 

Minerals of Huronian and Laurentian 
areas. 

Twenty years' exyerience superintending 
furnaces and mines. 

538 Huron Street 
TORONTO - - - - ONTARIO. 

WM. BLAKEMORE 

MINING 
ENGINEER 

Consultation. Reports. D(!velopmont. 

NELSON - B.C. 



FRITZ CIRKEL 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER. 

Twenty years' experience in Explora- 
tory Work' and Mining in Germany, 
Eastern and Central Canada, British 
Columbia and the Pacific States. 

Examination op Mines. 

Office, 80 Stanley St., MONTREAL, Can. 

FRANK B. SMITH, B.Sc. 

CIVIL AND 
MINING ENGINEER 

Certificated Colliery Manager Great 
Britain and British Columbia. 

Reports on Mining Properties. 

CALGARY, ALTA. 



CHARLES BRANDEIS 

A. M. Amer. Inst E.E. — A.M. Can. Soc. C.E. 
Mem. Amer. Electro-Chemical Soc, Etc. 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

Estimates, Plans and Supervision of Hydraulic 
and Steam, Electric Light, Power and Railroad 
Plants. 

Electric equipment of Mines and Electro- 
Chemical Plants. Specifications, Reports, Val- 
uations, etc. 

Long Distance Telephone Main 3256. 
Cable Address: Brandeis-Montreal. 

W. U. Code, Univ-Edition 

62-63 Guardian Building, MONTREAL. 



H. F. E. GAMM, Mem. D.I.A.E. 

Mining Engineer. 

Gen. Manager, Ontario Mining & Smelting Co. 

Mines examined. Mills designed. 
Machinery installed. 

Specialties: Lead, Silver, Copper, Gold. 
Rare Metals Wanted. 

Bannockburn. Ont, 

Rutherford, New Jersey. 

No. 1418 Flatiron Building, N.Y. City. 



J. B. TYRRELL 

Late of the Geological Survey of Canada. 

MINING ENGINEER 
Dawson ------ Yukon. 

Telegraphic Address — Tyrrell, Dawson. 

Code used — Bedford McNeil's. 

F. HILLE 

MINING ENGINEER 

Mines and Mineral Lands examined and 
reported on. Plans and Estimates on 
Concentrating Mills after the Krupp- 
Bilharz system. 

PORT ARTHUR, ONT. 
Canada. 



L. VOGELSTEIN & CO. 

90-96 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 
representing 

ARON HIRSCH & SOHN 
Halberstadt, Germany. 

Copper, Argentiferous and Auriferous Copper 
Ores, Mattes'and Bullion, Lead, Tin, Antimony 
Spelter. 

Copper and Brass Rolling and Tubing Mills 
in Europe. 

AGENTS OP THE 

Delamar Copper Refining Works, 
Carteret, N.J. 

HANBURY A. BUDDEN 

ADVOCATE PATENT AGENT 

NEW YORK LIFE BUILDING, MONTREAL 

CABLE ADDRESS : BREVET, MONTREAL 



A. W. ROBINSON, M. Am. Soc. C.E., M. Am. Soc. M.E. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER 
Dredging Machinery. Plant for Public Works. Gold Dredges. 

14 PHILLIPS SQUARE, MONTREAL, 
CANADA. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XV 




CHEAPEST 

POWER. 

60 % Saving 

in Fuel. 

Suction G.\s 
Producers 
FOR Gas 
Engines. 

1 lb. of Coal per li.p. hour. Cool i to i cent per horse-power 
hour. Built for any capacity required. No boiler or Gas 
Holder retiuired. Automatic Work. Contracts undertaken for 
complete Power Plants and results guaranteed. 

DR. OSCAR NAGLE, CHEMICAL ENGINEER 

9(V-9G Wall Street, NEW YORK CITY. 

HENRY BATH & SON, Brokers. 



LONDON, LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA 

METALS, MATTES, ETC. 



. All description 
of 

Warehouses LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA 
Warrants issued under their Special Act of Parliament. 



NITRATE OF SODA 



BATHOTA. LONDON 



OLDEST EXPERTS IN 

Molybdenite, 
•<5, \ Scheelite, 



Wolframite, 
Chrome Ore, 



Tale, 
Mica, 
Barytes, 
Graphite, 
Blende, 
Corundum, 
Fluorspar, 
Feldspar. 



'V 'tp Nickel Ore, 




obalt Ore, 
Cerium, and 
all Ores 
and 
. -v Minerals. 



LARGEST BUYERS, 
BEST FIGURES, 
ADVANCES ON SHIPMENTS, 
GORRESPONOENGE SOLICITED 



Cables— Bl.ukHcll, Liverp>x>l. ABC 
Code. Mort'in^ & \eal. Mining and 
General Code, Licber's Code and Mul- 
Icr's Code, 



ESTABLISHES BY GEO. Q. BLACKWELL, 1869. 



Dr. Goldschmidf s ^iSS 

■■THERMIT" Steel for Repair Work, Welding of 
Street Rails. Shafting and Machinery. 

"TITAN THERMIT" for foundry work. 

"NOVO" AIR HARDENING STEEL 

Twist Drills, Milling Cutters, Blanks. 

High Speed and Durability. 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Sole Agent for Canada, 
334 St. James Street, Moxtreal. 

SADLER & HAWORTH 

TANNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Oak Leather Belting 

Hydraulic and Mechanical Leather 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 

LICENSES TO PROSPECT 

or work Minerals on any of their Lands and Reservations, covering nearly 
a quarter of a million acres in Eastern Ontario, and principally within the 
belt^ containing Iron. Phosphate, Gold, Galena, Plumbago, Mica 
Marble. Building Stone, and other valuable Minerals, are issued by 

The Canada Company, 



For list of lands and terms apply to 
the Company's Inspector and'Agent, 



ANDREW BELL, C.E . D.L S . Etc., ALMONTE, Ont. 



LEIDOUX 8c CO. 



99 JOHN STREET 
NEW YORK 
SAMPLE AND ASSAY ORES AND METALS 

Independent Ore Sampling Works at the Port of New York. OiJy two 
such on the Atlantic seaboard. 

We are not Dealers or Refiners, but receive Consignments. Weigh, Sample 
anil Assay them, selling to the highest bidders, obtaining adyances when 
desired, and the buyers of two continents pay the highest market price, in 
New York Funds, cash against our certificates. 

Mines Examined and Sampled, Also Analyse everything, 

THE COBALT SILVER DISTRICT 

LANDS, MINES AND 
STOCK FOR SALE 

The Coleman Development Co., Ltd. 

(No Personal Liability) Halleybury, P.O. 



NICKEL 

THK CANADIAN COPPER COMPANY. 

NICKEL FOR NICKEL STEEL 

THK ORFORD COPPER COMPANY. 



WRITE US FOR PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices: 43 Exchangee Place, NEW YORK. 



xvi 



THE CANADIAN MINING KEVIEW. 




Patent Automatic Aerial Tramway 



one: maim 



Upper Terminal, Alice Tramway. 



(RIBLET SYSTEM) 

With this system 

can handle 1 600 TO ISIS 
per day. 

COST OF OPERATION : ONE MAN'S WAGES. 
More Riblet Tramways built last year than all others combined. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES AND SPECIFICATIONS. 

RIBLET TRAMWAY CO. 

SPOKANE, WASH., U S.A. NELSON, B.C., CANADA 



H 



BENNETT FUSE 



CROWN 




BRAND 



Manufactured by 



WILLIAM BENNETT, SONS & GO. 

Camborne, Cornwall, 
Eno land 



CANADIAN OFFICE: 

BENNETT FUSE CO., YATES ST., 

VICTORIA, B.C. 

AND AGENCIES 
THROUGHOUT 
THE DOMINION 




CORRUC/yTED 

METALLIC 

PACKING 

for joints of any 
Size or Shape 

Newton & 
Nicholson 

TVNE DOCK 

CORRUGATED 

METALLIC 

PACKING 

WORKS; 

South 
Shields, 

ENGLAND.^ 

Telet!;raqhic 
Address : 

"CORRUGATE," 
Tyne Dock. 



Wanted to Purchase 

Persons having copies for sale of Volume I 
of the Proceedings of the Federated Canadian 
Mining Institute, and of Vols. I, II, III and 
IV of the Proceedings of the Canadian Min- 
ing Institute, will confer a favor by com- 
municating with the Secretary, 

877 Dorchester Street, 

MONTREAL. 




CRUSHING ROLLS 

COARSE CRUSHING FINE CRUSHING 

BUI_UEXIIM SIS. 



GEAR DRIVEN 



BELT DRIVEN 



TheJenckes Machine Go. Limited 

SHERBROOKE, QUE. 




THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xvii 




SULLIVAN COAL CUTTERS 




One of 600 Sullivan " Punchers " used by one 
Pennsylvania company. 



Air Pick Machines 

have positive valve motion, securing slow, heavy 
stroke, powerful recovery, and ease of operation. 

For 4i to 6 ft. cut. 
For low or high coal. 
•For any air pressure. 

Catalogue 48- D. 



1/ 




Chain Electric Cutters 



for room and pillar mines, 

make a continuous cut across the whole face under their own power, 
without changing jacks or moving props. These machines have 
greater cutting capacity than any other manufactured for room 
and pillar work. 

Bulletin 48-B. 



ROCK DRILLS 



^^^^^^ 



AIR COMPRESSORS 



DIAMOND DRILLS 



XVll) 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



JEFFREY 
niNINQ MACHINERY 




CATALOGUES FREE ON 

THE JEFFREY MFG. COMPANY, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A. 

BRAIMCHES: 

NEW YOItK, CHICAGO, PnTSBURG, DENVER, KNOXVILLE, CHARLESTON W V, 
C.n..,.„ .,e„.s-.. ». W,LU.»S «.CH,«E„ CO., ,0»0«,0. WILLI.MS . W,LSO,, MO«T»E,L. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 

A FINE STEAM PLANT 




"I will say without qualification that it is as fine a boiler and 
engine plant as I have ever had the pleasure of seeing for its 
size. The engine was working without heating, and absolutely 
without any noise. I wish to congratulate you on your success 
in building this class of engine, and hope that we may have 
pleasure in dealing with you again." 

The above refers to a 350 horse power Robb- Armstrong Corliss 
Engine and two 175 horse power Robb-Mumford Boilers in- 
stalled by us. 



ROBB ENGINEERING CO., Ltd., amherst, n.s. 

AGELNTS 

WILLIAM McKAY, 320 <»ssingtoii Avenue, Toronto. 

WAT*»OX JACK *& COMPAIVY, Bell Telephone Building, Montreal. 

J. F. POBTEK, 355 Carlton Street, Winnipeg. 



XX 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



RAND COMPRESSORS 




FIRST HALF CLASS " B " AIR COMPRESSOR. 



When a small initial load is likely to increase, we recommend 
the mstallation of the first half of a compressor, as above. 

The second half can be added at any time when the com- 
pressor can be compounded on the steam end, on the air end 
or made compound steam and compound air, or duplicate 
ot the first half may be added, making it plain duplex. 

CATALOGUE ON REQUEST. 



Eastern Branches 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

MONTREAL 

WORKS n n E 

SHERBROOKE.QUE. H*''-- 


Western Branches 


TORONTO.ONT. 

HALIFAX.N.S. 
STJOHNSNM 


ROSSLAND.B.C. 
VANCOUVER.BC. 
RATPORTACE.ONT. 



THE CANADIAN .MINING REVIEW. 



XXI 



ALLIS-CHALMERS-BULLOCK 



LIMITED 




DOUBLE LIFT GOLD DREDGE 



THIS is a view or a double lilt Gold Dredge with long sluice-box built for The Bonanza Basin Gold 
Mining Co. This form of dredge is specially adapted to handle gravel with reasonably coarse gold 
or the kind commonly found in placer ground. See Bulletin N'o. 1400. 



COMPLETE MINING PLANTS 



Works ; MONTREAL - Branch Offices : Halifax, Toronto, Winnipeg, nelson, Vancouver. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



PROSPECTING PLANTS. 



3 Stamp Mills; Cyanide Plants; Huntington Mills etc 
can be supplied in sections of a very low weight limit 
tor transportation by man, dog-team or canoe. 

COMPRESSORS & BLOWING ENGINES. 

Fraser & Chalmers, Ltd., make a specialty of Compressor 
and Blowing Engines of the very largest capacity, with 
the Gutermuth Patent Valves. 

WINDING ENGINES FOR DEEP MINES. 

The best Winding Engines working on the deepest Mines 
m bouth Africa are those built by Eraser & Chalmers Ltd 

FIMSEII k 




Limited, of England. 
Catalogues and quotations free from 
W. STANLEY LECKY ROCHUSSEN & COLLIS 



P.O. Box 622, Montreal. 



Yates St., Victoria, B.C. 




Assayers' Supplies 

CHEMICAL 2 
APPARATUS 

Piospsctois' Oulfits Fine Gmuh 
Miners' Outfits Heavi Ctiemicals 

Correspondence invited. Prompt Deliveries. 

The Chemist & Surgeons 
Supply Co. Ltd. 




32 McGill College Avenue, 
MONTREAL. 



CHEMICAL AND 
ASSAY APPARATUS 

ZINC, CYAN IDE and SULPHURIC 
ACID for CYANIDE PROCESS 

Complete Assay Outfits 

The Hamilton-Merrit Prospector's Outfits 
Becker's Balances and Weights Battersea Crucibles and Muff 
Hoskins' Gasoline Furnaces Kawalier's Bohemian Glassware 

Munktell's Swedish Filters 

LYMAN, SONS & COMPANY 

Our Catalogue on Application 
380, 382, 384 & 386 ST. PAUL STREET. MONTREAL. 





Wl 



All kinds and sizes and for all Purposes, 
and Lang's Patent Lay 



Standard 



PRICES RIGHT. 

ROPE FITTINGS 



The B. Greening Wire Co., 

LTON. Ont. ^ ^w., 



HAMILTON, Ont 



PROMT SHIPMENTS. 
ROPE GREASE • 

Limited 

MONTREAL, Que. 




STEAM 

BOILERS 

Horizontal, Upright, Portable, Loco- 
motive, Return Tube, Tubular, 
Smoke Stacks, Stand Pipes, Water 
Towers, Rivetted Steel Plate work 
of every description. 



CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY LIMI 



Head Office and Works: 
TORONTO, Ont 



District Offices— Montreal, Halifax, 
Winnipeg, Vancouver, Rossland, 



TEID. 

Ottawa, 
Calgary. 



24th YEAR OF PUBLICATION 




EstzJjIishcd 1882 




THE OLDEST AND ONLY OFFICIAL MINING JOURNAL PUBLISHED IN CANADA 
Edited by H. MORTIMER-LAMB. 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 



( Editorial Office: 171 St. James St., MONTREAL. 
I Office of Publication : 250 Wellington St , OTTAWA 



VOL. XXVI— No. 1 



MONTREAL, JANUARY, 1906. 



$3.00 per year 
25 cents per copy 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Published by THE REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

Limited, P.O. Box 2187, Montreal, Canada. 
Address all communications as above. 

Subscription, payable in advance, $3 00 per year, including 
postage. 

The REVIEW'S columns are always open for the discussion 
of questions cognate to the mining industry. 

Advertising copy must reach the REVIEW OFFICE not 
later than the 2Sth of the month precedirtfe publication 
to secure insertion in next issue. 

Advertising rates on application. 



have also been arranged for hotel accommodation at 
the famous Chateau Frontenac. We also learn that 
an excelleiU programme is assured. Meanwhile a 
number of important paj^ers have already been sent in, 
and are now in the hands of the printer. These will 
be distributed in advance of the meeting m order to 
give members vmable to attend an opportunity to 
participate in the discussion by submitting their views 
in writ ins:. 



CONTENTS. 

Editorial Comment 
Editorials: — 

\ Proposed U.S. Department of .Mines 

MininK Frauds and State Interference 

Iron Ore Supplies 

19t).5-6 ; • i - , . 

The Deep Shafts of the World 

Papers: — 

A Lead and Zinc Concentrator 

The Geology of Jell •. ■ • • W,' ■ • ' ■' 

The Cobalt-Nickel and Silver Deposits of Temiskaming. 

The Bearing of tjigineering on Mmine . . . ... ■ . • ■ 

Some Suggested .\mendments to the \ ukon Mining Law. 
Notes on Some Recent E.xperiments 



'AGK. 

1 



Correspondence:— 

The Geological Survey's Reports on Asbestos and Mica 

Recent Mineral Discoveries on Windy Arm 

The .Mining Convention at Toronto 

Briti.*h Columbia Mining in 190.5 



Coal Notes . 

The Geological Society of America 

The World's Production of Coal 

l-ominion Steel Co. in 1905 

Platinum in British Columbia 

Ontario Mining Intelligence. 

Mining in the Kootenays in 1904 

Company Meetings and Reports 

Mining S'otes 

Mining Men and .Affairs 

Company Notes 

Mining Statistics 

Mining Incorporations 

Recent Publications 

Nova Scotia Mining Intelligence 

Metal Market Conditions 

Mining and Industrial Share Market . . . . . 

Industrial Notes ; ■ v: ' ' \' ' 

Recent Mining and Metallurgical Patents. 



9 
1 I 
13 
18 
22 
23 

26 

27 

27 

29 

30 

30 

31 

31 

31 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

36 

37 

37 

38 

38 

38 

39 

39 



We are informed bv the secretary of the Canadian 
Mining Institute that the 1906 Annual Meeting will be 
held on March 7th, in the old historic city of Quebec. 
It is understood that the railway companies have, as 
usual kindlv offered a single fare rate to members and 
others attending the meeting, while special terms 



In the great mineral producing State of Colorado an 
area of over .50 square miles of anthracite coal has been 
found in the north-western county of Routt. A 
reconnaissance survey by officials of the United States 
Geological Survev extended from the Elk River on 
the east to Lay on the west, and from California 
Park on the north to a distance of 30 miles south, 
thus covering some 1,500 square miles. The coal 
beds are of cretaceous age, but have been altered to 
anthracite, or s^mi-anthracite, by the intrusion of 
lava beds between the layers of sandstones and shales. 
The vertical thickness of the coal-bearing strata 
varies from 1,000 to 2,000 feet. The north-eastern 
part of this area, between California Park and the 
Elk River is the one in which the cretaceous coals 
have been changed to anthracite, in other parts of the 
field the bituminous character of the coal is unchanged. 

Advices from .Johannesburg state that the tin in- 
dustry of the Transvaal is making substantial progress, 
and that two corporations there are already preparing 
for the crushing and dressing of the tinstone. In this 
connection some new practice is to be introduced by 
local men. An attempt is to be made to separate the 
cassitterite from the gangue by a dry blast or air 
method. So far as described this pneumatic method 
acts by a suction current, to which the lighter portions 
of the slimes are attracted and drawn out through the 
exhaust, while the heavier particles fall by gravity 
and are collected into one receptacle. Whether the 
dry air process will be a success in its application to 
the tinstone of the Transvaal, is uncertain; the differ- 
ence in specific gravity between the ore and the gangue 
is sufficiently great to anticipate a favourable result, 
but larger scale experiments than have been tried are 
necessary before passing judgment. Our intelligence 
is to the effect that a new crushing plant, with a capa- 
city of 125 tons of material per day of 24 hours, is in 
process of erection. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



We are in receipt, of a little book entitled " N(>vv 
^ ears quotations for the Geolo-ieal Survey " The 
authors name is not stated whic^h is a pity since 
some of the .juotations are wonderfully ap , thoui^h 
in cases just a trifle vitriolic. Here are a few!- 

?^^::^':=E'p::it "^^^ '^'^ ^^'-'^^ ^'-^ 

AW '^"'^ "P«^ S'ory's page?"- 

"""trSu'"-^^^^^^ have oftest 

^***Th;Tf ^1*''''^*°.^"?* health we bought 

desire'" - 

'''*r;'-C:,tP;-P^^^^^^^^ - shall tell i„ a sun.ner's 

M****N / hough every prospect, pleases."— i/ymn. 

M *N.— The neanest floweret of the vale to thee is 
Paracli.se."— (7m7/. "'^ 
M*****s. .Of all tho..e arts in which the wi.se excel 
W*******S ' 'utI '"f ^'^'•P''^- i« writing v.- e\l" ^Sheffield ' 
w .S.— The language.s, especially the dead the 

sciences, and most of all the ahstruse."-A,n Juan. 

A correspondent writing to the Victoria Times ex- 
presses disagreement with some statements purported 
to have been made by Mr. O. T. Switzer, manager o 
the B. A and B. C. Dredging Companies, in a 
rn'^nflK^'-'^-T the disappear- 

The w nS' if^^^^t^l ™"^er from the Atlin district. 
The writer, after referring to Mr. Switzer's allusion to 
the enormous disadvantages at which the individual 

remarks "Tr^°' g^eat distance to bed-rock 
remarks.-- The deepest ground under operation in 
the district IS about sixty feet, and it is bJing worked 
profitably by individuals. Furthermore, this deSh 
IS the exception not the rule. The gradual disappear- 
ance of the individual is due to the^pposition of the 
companies and not because he cannot work the ground 

SiTh th r 1 '^^^'f ^ ^^P«rted as having 

said that the increased gold production in 1905 was 
due to the operation of the large plants. In disproof 
of this an approximate estimate of the gold produced 
during the past two seasons by all compfnies-dredge 

dtln r^^^-'i'^"^-"^ ^"^P^^^d ^ith that prt 
duced by individuals, is given as follows-— 1904 com 
P--„«130,000, individuals, $375,000; 1905. comp^rs" 
$125,000; individuals, $300,000. 



the ' t^ Convention he d in Toronto on Dec.nber 

impoitant principles were concerned, the meetiuLr 
was practically unanimous in its expression of <^ fi f 
On the other hand, a number of resolutions were 
passed that were ,,uite foreign to the objects foT which 
the convention was called, and much time and energy 
was thrown away in more or less u.seless dLu" sion 
on these points. We suppose the Ontario GoTrn- 
mentnotunreasonab y feels that it has already done 
Ses ortt endeavouring to ascerta'ln tlie 

wishes of the mining communities in respect to the 
revision and amendment of the present aw but we 
beheve that much future difficulty and trouble-To 
say nothing of the impetus industry might be expected 

mi.ltT ''"t"""^ ^^^'^^ mining kw- 

might be avoided by the appointment now of a Royal 
Commission to hear evidence, and to finally advife the 

as PoTble tt'" " "'^^^ as neaHy 

as possible the requirements and conditions of the 
Province, and at the same time encourage a^d st mu 
late mimng development. The members of such^ a 
Commission would necessarily be disinteres e 1 mpn 
apart from other qualifications, wht^ Sd enS 
them to serve. The services of such a man as Dr R W 

inv'alC'abfe""^''' ''^"P^^' ^"^'^ ^ connection be 



One of the signs of the times in Canada is the 
prese^ demand for mining machinery and suppl es 
This IS especially the case in British ColumbiV In 
Ltf" ""u f^t^^^'^^ ^^th the Nelson Daily News Mr 
Botterell, the agent m British Columbia of the Allis: 
Chalmers-Bullock Company, stated in this regard 
that his firm are now maintaining four offices m 
Canada, one at Montreal, one at^ Toronto one at 
Winnipeg, and one at Vancouver, and to i^eet the 
increasing demand of the Western country hTve iust 

SoOO a"'" ""T'^^ Vancouver, It a los o 
$250 000. Among the largest orders which this cor 
pora ion have lately received have been some from 
he Granby Company for the Hill Crest Coal Company 

H^ll ' .T'^^' f^ ^^^y Reduction Company a^ 
Hedley, in the Similkameen country; in addition to 

Lmt4T'rtott'T ^^'-^^ 

for the venr^QOfi 'i°PT^°" ^^^^ ^he outlook 

tor the year 1906 is very bright in British Columbia 
and that capital, which hitherto has been lackin? 
now seems to be available in quantities suffi fent to 
enable many promising properties to become pro- 
ductive. We are glad to note this evidence of [n 
creasing prosperity in the mining business. 



The remarkable richne.ss of many of the quartz veins 
m the gold districts of Nova Scotia has excited the 
cupidity of workmen and others ever .since tlie dis- 
covery of these mines in the early sixties - and Deriodi 
cally operators in that province'^are put to thefr wt 
ends to prev^ent the theft of gold quartz and amalgam 
Quite recently the Mining Society' of Nova Scotia dS^ 
cussed the matter and drew up a draft of a Ml to be 
presented to the Legislature of that province for en! 
actment; the object of the bill being that the findinl 
of gold upon the person of any one%ot known to Sf 
connected with the management o a gold property 
should be deemed prima facie evidence of ffi' 
Eariy in December the Waverley Gold Mining & Elec- 
tee Power Go's property, at West Waverlfy N S 

tne mill of this corporation. At the time of the rob 
bery the property was idle, and the mill locked and 
vacant, but about the last of November it waslound 
hat some persons unknown, had broken into the 
m l torn up the plates and removed them from the 
building. Investigation by the chief detectiveTfficer 
of the Province showed that the plates after probably 
having been sweated and scraped by the thieves had 
been sold to a junk shop in Halifax"^ Many attempts 
have been made to trace such thefts to the perpS! 
ors and to have them sentenced under the'^Iaws of 
the Province but with little or no success. The only- 
case m which we can remember such robbery havS 
been detected and the perpetrators properiy punTshed 

Sldham 'to'^'-'^fr ^^^'^^^g «f th? mm in 

Oldham, N S., in the year 1894, when the two thieves 
who were brothers, were convicted and sent to Dor! 
Chester pemtentiary for a period of 3 years. 

We can scarcely congratulate the Le Roi shareholders 
on the action taken at the recent meeting,-eitherTn 
re-e ecting Mr. A. J. McMillan to the Bof;d or in re- 
jecting the amalgamation proposal. But the folly of 
the average English shareholder is proverbial That 
however, IS a matter with which we should have no 
concern, but for the fact that Canadian industry's 
injured by this fool's folly; and all things considered 
we neariy feel like saying that it would be better for 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



3 



this country if Englishmen would keep their money 
at home rather than Canada should get the blame for 
the countless costly mistakes, bad investments, rotten 
management, and general idiocy that has character- 
ised so many English-mining ventures in Ontario and 
British Columbia in recent' years. The Englishman 
is terribly afraid of being "taken in," and probably 
the chief reason — apart from the exploitation hinted 
at by the London press that the meeting was " packed" 
— of the rejection of the resolution favouring amalga- 
mation, was Mr. McMillan's clever recognition of this 
weakness and his successful appeal to the prejudices 
of his audience in insinuations regarding the mac- 
hinations of Canadian interests. How unfair such a 
meeting can be was shown by the fact that one so 
disinterested as Prof. Brock was not allowed to speak, 
but when he attempted to do so his remarks were 
drowned by cries of "sit down, you're a Yankee!" 
It is, however, little use in bewailing spilt milk. The 
scheme, which had it been carried through would un- 
doubtedly have greatly increased the profit-earning 
possibilities of the respective mines, has so far as the 
Le Roi is concerned, fallen through. Mr. McMillan 
is now on top and must enjoy the sensation of having 
kicked away the prop by which he climbed there. It 
is not a particularly bright outlook for Le Roi. 



One of the important exhibits in the mining section 
of the Lewis & Clark Exposition at Portland, Oregon, 
was a model of a new quicksilver furnace, embodying 
an entirely new idea in the distillation of quicksilver 
from cinnabar. The furnace is the invention of Mr. 
W. E. Denis, Manager of the Black Butte quicksilver 
mine, Oregon. The furnace is primarily designed to 
treat low grade ore by volatilization, its inventor 
claims its adaptability to the roasting of other ores 
when needed. The results claimed for the new appar- 
atus are: — first, large capacity for small initial cost; 
second, perfect combustion of the fuel, or organic 
matter of the ore; third, entire elimination of soot in 
the condensers; fourth, complete extraction in one 
process, requiring no treatment of residues; fifth, a 
nearly complete 100% recovery, due to the absence of 
smoke and steam. 

The Denis furnace is fired by gas, the gas being 
generated in a separate producer. The condition of 
the fire is under the direct control of the operator, and 
depends upon the amount of air inlets, the arrange- 
ment and manipulation of which is a part of the patent. 
The gas from the producer is carbon monoxide (CO.), 
which is drawn down and under the grate arch of the 
fire box to a gas holder, from which it is distributed 
to a series of superimposed combustion chanibers, 
arranged on opposite sides of the ore tower. At each 
of the combustion chambers hot air, under control, is 
admitted, and here the carbon monoxide is converted 
into carbon dioxide, or carbonic acid gas, just before 
the gas passes over the cinnabar, thereby effecting 
complete combustion at the point where the heat 
is to be utilized, and occasioning the least loss possible 
from travel and radiation. The ore tower through 
which the pulverized ore is dropped consists of a series 
of superimposed zones, so contrived that the tempera- 
ture of each is under easy regulation and control. The 
stirring of the ore is accomplished by gravity, without 
the use of rabbles, and it is claimed for the apparatus 
that no precipitation of metallic mercury within the 
furnace is possible, and further, that it is impossible 
for any unroasted fines to pass over to the condensers. 

Mr. Denis claims complete extraction of quicksilver 
in four hours roasting, whereas the ordinary type of 
quicksilver furnace requires from 24 to 48 hours. This 



saving of time, as claimed, gives the new furnace six 
times the capacity of the old type furnace, half areas 
being equal. 

The Delaware, Lackawana & Western Railway Com- 
pany have lately been carrying on a most interesting 
series of experiments in the application of electricity 
to the rapid hoisting of water from the Sloan mine, 
near Scranton, Pa. This shaft has a depth of 535 feet 
vertically, and drains all the collieries of the company 
in that particular division; the duty performed by 
the hoist requires the load to be raised to a height of 
550 feet, and the capacity is to be 5,000 gallons a 
minute, or something over 16^ tons of water, 550 feet 
per minute, Including the weight of the rope the 
total load hoisted is over 18 tons, requiring 610 net 
H.P. To handle this large amount of water neces- 
sitated the use of large tanks which, on their part, 
had hitherto required to be operated or controlled by 
hand. The new idea in the experiment is the effort to 
have this hoist work automatically, and the design is 
to be put to the credit of Mr. H. M. Warren, the 
company's electrical engineer. Should the machine 
realize the hope of its builders, the man in atten- 
dance will have nothing to do save to sit by and watch, 
so as to put on brakes in case of any accident or deran- 
gement of apparatus. Owing to electrical difficulties 
it was decided that the hoist to operate these large 
tanks must be provided with a motor running contin- 
uously in one direction, and not reversible. The taek 
of carrying out the mechanical details and providing 
the automatic attachments was confided to the Well- 
man-Seaver-Morgan Company, of Cleveland, and the 
electrical controlling devices were furnished by the 
Electric Controller & Supply Company, also of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. The Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Company 
had already had large experience in using motors and 
hoists operated similarly to this large motor, and the 
method which they had successfully employed on these 
other hoists was adopted for this larger one. The 
mechanism by which this was effected consisted of a 
motor driving a pair of bevelled gears through one 
single bevelled pinion. The bevelled gears run loose 
on a shaft, and are each provided with a Webster, 
Camp & Lane friction clutch, the operating mechanism 
for which is so designed that while both clutches can 
be out at one and the same time, yet only one clutch 
can be thrown in at a time. The mechanical device 
by which the hoist is controlled is somewhat compli- 
cated, depending upon solenoids acting directly on 
both clutch valves and brake valves. If this feat of 
automatism in the operation of the mechanism by 
which the direction is changed as the tank is emptied 
of its load, is successful, it will be the first of its kind 
known to the engineering world, and will necessarily 
be a matter of considerable interest. That the coal 
Company, however, believes in taking all necessary 
precautions against failure is shown by the fact that it 
has installed a huge pump at the bottom of the shaft with 
aacapacity equal to the water seepage of the property. 

While on this matter of the problem of water in 
mines, it may not be out of place to mention the fact 
that the Pennsylvania Coal Company, in order to get 
rid of the water at its Dunmore collieries, is now engag- 
ed in driving a tunnel from the mines to the Lacka- 
wana River, which when completed will drain the 
collieries by gravitation. The task of getting water 
out of deep mines is far more expensive than is usually 
realized by those who have not had actual experience 
in the matter. In some collieries it is necessary to 
pump from 7 or 8 to 14 tons of water for each ton of 
coal raised to the surface, and the expense, not only 



4 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



of the operation, but of the installation of the apjilian- 
ces necessary for this purpose, means such an outlay, 
not only for first cost, but for maintenance and opera- 
tion, that prices of coal are not always so profitable to 
the company as might be imagined from the s'mple 
figures asked. 



Dr. Robt. Bell, Acting Director of the Geological 
Survey, in a letter which we publish in our corres- 
pondence columns, takes exception to the views ex- 
pressed in an editorial paragraph appearing in last 
months issue of the Mining Review, commenting on 
the desirability of greater co-operation between the 
Survey, the Mines Branch of the Department of the 
Interior. We regret exceedingly' if we have un- 
wittingly given Dr. Bell just ground for complaint, 
and it is needless to add that our comment was in 
no sense intended as a reflection on the general work 
of the Survey, members of whose staff, notably Messrs. 
Fletcher and Faribault in Nova Scotia, Dr. Barlow in 
Ontario, Messrs. McEvoy and Brock in British Colum- 
bia, and Mr. McConnell in the Yukon, (to go no further 
back) have done yeomen's service for the mining 
industry. At the same time we can hardly admit 
that the argument advanced by our correspondent is 
such as to incline us to amend in the main our already 
expressed opinions. Dr. Bell states that the com- 
ments regarding the publication of his department, 
and concerning the relations existing between the 
Survey and the Mines Branch, are misleading and un- 
"true. It is certainly a fact that the Survey was the 
first to print reports on the two subjects dealt with 
in the recently issued Mines Branch monographs. 
That this point was not made sufficiently clear in the 
paragraph referred to, may, and doubtless does, 
appear unfair. We, therefore, hasten to make amends. 
But that the relations between the two departments is 
far from cordial, is a fact so generally known that it is 
scarcely a subject for argument. Dr. Bell further re- 
marks that the Mines Branch monograph on Asbestos 
and Mica do not give, and do not profess to give, any 
original information on these subjects. We quite 
agree; and it were absurd to expect otherwise. The 
reports are not original, but descriptive. The infor- 
mation is of the character the investing public requires 
and demands, and which other countries, notably 
Great Britain and the United States, are ready enough 
to accord. Dr. Bell, for example, instances the point 
that the Survey has refrained from publishing details 
of mining machinery and of the cost of mining, on the 
score that mining men may object " to their ideas 
being given away to competitors, while, in respect to 
costs, there is always a fear of supplying unscrupulous 
promoters with powder and shot." So far as we are 
aware there is only one branch of the mining industry 
in Canada in which there is any sort of attempt at 
secrecy regarding the machinery used, and the 
special methods followed by the several operators in 
turning out a marketable product. That is the as- 
bestos industry. It is confined to a limited area, and 
is controlled by a relatively few large undertakings. 
In such a case as this it would, of course, be quite 
proper for the author of a Government report on the 
industry to submit a proof of his description of in- 
dividual properties to owners and request a revision 
before sending the report to press. In fact, such a 
course might well be generally followed. But on the 
subject of costs we fail to see the force of Dr. Bell's 
reasoning. If a Govcrimient report is merely a con- 
glomeration of generalities, what useful purpose can 



it possibly serve.. Before investing in any under- 
taking the capitalist wants to have facts — definite and 
tangible facts — Ijefore him. He requires to be in a 
position to calculate his chances of profit or loss. And 
it is a decided advantage to him to have these facts 
presented in concise and handy form, thus rendering 
largely unnecessary the consultation of many works 
and books of reference bearing on the subject in ques- 
tion. For this reason, too, brief but comprehensive 
summaries of industrial tanditions in foreign countries 
are eminently valuable. 

Apropos of the foregoing we are, of course, aware 
that a Mines Section of the Geological Survey was 
established so long ago as eighteen years, and was 
intended to be the parallel of the Division of Mineral 
Resources of the U.S. Geological Survey. This branch 
of the Geological service is certainly entitled to all 
credit for the pioneer work accomplished, so far under 
very difficult circumstances; for it is evident that 
without a reasonably definite appropriation or grant 
of money, and with an altogether inadequate staff 
it has been a practical impossibility for the officer in 
charge of this Mines Section to afford the pubHc that 
sort of precise information covering so wide a field as 
is demanded. 



A PROPOSED U. S. DEPARTMENT^OF MINES. 



The movement in the United States to secure a 
federal department which shall have charge of the 
mining industry of the country under the direction 
and administration of aresponsible member of the cabinet 
is again gaining force, and Mr. Van Duzer,Congressman, 
of Nevada, has already introduced in Congress a bill 
providing for such a department. The bill enacts 
that there shall be, at the seat of Government, an 
executive department known as the Department of 
Mines and Mining, with a head appointed by the 
President, who shall have a seat in the cabinet and 
shall receive the salary of $8,000.00 per annum. It is 
proposed that this Department of Mines and Mining 
shall have general jurisdiction over all matters per- 
taining to mines and the mining industries, the Geo- 
logical Survey, and in fact over all matters committed 
to any of the Bureaus, departments or branches of the 
public service transferred by this act from other 
executive departments of the Government to the 
Department of Mines and Mining. Also, that there 
shall be in the said Department of Mines and Mining 
a Bureau which shall, under the direction of the 
Secretary thereof, gather, compile and publish infor- 
mation in regard to the same, and disseminate practical 
and useful information concerning the mines, mineral 
resources and minmg industries of the United States; 
that the office of the Director of the Geological Survey 
and the Geological Survey service, and all that relates 
to and pertains to the same, shall be transferred from 
the Department of the Interior to the jurisdiction and 
supervision of the Department of Mines and Mining, 
and the Director of the Geological Survey is hereby 
made the director of the said bureau. Subsequent 
sections refer to the business management of this 
department, obliging the Secretary of the department 
to make an annual report of receipts and expenditures, 
of special investigations and reports required by the 
President, the Senate or the House of Representatives, 
and placing in the Secretary's hands the charge of all 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



5 



buildings and premises, with their Ubraries and con- 
tents, and providing for the issuance of reguUxtions 
for all subordinate officials. The final section of the 
bill provides that the jurisdiction, supervision, manage- 
ment and control of mines, mining lands and mining 
industries, now vested in the Department of the 
Interior, shall be transferred to and invested in the 
Department of Mines and Mining. 

The movement is interesting, inasmuch as it so aptly 
coincides with the suggestions made, three years ago, 
at a meeting of the Canadian Mining Institute for the 
reorganization and better equipment of the Geological 
''Survey of Canada. 



MINING FRAUDS AND STATE INTERFERENCE. 

Among the notable papers read at the meeting of the 
American Mining Congress in El Paso, Texas, during 
November, was one by the State Mineralogist of Cali- 
fornia, Mr. Lewis E. Anbury, on "The prevention of 
mining fraud, by state legislation." Mr. Anbury con- 
siders that the greatly increased attention now paid to 
mining necessitates the enactment of stringent laws to 
protect the investor in mining properties, and thus 
there is a necessity for legislation to that end in the 
mining states of the Union. The familiar prospectus 
of the "fake" mining company, which is successfully 
used to extract money from the pockets of ignorant 
investors, whose cupidity is appealed to by the pos- 
sibility of huge returns from small investments, is 
well described. We wish, however, that we could 
endorse Mr. Anbury's contention that millions of 
dollars of capital are at present passing by the United 
- States and seeking investment in Mexico, South 
America and British possessions. As a matter of fact, 
Canada during the last ten years, in proportion to its 
population, has suffered fully as much from promotion 
frauds as has the United States. Some of Mr. Anbury's 
remarks are, in fact, directly applicable to the Canadian 
situation, the following extract being singularly ap- 
propriate: — "The investor, with no knowledge of 
mining, is not generally able to distinguish the good 
from the bad, and it is useless to tell him of the neces- 
sity for securing expert opinion before investing. He 
listens to the tale of the 'faker' and obtains expert 
advice after he has invested, and when the promise 
made to him has failed to materialize. When he 
realizes the fraud he forever abjures mining and mining 
operators, and loses no opportunity to condemn the 
same." If these words do not correctly describe the 
general attitude of Eastern Canadian capitalists, we 
know of none that will. Mr. Aubury then quotes the 
bill which he introduced at the last session of the 
California State Legislature, and which duly became 
law. The statute reads as follows : — 

"Section 1. — Any superintendent, director, secre- 
tary, manager, agent, or other officer, of any corpora- 
tion formed or existing under the laws of this State, 
or transacting business in the same, and any person 
pretending or holding himself out as such superinten- 
dent, director, secretary, manager, agent, or other 
officer, who shall wilfully subscribe, sign, endorse, 
verify, or otherwise assent to the publication, either 
generally or privately, to the stockholders or other 
persons dealing with such corporation or its stock, 
any untrue or wilfully and fraudulently exaggerated 
report, prospectus, account, statement, of operations, 
values, business, profits, expenditures or prospects, or 
other paper or document intended to produce or give. 



or having a tendency to produce or give, to the shares 
of stock in such corporation a greater value or less 
apparent or market value than they really possess, or 
with the intention of defrauding any particular person 
or persons, or the public, or persons generally, shall 
be deemed guilty of a felony, and on conviction thereof, 
shall be punished by imprisonment in a State prison, 
or a county jail not exceeding two years, or by fine 
not exceeding five thousand dollars, or by both. 

"Section 2. — All acts and parts of acts in conflict 
with this act are hereby repealed." 

Concerning the operation of this law, Mr. Aubury 
admits that the time is too short to report as to its 
full benefits. At the time of its enactment California 
was flooded with mining literature containing the 
usual glaring jnisrepresentations which were printed, 
as usual, in the daily press of the State. Mr. Aubury 
says that since the passage of his bill the prospectus 
has disappeared from the state, and the faker has 
sought fresh fields for exploitation. The State of 
Washington has enacted a similar law to that framed 
by California. 

Mr. Aubury is wise enough to recognize that you 
cannot *make men honest by Act of Parliament, and 
that his suggestions, as to restrainment by state legis- 
lation, may be opposed. He takes the higher standard 
that, while a large number of people with money may 
need the services of guardians, yet the mining in- 
dustry of a country demands, as its due, that the citizens 
of that country should use every means in their power 
to safeguard and elevate legitimate mining. 

While it is improbable that legislation of this 
character will be adopted by the Canadian Provinces 
in which mining is carried on, it is to be hoped that 
some steps will ere long be taken in this country to 
limit the activities of the mine " boomster '' by penalis- 
ing the publication of laying prospectuses and adver- 
tisments 



IRON ORE SUPPLIES. 



In a recent issue, the Iron and Coal Trades Review 
devotes considerable space to a critical editorial com- 
ment on the iron ore resources of the world. In 
this article the conclusion is reached that, the condi- 
tions which at present govern the iron ore supply of 
the world must suffer revolutionary changes within 
the next half-century, and the prediction is made that 
the conditions now obtaining will be profoundly modi- 
fied within only ten years. At this time when the 
consumption of iron ore in the world is greater than 
it has ever been, such an article from an authoritative 
source is of exceptional interest, although attention 
has been repeatedly called of late to the fact that 
known supplies of iron ore are being rapidly exhausted. 
Meanwhile the American Iron and Steel Association, 
in a recent publication by the secretary, Mr. James M. 
Swauk, gives some figures abundantly justifying the 
general tenor of the article to which we have reference. 
For example the present blast furnace capacity of the 
United States alone has now reached the enormous 
figures of 31,465,000 tons, which is greater by nearly 
four million tons than the furnace capacity for 1903, 
as given by the same authority in "The Mineral Re- 
sources of the United States." This huge tonnage is 
more than the world's total production of pig iron ores 
for any one year prior to 1895. Again, whereas the 
actual production of pig iron in the United States in 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




The Hon. J. Prevost, the new Minister of Colonization, Mines and 
Fisheries in the Quebec Government. Mr. Prevost has expressed 
himself as being very desirous of promoting the development and 
welfare of the mining industry in the Province of Quebec. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



7 



the year 1903 amounted to 18 million tons, the month- 
ly production of pig iron at the end of the year 1905 
was at the rate of 26 million tons of "pig" per annum. 

This remarkable increase, (of which we have definite 
figures for the United States,) was not confined to that 
country, but extended also to Germany, Great Britain, 
and the other smaller producers of the world ; e. g. the 
capacity of the German furnaces has now reached be- 
tween 12 and 13 million tons per annum, the capacity 
of Great Britain is put at about 11 million tons, ancl, 
while the Furnace capacity of France, Belgium and 
Austria is not accessible, yet the figures of exports from 
these three countries show that they have increased 
by percentages running from 12 to 15% over the figures 
for 1904. Russia, owing to the war with Japan, has 
suffered in her iron industry as in almost every other 
respect. As our contemporary remarks the situation, 
as regards raw material for supply, " is one to give us 
pause." 

The Iron and Coal Trades Review in a previous issue 
published a Swedish compilation of the unexhausted 
iron ore resources of the world, in which the estimated 
available ore remaining in the whole world was put at 
ten thousand million tons. Let us see how long this 
would last the world at the present figures of increased 
consumption. As the 1903 figures for the w'hole world 
were 101 million tons of ore consumed for a metallic 
production of 46,420,000 tons, the present yearly 
consumption of ore, in the same ratio, would be ap- 
proximately 30 millions of tons more, or, say at the 
yearly rate of at least 130 million tons of ore. Pro- 
vided no increase in ■ consumption was required the 
supply given by the Swedish expert would suffice for 
75 years. Consumption however is not standing still 
but is increasing rapidly and steadily every year, and 
there is reason to believe that it will greatly increase 
in the future, and therefore that, as the London Journal 
suggests " We would seem to be within little more than 
half a century of an absolute iron famine." 

So far as the American continent is concerned, we 
know that in the United States the enormous resources 
of the Lake Superior region, embracing five ranges 
and supplying 70% of the total production of the 
United States, are almost entirely required by home 
furnaces and that there is no surplus for export. In 
Spain, the Bilbao ores have more markets than can 
easily be supplied; Sweden has little or no surplus for 
export, and such new deposits as are opening in other 
parts of the world cannot be considered as prospective 
producers of ore for export for some time yet. It is 
at this point that the resources of the Dominion of 
Canada in respect to iron ore loom up quite largely, 
and are entitled to most serious consideration. The 
present Wabana deposit of Newfoundland is singular 
in that it is the one which is most vigorously worked, 
with the possible exception of the Helen mine, in the 
Michipicoten range, but at other points in Newfound- 
land, and at many points throughout Labrador, large 
but unexploited deposits of iron ore have been noted 
and examined by Mr. A. P. Low, of the Canadian 
Geological Survey, and, from his reports, seem only to 
require exploitation to become very large sources of 
supply. In the new district in the northern part of 
Quebec, lying west of lakes Chibogamoo and Wahkon- 
ichi, magnetic iron ore is a possibihty having already 
been found in small bodies with indications of much 
larger ones. Westerly in Ontario, the Hutton, Ati- 
kokan and Animikie districts, or ranges, are not only 
))eing exploited but are actually producing small quan- 
tities of merchantable ore. For these Ontario ranges 
transportation only requires to be supplied to enable 



them to be important factors in the supply of iron ores. 
Westerly, in British Columbia, the high grade deposits 
at Kitchener and the reported discovery of hematite 
in Cariboo district must be noted, in addition to which 
there are the tidewater deposits of the western side of 
Vancouver Island, near Port Renfrew, the ores of 
Texada Island and the entirely unexploited resources 
of the coast to the north. It is not, we think, optimis- 
tic for Canadians to believe that within their own 
Dominion they have supplies of iron ore sufficient to 
last their own recjuirements for the next 100 years, 
and this without going into the matter of the smaller 
and less pure deposits which are known to exist in 
Cape Breton, portions of Quebec, and the older and 
eastern portions of Ontario, At the present time with 
the large production of high grade ores, many of which 
are Bessemer, in the republic to the soutTi of us, there 
has been no commercial need for the exploitation of 
our iron resources, but with the continued rapid growth 
of Canada which we have witnessed during the last 
ten years, it is only a question of a short time before 
we shall have positive knowledge, not only of the qual- 
ity, but also as to the quantity, of these iron ore de- 
posits. 

Somewhat remarkable imj^rovements in the quality 
and quantity of the reserves at the Helen mine have 
not been made public, but we are in a position to assure 
our readers of the fact that they exist, and that the 
Helen mine alone, apart from any other opening on 
the Michipicoten range, will supply a very large vol- 
ume of ore in the future. On this range (Michipicoten) 
other deposits are known, some of which (the Jose- 
phine) have been partially developed and others have 
no development whatever. 

The reports which have been brought in, during the 
last two seasons, by the Grand Trunk Pacific surveyors, 
have contained numerous references to magnetic at- 
tractions which have rendered the compass useless for 
short distances, and some have contained references 
to large bodies of iron ore, supposedly of the character 
of magnetite. The Swedish compiler, whose figures 
our contemporary has used, in all probability knew 
nothing of the iron ore discoveries of the northern half 
of North America, and while his figures may cause 
temporary consternation amongst the iron masters, 
they cannot be considered inimical to the iron indus- 
tries of the Dominion, whose vast stores of raw material 
are only just beginning to be realized by Canadians 
themselves. 

The last mail brings to our table authentic infor- 
mation concerning the iron ores of Australasia which 
recently have been investigated, in consequence of the 
determination of the government of New South Wales 
to aid the establishment of a steel industry in that 
colony. While Victoria has few, if any beds of iron ore. 
West Australia, South Australia and Tasmania have 
large deposits, sufficient for home consumption for 
more than half a century. 



1905-6. 

The year 1906 opens under peculiarly favourable 
auspices for the mining industry in Canada. For some 
time past evidence has not been lacking of a slow but 
steady rehabilitation — a recovery from the depressing 
reaction of inflation and exuberant boom by which a 
too enthusiastic and optimistic public signifies its 



8 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



awakening realization of important potentialities. A 
boom is often merely a premature estimate of potential 
value. It is misdirected energy, and is responsible 
therefore for much seeming waste. As such it is 
deplorable. There is a sowing of the wind and a reap- 
ing of the whirlwind. The field is strewn with the 
corpses of the slain, and the cries of the wounded call 
aloud for pity and retribution. But just as a decisive 
battle may clear the atmosphere of international 
complications, though it unbalance temporarily the 
equilibrium of trade, so the boom, which it seems every 
mining region of importance in America must some- 
times experience and suffer, is not necessarily an un- 
mixed evil. Given substance, as well as shadow, 
sooner or later some will be found wise enough to 
grasp the substance. While ten dollars may be thrown 
away on wild-cats, the boom will have been responsible 
for the investment of one or tw^) dollars judiciously. 
It has at any rate attracted some capital to the country. 
In time this must tell. The wild-cats are relegated 
to the limbo of wild-cats. They are forgotten in the 
light of better things, and industry which before was 
secondary to speculation, now takes her proper place. 
That is what has taken place, and is still taking place, 
in Canada, and who shall say but that for the Rossland 
boom of 1896, mining in the Kootenays to-day would 
be on so substantial a footing. No doubt the process 
was drastic, the methods quite indefensible, but we 
have nevertheless to consider facts and accept them 
for what they are. 

It is yet rather too early for us to be able to present 
an exact statistical statement of the past year's mining 
operations, but it may be very confidently said that 
with the exception of Yukon results, which show a 
falling off, there has been a general increase in mineral 
production in Canada during 1905. The decrease in 
the Yukon has, however, no special significance as 
indicating the exhaustion of the gold areas, but is 
almost entirely ascribable to a scarcity of water, the 
past season having been an exceptionally dry one. 
The chief features of the year in the Yukon have been 
the inauguration of dredging on a more important 
scale, and the new quartz discoveries and develop- 
ments at Windy Arm, Tagish Lake. 

The mineral production of British Columbia for 
1905 will, it is estimated, have a value of not less than 
twenty-one million dollars, or an increase of three 
million dollars over the returns of the preceding year. 
This estimate appears to us to be well within the mark, 
or even below it. The great gain in B.C. has been 
in copper, silver, lead and zinc production, all of which 
industries have been stimulated by the improved 
market conditions. The year has been specially 
marked by important zinc mining developments, 
and the establishment of reduction works in the 
Province to treat zinc-bearing ores. More mines 
probably were worked on a satisfactory margin of 
profit last year than ever previously, and considerably 
greater aggregate amounts were distributed in the 
form of dividends. 

In consequence of British Columbia's large mineral 
output this year, it claims more than ever to have 
earned the proud title of " the Mineral Province of the 
Dominion." We are not so sure, however, that if 
Ontario cared to challenge for the title shei would not 
make so bad bid for it. It is a well known fact that it 
is easy to juggle with figures to niakc; them tell almost 
any sort of a tak; according to the manner in which 
they are conij)iled. Now the Ontario Bureau of 



M ines has proceeded on the assumption that the 
proper basis for valuation is the wealth of the pro- 
ducts in the highest condition of refinement to which 
they are brought at the mines or works in this Pro- 
vince. Other authorities, however, such as the Geo- 
logical Survey at Ottawa, and the Mines Department 
of British Colu..nbia, compute the values of the output 
at the price of the refined metal. This, as will be ad- 
mitted, makes comparison, between the output .say of 
British Columbia and the output of Ontario very unfair 
to the latter. For instance, Ontario values copper 
at about eight cents per pound in the matte or con- 
centrates, and nickel at about seventeen cents per 
pound in the matte. British Columbia, on the other 
hand, values its copper at the full market value for 
the refined metal, which at the present time is about 
seventeen cents a pound. Lead is also valued in 
British Columbia at the full market price for refined 
lead, while the Geological Survey estimates nickel in the 
matte in Canada as being worth whatever the average 
value of the metal is in the markets of New York 
during the year. The nickel contents of ore and 
matte for 1904 were made up by the Survey at 40 cents 
per pound. On this basis of valuation, the production 
for 1905, not including steel, but including both 
metallic and non-metallic products, will probably 
reach $16,500,000.00 or $17,000,000.00, whUe if the 
British Columbia or the Geological Survey bases were 
adopted the values would be, perhaps $21,000,000.00 
or $22,000,000.00. The figures for 1904, as published 
by the Bureau, show a total value of $11,572,647.00. 
The output of steel in Ontario for 1905 will have a 
value of over $3,000,000.00. The increase is largely 
due to the new source of silver opened up in the Cobalt 
rnines, and to heavy advances in the production of 
nickel, copper and pig-iron. 

In Quebec, the great feature of 1905 was the new 
discoveries in the Chibogamoo district, which is likely 
to become, once transportation facilities are provided, 
one of the rnost important productive areas in Eastern 
Canada. An increase in mineral output will also probably 
be shown to have been made by this province also, and 
we expect in next month's is.sue of the Review to 
publish an authoritative statement in this regard. In 
the Eastern Townships the asbestos industry has en- 
joyed a most prosperous year. 

We publish elsewhere an estimate of mineral pro- 
ductions in Nova Scotia for 1905. It will be noted that 
the coal shipments M^ere the largest on record, and are 
estimated to have reached the considerable value of 
approximately $11,250,000.00. Of almost greater im- 
portance, however, are the important developments 
that have taken place in the iron and steel trade, last 
year having seen inaugurated the rolling of steel rails 
in the province. The works of the two big companies 
have, in fact, been most busily employed filUng orders 
in all departments, and have now sufficient work on 
hand to keep the plants in operation at their full capa- 
cities for some months ahead. Only a slight increase 
in the gold output is anticipated. 

In wishing our readers a prosperous and 
Happy New Year, we feel that there is every pro- 
bability of this being realized in the mining industry. 

Conditions are now more stable than they have been 
for years past; there is little to fear in the way of 
labour troubles or disturbances; industry is becoming 
established on a firm and substantial basis; and new 
and promising territory is being opened up throughout 
the Dominion. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



9 



THE DEEP SHAFTS OF THE WORLD. 



The following table, showing the location, size and 
depth in feet of the principal deep shafts of the world, 
will be of interest to many of our readers. The deepest 
shafts, as will readily be seen, are those in the copper 
region of Michigan, on the Keweenaw Peninsula, with 
the Driefontein Deep shaft in the Rand, S.A. a close 
second: — 

There is no gainsaying the important part elec- 
tricity is now playing in respect to the economies 
of mining. One of the latest Canadian applica- 
tions is that of the Dominion Coal Company, at 
its Dominion No. 2 shaft, where it has been deci- 
ded to install a central station of large size to 
develop electric power in quantity sufficient to 
operate all of the collieries of this Company. As a 
first instalment, ^hree generators of 650 H.P. each, 
will be put into service, their power being distributed 
by wire to the various collieries, doing away with the 
rnaintenance of the individual steam plants at the 
respective collieries. The various pumping stations of 
the company will first be done away with, and the 



pumps will be operated by electricity. ■ The longest 
distance over which power will be transmitted for the 
present will be about 8 miles, to Dominion No. 6. The 
instalment has been decided upon, after extensive 
examination and investigation by Mr. H. F. Parshall, 
an eijiinent London electrical engineer, who reports 
that such favourable conditions for the installation of 
electrical methods do not obtain elsewhere to his 
knowledge. The Dominion Coal Company will be the 
first company in America to install a large scale electric 
plant for the operation of its collieries; while the 
principal collieries of Germany and Belgium now util- 
ize it for central power stations, there are none in the 
Pennsylvania region, which have utilized it to such a 
large extent. The Dominion Coal Company will not 
be alone in this matter of applying electricity for the 
operation of its mines. The Nova Scotia Steel & Coal 
Company, which is preparing to open up a new colliery 
a mile north of the present No. 3 shaft, is also about 
to install a plant to do all pumping, winding and 
ventilating by electricity. In this manner the collieries 
of Cape Breton will be the first in America to utilize 
the electric current for operations on a large scale. 



Name 



Red Jacket 

Tamarack 

Driefontein Deep . 

Ashton Moss . . . . 



Location 



! No. ofi 

Material Cora- Size of Hauling 
Minetl part- Compartment 
ments 



Calumet, Michigan . . . Copper 

Tamarack ^ Copper 

Rand IGold . . 



Manchester Coal 



Con. California and Virginia . . Virginia, Nevada. 

Cadeby Main Yorkshire 

Rose Bridge Wigan 



Dinas Main . . .• South Wales 

Silkstone CoUiepy .'. Sunderland 

Newbattle Edinburgh . . ....... 

Centennial Eureka | Eureka, Utah 

Ontario jPark City, Utah 

Hazleton iHazleton, Pa., U.S.A.. 

No. 5 shaft iWilke's Barre, Penn- 
sylvania, U.S.A. . . . 



.\naconda Butte. Montana. 

Butte and Boston iButte. Montana. 



Silver, gold 

Coal 1 

Coal 



Coal 

Coal 

Coal 

Gold, silver 

Silver 

Anthracite 

Anthracite 

Copper . . . 
Copper ... . 



6 ]6 ft. 3 in. X 7 ft 

5 ft. 2 in. X 5 ft. 2 in. 

7 5 ft. X 6 ft 



Size of Shaft 
over all 



Circular 



5 ft. 4 in. X 4 ft. 6 in. 

Circular 

Circular 



Circular 

Circular 

Circular 

4 ft. 2 in. X 4 ft. 2 in, 

4 ft. 6 in. X. 5 ft 

7 ft. 6 in.x.l2 ft. 6 in. 



5 I7ft.6in.xl2ft.. 



3 4 ft. 6 in. X 5 ft. 
3 l4ft.x4ft.6in. 



2.5 ft. X 1.5 ft. 6 in. . 
29 ft.2in.x8ft.l0in 
42 ft. x 8 ft 



16 ft. diameter . 

lOft.x 7 ft. 8 in. 
16 ft. diameter. 



184 ft. diameter. . . . 
16 ft. 6 in. diameter.. 

20 ft. diameter 

5 ft. 6 in. X 12 ft.8 in. 

7 ft. X 20 ft 

37 ft.x 13 ft. 10 in.. . 



12 ft. X 52 ft 



20 ft. 4 in. X 6 ft. 8 in 
18ft.4in.x6ft.2in. 



Depth 



Feet 



4900 
4615 
2000 
4000 
2880 

2500 
2253 
2446 



1794 
1740 
1658 
1610 
1500 
1150 

1039 



Remarks 



Probably deeper at present 
day. 

Six compartments 6 ft. x 5 ft. 

and one 6 ft. x 6 ft. 6 in. 
Hoi-sts total distance in 1 min. 

25 sees. 
Punipway 5 ft. 4 in. .x 6 ft. 

Max. speed of hauling5,100 
ft. per min., or 57 miles per 
hour. 

.Sunk and walled in 1 6 months 
Hauls 2,000 tons in 8 hours. 
Hauls 2,000 tons in 75 hours. 
Manway 2 ft. 4 in. x 4 ft. 2 in. 

Pumpway 3 ft. x 12 ft. 6 in. 

2 hoistways, pumpway, up- 
cast 12 ft. X 14 ft. 10 in., 
downcast 12 ft. x 12 ft. 



A LEAD AND ZINC CONCENTRATOR AT ROSE- 
BERRY, B.C. 

By Alfred W. Dyer. 
The late successful run of the lead and zinc concen- 
trator at Roseberry, Slocan lake, erected by the 
Monitor and Ajax Fraction Company and treating 
the ore of the Monitor and Bosun groups, has attracted 
some attention, especially in view of the importance 
of the problem, successfully solved, of the present 
zinc commission of enquiry undertaken by the Domin- 
ion Government and of the general advance in the 
price of both spelter and lead. That which has been 
done by this company can be imitated by others as it 
is by no means claimed that the Monitor and Ajax 
has the only properties in the Slocan which are worth 
the working. 

The company's mining properties are the Monitor 
and Ajax groups. The Monitor group, consisting of 
eight claims, is situated at Three Forks on a branch 



line of the Canadian Pacific, the Nakusp and Slocan 
railway. The Bosun has also a total number of eight 
claims and is situated on the east shore of Slocan lake, 
near New Denver. Two claims have been developed 
upon each property. Upon the Monitor a total of 
3,950 feet of development work has been accomplished 
to date. The output has been 3,207 tons of crude 
galena ore for which net smelter returns of $125,268.38 
have been received. In addition to this output about 
3,000 tons of second class ore have been mined which, 
after concentration, is expected to produce about 350 
tons of lead concentrates and 1,500 tons of zinc con- 
centrates. 

On the Bosun the total development measures 4,060 
feet and the output, up to date, is 2,920 tons galena 
and 1,300 tons zinc. The Bosun claims to be the first 
mine in the Slocan to ship zinc profitably to Europe. 
That was antecedent to the present operations. The 
Monitor and Ajax Fraction Company has only 
recently acquired this property. 



10 



THE CANADIAN MJNING REVIEW. 

c 



The company having a large tonnage of second 
class ore on hand which could not be marketed pro- 
fitably, erected a concentrator at Roseberry which 
would also separate the zinc from the lead ore; the 
mill is, therefore, a zinc and lead concentrator. The 
pulverizing machinery consists of one 10 by 20 Blake 
crusher, a Gates crusher and two sets of 14 by 24 rolls. 
The concentration and separation plant is a combina- 
tion of seven four compartmented jigs and sixteen 
vanners. Besides these there are the usual accessories, 
automatic samplers, automatic feeders for the rolls 
and concentrators, trommels, elevators, classifiers, 
tanks, electric light plant, etc. 

The mill is run by water power, the water being 
conveyed to the mill through an 18 inch pipe under a 
head of 376 feet. The power is applied through two 
five foot Pelton wheels. 

The sizing and classifying are done by a combination 
of revolving screens and hydraulic classifiers. 

The flow of ore is "as follows:— The ore is crushed in 
the Blake crusher; is then conveved automatically to 
the Gates crusher, in which it is ground to a finer size; 



fiers that which rema'ns is extremely fine and is run 
into a settling tank, 60 feet long, in such manner as 
to allow of its being classified into 16 sizes, on exactly 
the principle which is shewn on the settling of sedi- 
ment to the bottom at the entrance of a muddy river 
into a placid lake, the coarser particles coming to rest 
first. From the settling tank these fines are treated 
over a system of vanners,' the vanner in use being 
somewhat similar to the Luhrig vanner. Here the 
final concentration of the fines takes place. The over- 
flow of the settling tanks runs over into yet another 
settling tank in order that any possible residue may 
be caught. This residue is sold acc^arding to its value. 
It is impalpable and would run through a 250 mesh. 
The capacity of the mill, under this system, is 90 tons 
daily. 

The products made upon the three classifiers are 
treated upon three jigs. The products of jigs and 
vanners are zinc and lead concentrates, the latter 
being ready for shipment and the former awaits the 
magnetic separator. The value of the zinc is largely 
increased by the separation of iron from it. Iron 




New Zinc Concentrator at Roseberry, B.C. 



IS then passed through a system of three Snider auto- 
matic samplers, one one hundred and twenty fifth part 
of the feed being cut out for assay purposes and then 
falls into a large ore bin. Hence it is fed automatical- 
ly into the set of coarse rolls whence it gravitates into 
the elevator boot and is lifted to the top of the build- 
ing. Here it passes into fom- revolving screens, having 
12 mm, 8 mm, 4 mm and 2^- mm holes respectively. 
Each size passes from the screens, by gravity, into its 
respective set of jiggers; the undersize passing over 
three hydraulic classifiers. Culver patent. 

This latter is a great imi)rovement over former 
classifying systems, the iiarticular feature being a 
cross current of water of regulated force which meets 
the particles descending through the rising jet and 
drives them transversely. After passing tlie classi- 



contents in zinc ore or concentrates are penalized by 
the smelters and, moreover, the separated iron has a 
certain commercial value as a smelter flux, especially 
as it contains good silver and gold values. 

The new feature of the process just described is 
that no tailings are made upon the jigs. Such tailings 
are treated as middlings and are put through again, 
the tailings being thus made upon the vanners. This, 
of course depends upon the mill feed. The concen- 
trates are practically three to two. It is therefore 
possible, without largely increasing the installation 
of machinery to run the tailings as middlings. If 
the mill feed meant a concentrate of 10 to 1, this could 
not be done, unless the milling capacity \v(>re enor- 
mously increased and then the point would remain 
whether the cost of such increase would set off the 
extra gain made. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



11 



In the case under review 960 tons of ore were put 
through the mill, between October 17 and November 
20, resulting in 693 tons of concentrates and 267 tons 
of tailings. Nothing is being done at present as the 
ore dump is frozen up. With the run of the mine 
being used as mill feed and with the magnetic separator 
erected, the company looks forward next season to 
a continuous run. The experiment has been made 
and made successfully, upon the ore dump, without 
any expense being incurred in the way of. mining 
excepting some ore bins being erected at Three Forks 
upon the Monitor end of the holdings of the company. 

The actual test, according to the mill returns, sup- 
plied by manager M. Gintzburger, are as follows: — 

Permuting this return it will be found that the re- 
covery of silver was 89%, that of lead, 73% and that 
of zinc 86^% . The test for gold was not made on the 
mill feed. 

It will be seen by the above figures that the zinc 
concentrates contain 3^%, lead. This lead is not 
marketable when mixed with zinc ore and in such 
small quantities but after magnetic treatment the 
iron separated from the zinc contained from 6 to 7 
per cent, lead and is then paid for by the smelters at 
the usual rate. As the iron contents amount to about 



30% of the total weight of the zinc concentrates, i.e., 
about 160 tons containing, say QWo lead, or about 
20,000 pounds of marketable lead, it follows that the 
actual commercial recovery in lead is 83%. 

Thus a step further will have to be taken in the 
erection of a magnetic separator to take out the iron 
from the zuic. Plans for this plant have already been 
drafted and submitted for approval, the estimated 
cost being about $15,000. It must, however, be under- 
stood in this connection that the recent rise in the 
market price of spelter has altered conditions of mining. 
With spelter at £18 the ton no zinc ore running 40% 
or under was much worth considering. With spelter 
at £28 the case is different. 

There has been some criticism as to the location of 
the present plant but it is explained by the manage- 
ment that the plant was erected in the first instance 
with the view of its being made a customs mill. 
Further the shipping facilit'es are excellent, either by 
boat or rail (C.P.R.) The site and the available water 
power are better at Roseberry than at the Bosun itself, 
which is five miles distant along the lake. Were the 
mill at the Monitor, nine miles away, the Bosun ore 
would have to be taken up hill for nine miles. The 
cost of the mill was $50,000. 



MILL FEED 


GALENA RECOVERY 


ZINC RECOVERY 


ASSAY 


ASSAY 




ASSAY 






Tons 


Agg. oz. 


Pb. % 


Zinc % 


Tons 


Av. 


Agg. oz. 


Pb. % Zinc- 


Tons 


Av. 


Agg. oz. 


Pb.% 


Zinc % 


Fe. 


966t 


20.04 
19362^ oz. 


10.29 
198843 lbs. 


23.7 
457978 lbs. 


156i 


$4.50 


54.4 
8.501 oz. 


46.5 10.3 
145312 If 


537 


$3.60 


16.2 
8699 oz. 


3.5 


368 


15 
395730 



THE GEOLOGY OF JELL.* 



(By Prof. J. F. Kemp). 
It is the custom when we meet at the annual dinner 
to bring up only those subjects which have not been 
mentioned at all or which have been but incompletely 
treated during the regular sessions. I have one to 
present, about which, I think — I may even say I hope 
I —all who hear me know little. In fact I even find it 
difficult to discover an acceptable name for it. I will 
therefore select a pseudonym. One of my old friends 
in college was a very pious individual named Bill 
Gosman. His early training had been so strict that 
he found it difficult in his later years to command a 
suitable vocabulary with which to relieve his emotions 
when they became strong and get a series of terms 
which would not offend his conscience. Finally, 
however, when these occasions arose, he would remark 
with deep feeling. Jam the jam thing to Jell. 

It is of the geology of Jell which I wish to speak to 
you to-night and as I have said I am the only one here 
who knows about it as yet. But impelled by that 
ambition which every scientific man feels to spend 
some time in exploring a new district which no geologist 
had previously seen, and being anxious withal some- 
time ago to have a striking and novel subject to des- 
scribe upon an important occasion like the present, 
*A paper read at the Annual Dinner of the Geological Soc- 
iety, of Canada, Ottawa, December 29th, 1905: 



I spent sometime in this the only district near New 
York which had not previously been exhausted by my 
colleagues, Dr. Clarke, of Albany and Dr, Kimmel in New 
Jersey, There have been several travellers who have visi- 
ted it in the world's history. There was Orpheus who 
went in search of his lost Eurydice. There were 
Ulysses and J^neas, and in later times Dante. Never- 
theless all of these were anything but scientific obser- 
vers and while they brought back in each case 
much that was of great human interest, their references 
to the geology of Jell are of the most meagre character. 
In fact the references are all physiographic rather 
than geologic and relate to plains, rivers, gulches and 
caverns, without telling us whether the plains were wave 
cut terraces, lake-basins or deserts in origin, or whether 
the rivers were at base level or not. Moreover they 
mix up young, mature and old topographic forms in 
a way which shows that no one of them had any real 
grasp of the subject. And as for the geology there 
is almost nothing said. There remains therefore much 
of deep scientific interest to impart about Jell. 

In order to reach Jell you go down to that portion of 
New York called the Tenderloin and then, as has been 
long known, you are right at the entrance. You hunt 
around until you find the mouth or crater of the con- 
duit up through which the Palisade trap reached the 
surface. This is on the east side of the Hudson con- 
trary to general belief, and from it the hot molten 
diabase turned westward, but the old connection was 



12 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



long since destroyed by erosion. At the entrance, 
much as if you were going into a North River tunnel,' 
you provide yourself with an asbestos suit so made 
as to be absolutely a non-conductor. When clad in 
it one can walk without danger amid the most elevated 
temperatures. The secret of its composition is known 
to few, but it was familiar to Shadrack, Mechak and 
Abednego, the three children of Israel who were in 
the fiery furnace many years ago. It was also used 
accordmg to the researches of Professor Pumpelly in 
Anan, when in periods of excessive aridity the sun at 
midday made that town as hot as Jell. Its discovery 
is of the highest importance to one of Canada's leading 
industries. 

The head-piece has small transparent windows of 
mica very much like a stove door out through which 
- one looks without danger. Inside the back of the 
jacket is an apparatus containing liquid air for a cooler 
and as one expires the exhausted oxygen inside the 
suit, the latter is fitted with an outlet valve so con- 
structed as to let only C.O2 pass, since should any 
free oxygen escape there" would be a frightful con- 
flagration under the conditions prevailing in Jell. 

Thus provided and having a topographical map 
ruled in coordinate squares, a note-book, a compilation 
book, an infusible platinum hammer, an inside com- 
pass, an outside asbestos rock-bag and a sack of con- 
densed food, I set out. 

I ought also to mention one other ingenious and 
essential piece of apparatus. My suit was provided 
with two sets of thermergons or heat generators, one 
in front and one behind, each outside the asbestos 
suit. By turning switches one or both would emit 
intense heat rays which would be radiated outward 
and which, as you will see, were necessary to the trip. 
I also had an electric lamp. 

In the easy descent to Avernus at first you pass over 
a coarse macadam or pavement of a soft, tuffaceous 
rock, very much subject to alteration, so that with 
use it loses all stiffness and resistance. It is called 
goodresolutionite and specimens may be even found 
among incompleted manuscripts on the surface 
of the earth. It seems in the local geological 
relations to be a close parallel with the garnet, reserv- 
ianite and andalusite of the contact zones which are 
occasionally exposed to view in the upper world, but 
it extends a long distance, since at present the centre 
of heat is far below the surface. 

After a short descent upon the goodresolutionite I 
met the level of the ground water as would be necessary 
in our local conditions of rainfall. I noted the change 
in the character of the wall-rock at this horizon, but 
did not pause, being keen for the larger problems at 
greater depth. I waded right into the ground water, 
which was of meteoric origin in this case and for which 
I felt less regard than is cherished by some geologists 
Having once gone below its surface a few feet, I tur- 
ned on the switch of my rear thermergon and at once 
heat rays were radiated backward boiling the water 
furiously to steam of pressures only reached at the 
point of dissociation of the hydrogen and oxygen. 
The inevitable result was that I was driven forward 
much as if I had a powerful screw propeller aft. In a 
very short space of time I passed entirely through the 
groundwater zone, which, as everyone knows now is 
comparatively shallow. Mr. John W. Finch, state 
geologist of Colorado, has endeavored to show that it is 
about 1,000 ft. My patent log, which I trailed out 
astern, registered just 1017 feet, which shows the ex- 



treme accuracy of Mr. Finch's estimate. Having 
passed the zone of the groundwater, which I may also 
remark is practically still and moves so little as to be 
of no particular geologic importance, I walked briskly 
downward amid dry rocks, just such as we meet in 
the depths of the Lake Superior copper mines. 

Gradually however I passed to the limit of the zone 
of possible fractures and found the walls of the passage- 
way closing in and the bottom becoming choked with 
the spalls and gob which had scaled off under pressure. 
Moreover the goodresolutionite began to bulge up in 
the floor just as shales and fireclay creep in the entry 
of a coal mine. For fairly tough and resistant rocks 
like our local mica schists and gneisses President Van 
Hise has calculated that the zone of fracture extends 
to a depth of ,8342 . 75 meters. While it is difficult to 
note m a hasty trip at just what point the po.ssible 
fractures end, yet by adding to the records of the patent 
log for the ground water, the depth of the overlying 
vadose region and the records of my pacing survey, 
checked by a pedometer, I found the depth of the 
zone of fracture to be 7979 . 87 meters, or .362 . 88 meters 
say about 1100 feet less than President Van Hise's 
estimate but on the whole corroborating him very well. 

The question may arise in your minds as to how 
I proceeded at all as the zone of fracture ceased, but 
the solution of this difficulty is really quite simple. 
As the rocky walls closed in, I turned on my front 
thermergon at moderate capacity, and my rear one at 
twice this amount. The powerful heat rays melted 
the rocks for the space of a few feet around, and the 
extra heat of the rear thermergon generated from the 
dissolved vapors and occluder gases a preponderating 
pressure a tergo which drove me forward at good speed 
and with small difficulty gradually I traversed the zone 
of mixed fracture and flowage, and finally the zone of 
flowage itself. In the end and after passing 41,387.63 
meters of the latter I suddenly shot out into an open 
space and found myself standing upon the pyroclastics 
which at this point formed the floor of Jell. 

You may raise the question as to the possibility of 
an open space below the zone of flowage, but it strictly 
follows from physical principles. The zone of fracture 
ceases because the pressure is so great that cavities 
are impossible. The rock is squeezed together and 
compacted as tightly as matter can be. As one pene- 
trates the zone of flowage the matter reaches a point 
when it cannot be compacted further, and it attains 
the property of absolute resistance. Below this sur- 
face which is roughly spherical there lies the region 
of rio strain, and it is a matter consequently of physical 
indifference whether the central space is hollow or is 
filled. 

As I found myself upon the pyroclastics which at 
this point form the floor of Jell. I shut off my ther- 
mergons, and in the clear though not bright unearthy 
radiance that diffused itself everywhere I sought to 
examine my surroundings. The cavern was a passage- 
way of moderate size which led on to more highly 
illumed regions beyond. The location was Jell quad- 
rangle, northeast corner, outcrop, igneous and appar- ■ 
ently basaltic in nature. Proceeding 721 meters along 
the passage I found a dike of a lencocratic phyrocrys- 
talline jellynose— striking N.E.— and after that uni- 
form granitoid walls of gehennose, which constitutes 
the main country rock. So far as my wanderings took 
me in Jell this was the solid rock and it varied only in 
that moderate differentiation had produced a greater 
or less abundance of the several constituent minerals. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



13 



Thus we have in the quantitative system dofelic sodi- 
potassic gehennane, and dofemaniac, sodicalcic, gehen- 
nane. The rock would furnish some interesting mic- 
roscopic data but these though valuable for record 
are always deadly dull in a paper that is read. 

I pass therefore to the real questions of interest 
which may be solved in Jell. These are the origin 
and production of the several kinds of igneous rocks, 
and the solution of that puzzling problem the sources 
of the metallic ores, and more especially the sulphur 
compounds. 

My observations show that the various kinds of 
igneous rocks are produced under the direction of the 
Jevil-in-Chief very much as charges are mixed for a 
furnace. Thus that the materials for the various lavas 
exist at the centre of the earth there is no doubt. The 
only point of interest is the form in which they occur. 
As "a matter of fact the following are kept in storage 
reservoirs in a molten state and under pressure. They 
can be tapped off as needed and in any desired propor- 
tion. There is a reservoir of pure Si02 , one of AI2 O3 , 
one of Fe2 O3 , one of FeO, one of MgO, one of CaO, 
one of K2 O and one of Na2 O. In these there are slight 
impurities of P2O5 , CI, $ etc, but there is also a separ- 
ate reservoir of FeS2 , mingled with lead, copper, zinc, 
"silver and gold. When the Jevil-in-Chief orders an- 
desite, he issues instructions for the proper proportion- 
al parts of these ingredients and the subordinate j evils 
run them together and over into a spout which connects 
with the volcanic conduit. Into this and on the prin- 
ciple of the injector, is run under enormous pressure 
steam and other mineralizers and the whole mixture, 
boiling and seething, forces its way through the zone 
of fiowage and so to the upper world. At rare inter- 
vals the metallic bath is tapped into it, especially dur- 
ing the expiring stages, and then ore deposits result as 
the igneous action in the upper world draws to a close. 
But I hear the Secretary of the Society say how can 
all this be in accordance with the planetesimal hyp. 
I do not see myself how in Jell it can be, but if carried 
away by that interesting figment of the imagination 
the planetessimal hypothesis you question the existence 
of Jell you contradict not only the testimony of the 
distinguished travellers who preceded me, but my 
personal observations and the testimony of all the 
orthodox divines for centuries. 

Time fails me to enlarge upon these topics although 
as you will see they furnish the clew to much thaf has 
troubled many thinkers hitherto. 

One other question will arise regarding Jell. Did 
I see nothing of the various remedial forms of treat- 
ment of the wicked which other travellers have noted? 
I did not, except in one minor case. They generally 
were given up about one generation ago and passed 
out of use. The only survival is one for the treatment 
of wicked cephalopods and brachiopods. Both these 
groups of organisms are provided with resistant shells 
into which after evil deeds on the surface they retired 
with impunity. In Jell the wicked ones have been 
gathered by thousands into a vast pool of water. 
First acid is turned in on them and it dissolves the shells 
to their great discomfort while nourishing the tissues; 
then alkaline calcic solutions are let in which repro- 
duce the shells while destroying the tissues, and thus 
alternately these two reactions are carried out until 
complete repentance is produced and the head Jevil 
can say "Now will you be good." 

I fell into conversation with the Jevil-in-Chief and we 
discussed many topics of interest. He informed me 
that among his other schemes for abstracting the water 



of Niagara he had contemplated sinking a shaft from 
the head of Goat Island and letting down directly into 
Jell 222.367 cubic feet per second of both Canadian 
and American water to use as steam in propelling the 
eruptive rocks to the surface. But the State Geologist 
of New York had raised such an agitation against 
using the waters for other purposes than the manufac- 
ture of sarsaparilla and other soft drinks that the 
subordinate Jevils in the New York Legislature and 
the Ontario Parliament refused to take his orders. 
So we parted and regretfully ending this interesting 
conversation I retraced my steps to the point where I 
had entered, passed up through the zones of fiowage 
and fracture, through the ground water and vadose 
region and shot up out of the ground in the Tenderloin. 
No one paid the slightest attention to me for everyone 
thought I was just one of the workers in the tunnels 
under the river who had been blown out by leaky air, 
an occurrence now so common that it no longer excites 
remark. 



THE COBALT-NICKEL ARSENIDES & SILVER 
DEPOSITS OF TEMISKAMING. 



This most valuable and comprehensive report, by 
Prof. Willet G. Miller, Provincial Geologist of Ontario, 
constitutes Part II of the Report of the Bureau of 
Mines for 1905. 

We have previously had occasion to congratulate 
the Ontario Bureau on the practical nature and value 
of bulletins issued therefrom dealing with the economic 
minerals of the Province, and from an economic stand- 
point the present monograph is in many respects the 
most interesting of the series and is bound to attract 
a great deal of interest and attention with the in- 
vesting public. 

After briefly summarizing the information given in 
respect to the situation and discovery of the Cobalt 
Silver Ores in the area, examined during 1904, by the 
Provincial Geologist, the report states that since then 
a considerable amount of exploration work has re- 
sulted in the further discovery of a number of extra- 
ordinary rich deposits. 

The deposits at Cobalt occupy narrow, practically 
vertical fissures or joints which cut through a series of 
usually slightly inclined metamorphosed, fragmental 
rocks of Lower Huronian ages. 

Mr. Miller states: — "The material in these veins has, 
in all likelihood, been deposited from highly heated 
and impure waters which circulated through the cracks 
and fissures of the crust and were probably associated 
with the post-Middle Huronian disbase and gabbro 
eruption. It is rather difficult to predicate the ori- 
ginal sources of the metals — silver, cobalt, nickel, 
arsenic and others — now found in these veins. They 
may have come up from a considerable depth with the 
waters, or they may have been leached out of what are 
now the folded and disturbed green stones and other 
rocks of the Keewatin. Analyses of various rocks of the 
area have not given a clue as to the origin of the ores. 
As these ore bodies in the vicinity of Cobalt station 
may be said to be unique among those known in North 
America, we have no chance of instituting comparisons 
on this continent. Some European veins, however, 
svich as those of Annaberg, Jochimsthal and other 
localities which will be again referred to, show a similar 
association of minerals. The origin of these has been 
explained by most authors by the supposition that the 
metals were leached from the surrounding rocks. The 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




Slabs of silver from the Trethewey Mine, location J. R. 7. The slab standing uprio-ht 
by the hammer is the 79 pounil specimen referred to in the text. 




Cobalt Hill vein, northwest corner of location R. L. 404. The photograph" shows the 
fractured character of the rock and a gentle anticline. The vein is seen to be in step- 
like forms as if it had been affected by horizontal faults, but the ore is not brecciated. 



16 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



writer has found, however, from the descriptions 
which have been pvibUshed of most of these 
European occurrences, that there are usually basic 
dikes in the vicinity of the veins. These dikes appear 
to have in some cases the same relation to the ore 
bodies that those of diabase and gabbro have in the 
Ontario Cobalt region." 

The more immediate ores in these veins are native 
silver, with smaltite, niccolite, and related minerals. 
In addition, there are a number of secondry or decom- 
position products with rather indefinite character- 
istics, such as asbolite, consisting essentially of the 
oxides of cobalt, managanese, etc. The cobalt bloom 
and annabergite occur intermixed, at times, in pro- 
portion such that the red color of the former' counter- 
acts the green colour of the latter, a white claylike 
substance being the result. There are occasionally 
other sulphides present than those mentioned, es- 
pecially in the wall rock. These consist of copper 
pyrites and bornite, which are the sulphides of lead; 
and iron pyrites, the disulphide of iron. Zinc blende 
is found occasionally. These minerals in the wall 
rock were probably deposited before the vein minerals. 



been so rich in silver, cobalt, nickel or arsenic as those 
of Ontario. 

The five or six productive properties from which 
shipment haVe been made during the last few months, 
all carry, with one exception, high silver values, as 
do also ^e veins more recently discovered. During 
the year, production for the first quarter ending 
March 31st, during which shipments were made, was 
3.54.05 tons of ore valued at $293,552. The ore thus 
averaged $829 a ton. The average percentage of the 
metals in the ore was as follows:— 

Per cent. 

Silver 4 802 

Cobalt 8 264 

Nickel 4 

Arsenic 34.606 

The 4.802 per cent, of silver represents 1,406.27 
ounces a ton. The cobalt, nickel and arsenic in one 
car load are not included, no returns having been made. 

During the second quarter, March 31st to June 30th, 
the shipments were 537 tons, valued at $394,552, or 
an average of $734 a ton. 




La Rose vein. 



One characteristic of the group is the subordinate part 
which sulphur plays in comparison with arsenic. 
Antimony, which is not abundant, is found in some 
compounds where arsenic might be expected to be 
found, since the latter is so much more abundant. 
For instance, while both native silver and arsenides 
are present in abundance, no compounds of arsenic 
and silver have yet been recognized although they are 
probably present. It would also be reasonable to 
expect to find some compounds of bismuth, since this 
metal occurs in the free state in considerable quanti- 
ties in some parts of the deposits. It might also be 
expected that native arsenic would occur at times. 
The report notes that nearly all the chemicals of 
minerals found in the Joachimsthal deposits of Bo- 
hemia are present in the Temiskaming ores. But 
these liohemian deposits do not appear to have ever 



The average percentage of the metals in the ore for 
this quarter was : — 

Per cent. 

Silver 4.158 

Cobalt 6.890 

Nickel 3.091 

Arsenic 30.912 

The metals in the ore were sold at approximately 
the following pnces:— Silver, 55 to 60 cents an oz. 
Troy for 90 per cent, of the contents, cobalt, 65 cents, 
nickel, 12 to 15 cents, and arsenic about 1 cent a 
pound. 

During the first quarter of the year, shipments were 
made from the La Rose mine, the New Ontario mine, 
from the McKinley and Darragh, and bv the Nipissing 
Mining Company, working the Cobalt Hill and Little 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



17 



Silver veins in the north-west and south-west corners 
of R.L. 404, prospectively. At the present time there 
iire probablv fourteen or more shipping mines. Ore 
shipped so far has been sorted by hand, while much 
ore that in other localities would be considered high 
grade is accumulating on the dumps. It is expected 
t^hat in the near future this ore will be milled, and so 
help materiallv increase the output of the region. The 
extraordinarily high grade value of the shipping ore is 
shown in the statement that on the Trethewey vein 
$200,000 worth of ore was produced from an open cut 
50 feet long and 25 feet deep, the maximum width of 
the vein being not more than 8 inches. The amount 
realized from the shipment of one carload of 30 tons 
of ore from this mine was between $75,000 and $80,000 
and the analyses of a shipment of 50 tons gave ap- 
proximately the following percentage of metal: — 
Arsenic, 38%; cobalt, 12%; nickel, 3.5, and silver, 
190,000 ounces. 

Elsewhere in the report reference is again jnaade to 
the Cobalt Hill vein, which was described in the 13th 
Report of the Bureau. This vein was one of the four 
discovered at the time of Professor Miller's visit to the 



" Most of the cobalt-silver veins occur in the Lower 
Huronian. A few have been found in the diabase. 
There is no reason, so far as the writer can see, why the 
veins should not also occur in the under-lying Keewatin 
and some of the more recently discovered ones, near the 
centre of location R. L 404 appear to be in this group. 
The Keewatin greenstones and other rocks are tougher 
and do not fracture with the same ease as the over- 
lying series of the Lower Huronian. Hence the solu- 
tions have not had the same freedom of movement in 
the former as in the latter. In so far as the precipita- 
tion effects which the rocks of either series may have 
on solutions working through fissures in them there 
seems to be little difference between the two. Many 
of the pebbles and boulders and much of the cement 
material in the Lower Huronian have been derived 
from the under-lying Keewatin. Hence one would 
think they would have about the same influence in 
precipitating substances from solutions as the rocks 
of the latter formation. The distribution of the 
Lower Huronian, as will be seen from- the map, is 
irregular. At one time, in all likelihood, it formed a 
complete layer or mantle over the uneven surface of 




district in Nov., 1903. The ore is described as unique, 
in that silver is absent, in paying quantities, the 
values being confined to cobalt, nickel and arsenic. 

Following an interesting chapter on the analysis of 
the ores of the district, is a description of the cobalt- 
silver veins. Most of those worked have been develop- 
ed by means of open cuts, but the most systematic 
development work has been done on the La Rose, 
where a shaft has been sunk and drifting carried on 
at the 80 feet levels. It is stated that approximately 
a million dollars Avorth of ore has been blocked out on 
this vein; but this is said to be probably the largest 
ore body yet found in the area, and Mr. Miller states 
that it would hardly be correct to infer that smaller 
veins can be followed as persistently. We quote the 
following upon report: — 



the older rocks. This has been removed to a con- 
siderable extent by erosion, leaving the rocks now in 
more or less isolated belts and patches. 

"The more important veins so far found in the 
Lower Huronian lie in what may be called three parallel 
belts. Those first discovered are in a belt which runs 
about parallel with the railway m the vicinity of 
Cobalt lake. A small belt connects the northeastern 
corner of Peterson lake with the northwest corner of 
Cross lake. A third belt stretches from Giroux lake 
to the southeast end of Cross lake, in which important 
deposits occur. Although these three belts have a 
strike approximately in a northeast and southwest 
direction, the strike of the veins is not uniform, as wUl 
be seen from the plan. Those on J B 7, J R 6, and on 
the location immediately southwest of the latter claim 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



strike east and west. The veins on J S 14 and J 13 1 
strike approximately nortlieast and southwest while 
that in the northwest corner of R L 404 strikes north- 
west and southeast. The vein in the southwest corner 
ot this location strikes east and west, which is the 
direction of strike of the majority of the veins 

"None of the veins are wide. The width of ore in 
the Trethewey vein on J B 7, for instance, had a maxi- 
muni width of about 8 inches, while the vein in the 
northwest corner of R L 404 has 14 inches of ore and 
that on J S 14 showed about 18 inches . Some veins 
which have been traced 100 feet or more average not 
more than one inch in width. The surface, being 
uneven and more or less covered with loose deposits 
and with green timber, does not afford an opportunity 
of tracing the outcrops of the veins any great distance 
and it is not known definitely how long most of the 
outcrops would prove to be if the material referred to 
were removed from the surface of the solid rock 

"It is also impossible to give much definite hiforma- 
tion concerning the depths to which these veins will 
reach Most of them do not appear to cut through 
the older Keewatin series which forms an uneven sur- 



Icss depth near the outcrop than some distance away 
rom It. Similarly, if a diabase dike or mass cuts 
through the Lower Huronian in a vertical direction 
we have evidence of a greater depth in an adjacent 
vein than If the diabase cut through the Huronian at a 
lowej; angle. In the latter case the vein may be dig- 
connected or cut through by the diabase at no great 
depth from the surface. Examples of both of these 
occurrences can be cited in the field. It is likely how- 
ever that in some cases, at least, a vein passing down- 
ward through Lower Huronian conglomerate or slate 
will penetrate sheets or sills of diabase which it may 
encounter. Similarly veins starting at the surface in 
a diabase sheet or sill will likely penetrate underlying 
conglomerate or s ate, judging from what we know of 
the veins of the T ort Arthur district were the diabase 
bears a similar relation to the fragmental series " 
fhif """^ °' e^^-eptions to the statement 

that the veins occur in the Lower Huronian, thus at 
the nor hwest corner of Cross lake silver and associated 
metals have been found in diabase, and also, in the 
Township of Dymond, cobalt bloom has been found in 
the diabase. Veins have recently also been found in 




Trethewey vein and discovery post, J. B., 7, May, 1904. 



face below the Lower Huronian. In the vicinity of 
Cobalt station the latter rocks are found on hill-tops 
which stand about 500 feet above the low water level 
,f emiskaming, where similar outcrops are found 
Ihe depth to which a vein may reach depends, 
therefore, on whether it descends into an old valley of 
the older rocks or whether it lies above a former hilltop 
No one can tell this of course without diamond drillino" 
or sinking a shaft. Evidence of the probable thickness 
01 the Huronian or vein-bearing formation can, how- 
ever, be determined by noting the outcrops of the 
Keewatm or the intrusive diabases. An exposure of 
Keewatin surrounded by the Lower Huronian repre- 
sents an old hilltop. It is therefore evident that a vein 
which strikes towards this outcrop is likely to have a 



the diabase on the Handy and Jacobs locations, this 
latter being the chief producing mine in the diabase 

Ihe area so far productive in the Cobalt region is 
shown on the geological map and plan accompanying 
this report to be covered by a rectangular with a 
length of 2i miles in a north and south direction and 
a width east and west somewhat less. The chief pro 
perties m the northwest part of this rectangular are in 
the vicinity of Cobalt lake and the railway, and another 
important group lies immediately south of Glen and 
Kerr lakes, in the southeast of the rectangular 

The system of water courses in this district is a re- 
markable one. The chief watercourses follow either 
a northeast or southwest, or northwest and southeast 
direction, the latter being the more prominent Con- 



> 



\ 




5THEL LA^ 



^ 6000 7000 QOOO 




9000 



GEOLOGICAL PLAN and SECTIOh 



ALONG TRAM LINE 

'^^^^^^^^ 4T ^^^^^^^^^^^ 



VICTORIA 



NES 



VERT. SCALE 320"=r' 
MOR. SCALE 800=r" 




i \ 



I 



I 



! 

4 



r 




THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



19 



cerning the origin of the two great systems of water 
courses, little information is at present obtainable, 
thus it is impossible to say whether the courses follow 
fault lines or simply folds. They have, doubtless, been 
due to regional disturbances in the post-Middle Hur- 
onian times. Much of the surface of the country is 
covered by recent and glacial deposits, and the exposed 
rocks present a complex of igneous and metamorphosed 



fragmental material with the minor faults and folds, 
and that it will be difficult to prove the existence of 
what may be called regional faults or folds. 

The report also deals with Lake Superior silver de- 
posits of the silver mines in the area adjacent to Port 
Arthur. There is also a chapter on other Canadian 
nickel-cobalt ores, and a brief account of foreign cobalt 
deposits. 





A typical silver-cobalt vein on J. B. 6. The head of the hammer shows the width. 



20 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



THE BEARING OF ENGINEERING ON MINING. 
With Especial Reference to Mining Education.* 

By Prof. J. B. Porter, Hon. D.Sc. 
Lord Milner, in his altogether admiral^le book on 
Egypt, has much to say of the work done by engineers 
in reclaiming and developing that wonderfiil country. 
He refers, of course, to the men of our day and gener- 
ation who have laboured, and are still labouring, to 
control the Nile, to economise and distribute its waters, 
to build railways through the desert; in a word, to 
carry to successful completion by modern means pub- 
lic works most of which have been proposed, or at 
least dreamed of, since the beginning of history. 

The book does not concern itself greatly with the 
past but incidentally it tells us that in ancient times 
" Egypt had very good engineers," who did great deeds. 
On other pages misfortunes and failures are clearly 
laid at the doors of those in authority who have from 
time to time failed to make proper use of the available 
resources of engineering science. 

The great thing about the book as a whole is its 
masterly presentation of the advantages of British 
influence, of honesty, order, and commonsense in gov- 
ernment; but to an engineer its secondary thesis is 
of even greater personal interest: the absolute bene- 
ficence of engineering works in the development and 
utilisation of natural resources. 

I have referred to Egypt because there we find the 
remains of perhaps the earliest of all engineering work, 
there we see some of the most interesting and one of 
the most notable achievements of the last century; 
and, finally, -because there we have just completed one 
of the grandest and most directly beneficent works of 
modern engineering. Egypt thus shows us in a very 
clear and simple way what the engineer has done for 
the good of mankind ; but the same story may be read 
in every part of the world, and, to my mind,' it is one 
of the greatest stories of modern times". 

I do not wish to make hght of the great work that 
is being done in other departments of science, or even 
to weigh one branch of knowledge and one kind of 
effort agahist another, but I do believe that none pos- 
sesses greater interest, none is more honourable, none 
is of greater use to the nation or to the world at large 
than engineering. 

The influence of engineering in mining is but one 
case in the general proposition just statedi, and though 
probably not as important as those of several other 
branches of engineering development, its aggregate 
importance is immense. 

Mining has been one of the world's great interests 
from very early days; but until recent years it had 
been so uncertain that its development has been greatly 
retarded. The discovery of the mineral was in nearly 
all cases a matter of chance; mining, owing to diffi- 
culties of pumping, hoisting and ventilating, was usual- 
ly on a small scale, and often most hazardous and cost- 
ly; As a result, profitable operations were confined 
to rich or favourably-situated ores and coals, and 
quite too frequently enterprises failed when apparently 
well under way, owing to some unforeseen mischance, 
or to the loss or decreased value of the ore body. 
Chance still plays a great part in mining, but it is no 
longer the ruling influence. The first discovery in a 
new region is still usually fortuitous, but it is promptly 
followed by good scientific work. Government sur- 
veyors map out the district, and its geology, in a broad 
way, and private mining geologists direct the detailed 

*A lecture delivered before the British Association at Kim- 
herloy. South Africa, Sept. (ith, 190.5. 



prospecting. Modern appliances, of which the dia- 
mond drill is by far the most important,, make it pos- 
sible to explore to any necessary depth with celerity 
and economy, and thus the size and value of the ore 
bodies can be approximately determined before ex- 
tensive mining operations are begun. 

Mining proper, deferred vmtil these preliminary ex- 
plorations give it justification, can now proceed with 
almost as great certainty of success as any other branch 
of engineering; and thanks to high explosives, rock 
drills, and all the modern appliances for hoisting, 
pumping, ventilating,- etc., the operations can proceed 
with such rapidity and certainty, and with so little 
danger, that large outputs can be produced at a cost 
per ton that is usually a small fraction of what it was 
a generation ago. 

These improvements in methods and reductions in 
cost have played a great part in the development of 
our modern material civilization. In ancient times, 
and even until less than a century ago, gold and silver, 
and perhaps also gems, were the chief products of mines' 
Now, in spite of an increase of many fold in the output 
of these materials, in spite of such mines as we have 
seen within the last few days — producing more gold 
and gems themselves than did the whole world fifty 
years ago— these precious metal industries form but 
a small part of the work of the miner, whose high duty 
it now is to produce the main part of all the structural 
materials of modern engineering, and the coal which 
has become the almost universal fuel of the present 
day. The wealth of a country still depends to a great 
extent on its agriculture and on the number and thrift 
of its people, but place as a world Power can be better 
measured by its production of coal and iron. 

This great development of the mining industry that 
I have briefly indicated has been largely due to im- 
provements in general engineering, and to the opening 
up of new districts and to the creation of new or in- 
creased demands for material; but those in charge of 
the actual underground operations deserve a full share 
of praise, for, in addition to original work on their own 
account, they have been keen to seize uppn each new 
invention that could be turned to their uses. 

Gunpowder was used (I believe first in the mines 
of Saxony) long before the disappearance of plate 
armour. Nitroglycerine and its compounds, invented 
little more than a generation ago, were promptly ac- 
cepted by mine and tunnel engineers, and were exten- 
sively produced at the mines themselves before they 
were commercially procurable elsewhere. 

I need only name Watts to remind you that his 
inventions were primarily made on behalf of mining. 
Tramways were laid in mines as soon as on the surface. 
Cable haulage was used in scores of collieries before 
it appeared in the streets of even the most progressive 
of the American cities. The electric tram was, I be- 
lieve, first used on the surface; but one was in success- 
ful operation fully sixteen years ago underground, 
and to-day there are thousands of miles of under- 
ground lines, with an enormous aggregate tonnage, 
operated by the most recent of means. 

I had intended to illustrate this development of 
mining at some length by means of slides, showing the 
changes which have taken place in methods and appli- 
ances, but, unfortunately, the slides have failed to 
reach me, and I shall, therefore, illustrate only one 
branch of mining, and only one group of mines. The 
mines at Kimberley are, however, almost ideal for my 
purpose, and afford a wonderful, yet typical, illustra- 
tion of the progress of the art of mining. Thirty years 
ago the methods employed here were as crude as pos- 
sible. The district was new and inaccessible, and 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



21 



methods abandoned half a century before in more 
favoured places were the best that could be employed. 
The great wealth of the district soon, however, attrac- 
ted a large population which in turn brought about 
rapid development, able men took charge of the work, 
and to-day the mines at Kimberley are thoroughly 
modern in every way, and in some respects set an 
example of high achievement to the whole world. 

In mining operations we rarely produce a material 
pure enough as it comes from the pit to be of immedi- 
ate use. Coal and iron ore are sometimes fit enough, 
but even they are usually sorted, and often elaborately 
washed before they go to the consumer. Nearly all 
other ores contain comparatively little of the valuable 
mineral — say, 2 to 20 per cent, in most ores of lead, 
copper, zinc, etc., and the merest fraction of a per 
cent, in the ores of gold and silver. In extreme cases 
the proportion is amazingly minute. Gold ore from 
the Rand averages little more than one-third of an 
ounce per ton — which means that it contains about 
one part of gold to 100,000 parts of worthless rock, 
which have to be crushed, separated and disposed of 
before the gold can be utilized. In some gold mines 
where conditions are very favourable one-six-hundred 
thousandths of gold can be profitably treated, and in 
certain gold gravels in California and Australia one 
part in fifteen millions has been known to pay operat- 
ing expenses. These cases are the extreme results 
of large-scale work with most modern appliances and 
methods; but they are all surpassed here in the Kim- 
berley district, where, I am told, there are mines 
which are, or at least can be worked at a profit on so 
low a recovery as one-tenth of a carat per load. A 
carat weighs a little over 3 grains and a load of blue 
ground weighs 1,600 lbs. One-tenth of a carat per 
load is therefore one part in about forty million. The 
average richness of the Hue ground is greater than this 
and may perhaps reach one part in ten million, but 
even this recovery is lower than that of any other 
profitable mining enterprise, and the first mentioned 
figure of one in forty or perhaps million is the extreme 
achievement in this direction of the mineral industry, 
and literally surpasses the proverbially impossible 
task of finding a needle in a haystack. 

It is, of course, the exceedingly great value of the 
diamond which makes it possible for mines to handle 
so much worthless material in order to get the little 
particles of precious stuff, but this fact does not lessen 
our interest in the operation, and the concentration 
practiced here may well be considered one of the most 
remarkable achievements of modern mining engineer- 
ing. 

The Kimberley mines are also giving us admirable 
engineering in other directions. Their arrangements 
for hoisting and handling material are very good and 
for several years they have held^the world's record for 
maximum output from a single^shaft, in spite of the 
efforts of mines and collieries in many lands. They 
have also developed and modified the old system of 
mining by caving and filling to a degree of perfection, 
which, all things considered, is most remarkably safe, 
economical and rapid. 

I have a series of slides, which I will now show, 
depicting the gradual advancement in connection with 
local mining engineering from the earliest days of the 
Diamond Fields up to the present. (The views com- 
prised a fine series illustrating admirably the develop- 
ments referred to, and were received with applause. 
Referring to the picture of the De Beers Workshops — 
the last of the series — the lecturer said: "The De 
Beers Company buy their machinery at the places 
where it is manufactured when it is possible to do so 



to advantage, but they make their own repairs, and 
do a lot of engineering work in the shops you see de- 
picted, including the making of big guns when neces- 
sary.") 

It would be easy to give other illustrations of mining 
development, but enough has been said to show that 
the men in charge of our mineral industry have been 
alert, and have not failed to keep pace with engineers 
in other lines of work. The full measure of what they 
have done can perhaps be best shown by a few approxi- 
mate figures. 

Table of approximate tonnages and values of minerals 
produced in 1903-4: — 







\/ O 1 1 1 £^ /^f 

,V dlUc Ol 






Crude Ore 


Name 


1 ons 01 Ore. 


or Metal. 


Aluminium 


15,000 


£ 1,025,000 


Antimony 


200,000 


500,000 


Arsenic 


50,000 


100,000 


Asbestos 


50,000 


250,000 


Asphaltum 


600,000 


1,300,000 


wta 


220 000 


250,000 




149,000 


100^000 


Chronic Ore 


100 000 


2.50,000 


Coal 


882,000,000 


220,000^000 


Copper 


4,000,000 


35,000,000 


Diamonds 


5,500,000 


6,000,000 


Feldspar 


80,000 


200,000 


Furnace Fluxes 


30,000,000 


10,000,000 


Gold 


50,000,000 


70,000,000 


Graphite 


77,000 


1,100,000 


Iron 


100,000,000 


110,000,000 


Lead 


10,000,000 


11,100,000 


Manganese 


2,200,000 


2,200,000 


Mercury 


200,000 


900,000 


Nickel. 


400,000 


2,000,000 


Petroleum 


26,000,000 


4,800,000 


Precious Stones (ex-diamonds) 


1,000,000 


1,200,000 


Phosphates 


3,500,000 


3,000,000 


Salt 


12,000,000 


6,000,000 


Silver 


5,000,000 


18,500,000 


Sulphur 


500,000 


2,100,000 


Zinc 


2,000,000 


13,000,000 


Totals 


1,135,832,000 


520,875,000 



These statistics might be elaborated, and pointed 
with illustrations and descriptions of old and new 
methods of mining in such a way as to make a very 
interesting lecture; but there is little to be gained by 
dwelling longer on this part of our theme. 

Engineering, or specifically, mining engineering, has 
played a great part in the development of the world's 
resources, but the work is but begun. Our mines 
have barely scratched the surface of the earth; our 
engineers have developed the merest fraction of its 
total resources. If the signs of the times are true, we 
may safely say that the engineering age has just fairly 
begun, and that the developments of the future, es- 
pecially in beneficent use of natural resources, will 
inconceivably surpass anything we now know. 

In view of what I have just said, it is our plain duty 
to see that the young men who are to be the engineers 
of the next generation shall be as fit as possible for 
their great task. Until, say, two generations ago, 
engineering work of all kinds in civil life was done 
either by military engineers, by men educated in pure 
science, or by men trained on the works and often 
lacking any but the most elementary schooling. None 
of these men were properly educated for engineering 
in the modern sense, but on the other hand an unusual 
proportion of them were beyond doubt especially fitted 
for their work by temperament or circumstances. 
This fact is evident from the high average of ability 
and of single-minded devotion shown by the engineers 
of that time. 

(To be continued next month). 



22 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



SOME SUGGESTED AMENDMENTS TO THE 
YUKON MINING LAW. 

(By J. B. Tyrrell.) 
Premising that placer mining in the Yukon Territory 
is very different from placer mining in any other part of 
the world, and that therefore the Mining Laws, to be 
suitable here, must needs be different from the mining 
laws of other countries: — 

Free Miners Certificates. 
Every man in the Yukon Territory is living directly 
or indirectly off the product of the mines in the country. 
If the money paid for Free Miners' Certificates is 
urgently needed by the Government as a means of 
increasing the revenue, every man in the Territory 
should be obliged to take out such a certificate for the 
tax should be equally levied on all, irrespective of 
whether a man is a direct producer or not. If the 
money is not urgently needed for revenue purposes, 
and whether it is needed or not, it certainly should 
not be levied as a tax on a particular industry, and 
that the vital industry of the country. 

The necessity of obtaining such a certificate means a 
considerable loss of time to every prospector and mine 
owner in the country; but more than that it means 
that no man, no matter how favourable the condi- 
tions surrounding him, is at liberty to prospect, and 
stake a claim, unless he has already provided himself 
with a certificate giving him a right to do so. It is 
thus a direct discouragement to the old prospector 
by taking money from him when he needs it most, it 
prevents hunters, trappers, etc., from prospecting for if 
they discovered precious metal some one else would be 
very likely to stake the ground before they would be 
able to go and get a certificate and return to the ground, 
and in general it engenders the feeling that it is useless 
to prospect unless definite arrangements have first 
been made with the Mining Recorder. Had such a 
regulation been in force in the Western States during 
the past fifty years it is certain that the discovery and 
development of their mines would have been greatly 
retarded. 

Placer Mining Claims. 

All claims should be of the same size, and should be 
as nearly as possible square, so that the direction and 
character of the "pay," and the location of a claim on 
a main stream, on its tributary or on no stream at all 
would make the least possible difference. In staking 
such a claim most men will comprehend and define 
its shape and extent much more clearly than if it is 
longer in one direction than in the other. 

In regard to the size of such claims, considering the 
tenor of most of the gald-bearing ground likely to be 
discovered in the Yukon Territory, and the expense 
of installing efficient machinery on it, one thousand 
(1,000) feet square seems to be a reasonable size, and 
this is the same area as the creek claims under the 
present regulations. But the question of the size of 
claims is one involving a discussion of whether the land 
should be divided up among very many owners, or 
whether it should be held by fewer owners who would 
probably mine more systematically, and I shall not 
take up that matter here. 

_ In order to encourage exploration and prospecting, a 
discoverer should be allowed to take a larger block of 
ground than the above, say two claims long and two 
claims wide, for the discoverer has an inherent right 
to a reward for his successful search, while the stam- 
peders or subsequent locators and those who profit by 
the enterprise of the discoverer have only such rights 
as the State sees fit to give them, with the view of 



furthering the development and best interests of the 
country. It should here be borne in mind that the 
successful i)rospector, the discoverer of valuable 
mineral, is the cheapest and most efficient immigration 
agent that the country possesses, and that the country 
is bound to profit by his discovery, no matter how rich 
a strike he makes. 

If oblong claims such as those defined under existing 
mining regulations, namely 500 feet long and 1,(J00 or 
2,000 feet wide, are continued, a well defined baseline 
on the creeks is almost a necessity to avoid great 
confusion, even though it may be an expensive ex- 
pedient. However this base line should be merely 
directive as to the course of the boundary lines of the 
claims, and should not determine the positions of the 
claims themselves, as it does at present. For instance 
a man might stake a creek claim on some of the creeks 
in the Klondike district, be given 1,000 feet on each 
side of the base line as provided for by the present 
regulations, and still the creek would not be on his 
claim at all, but would be a long distance away to one 
side of it. If a man stakes a creek claim, or any other 
claim for that matter, he should be allowed to choose 
where the middle line of that claim would be, irres- 
pective of the distance of the base line on one side or 
the other from him. His Number 1 stake would 
govern the position of this middle line, which would 
then be run from this stake parallel to the base line 
in a general direction towards his Number 2 stake. 
From this middle line, and at right angles to it, his 
claim might then extend 500 or 1,000" feet as was 
thought advisable. A man would thus be given only 
such ground as he wanted, and in which he had con- 
fidence, and which he would be likely to thoroughly 
prospect. 

Disputes. 

Disputes as to the location and boundaries of claims 
should be decided by the Gold Commissioner on the 
ground, where the parties to the disputes would be 
able to explain and point out the conditions clearly 
and fully. Had this been the case in the past, ninety 
per cent, of the litigation with which this country has 
been cursed would have been prevented, and litigation 
means waste of time, energy and money, three things 
that are so necessary for the opening up and develop- 
ment of the country, and perhaps worse still, it en- 
genders a feeling of utter despair in the possibility of 
free and unhampered work and progress. 

On this point I cannot do better than quote from Mr. 
J. H. Curie, the eminent Mining Engineer, who spent 
part of the summer of 1901 in the Klondike district, 
and who in his book "Gold Mines of the World," 
writes as follows:— " The Gold Commissioner, his 
"assistants, and the Claim Inspectors, seem to have no 
" power — or to be afraid to use it. Their only remedy 
"is, 'Oh, take it into court.' Dawson, as a conse- 
"quence, reeks with lawyers and litigation. A couple 
"of Australian mining wardens, of the old school, who 
"would ride up the creeks themselves, interrogate the 
"parties to a dispute, and settle the matter on the 
"spot — sticking the boundary and water-right pegs 
"into the ground themselves, and warning the men to 
" touch these at their peril — would do more good than 
"the dozens of officials there now, and would soon 
"empty the courts of litigants." 

Representation or Assessment Work. 
After a claim has been granted to a man, he should 
be allowed the fullest liberty to work it as he may see 
fit, consistent with the freedom of his neighbour. 
Some men are slower at determining the best methods 
of working their ground than others are, or they may 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



23 



I work slower than others do when they have deter- 
i mined on a method, preferring small profits to financial 
ruin, even if the latter is accompanied by the applause 
' of the multitude. However, they are not necessarily 
. poorer citizens on this account, and if the value of a 
: citizen is to be determined at all by his willingness to 
I remain in the country and become part of its popula- 
' tion, working carefully and conscientiously all the 
time, rather than by the rapidity with which he is 
able to seize on some rich prize, and carry it off to 
enjov elsewhere, he should be encouraged or at least 
protected in such careful work as he is trying to do, 
and should not be continuously urged to join the rush, 
! and get out of the country as quickly as possible. The 
town of Dawson and the Klondike district in its 
vicinity, if carefully nurtured, may form a nucleus for 
the development and settlement of the whole of the 
surrounding portions of this vast territory, whereas 
if the enterprise of the country, namely mining, is 
forced Onward regardless of cost, this camp is destined 
before long to dwindle out of existence, and the Yukon 
Territory must then look for its re-opening to the 
overflow from our great neighbour across the Inter- 
national Boundary Line. 

Nothing will conduce more to the stability of the 
population than to give to each man a right, after he 
has opened up and developed a piece of ground, to 
live on it and hold it as his own, so that even if his 
claim should cease to be remunerative if worked under 
present conditions, he may have a home to which he 
can return when he is not employed elsewhere without 
let or hindrance from anyone; without being obliged 
to report to the Government annually or at any time 
his whereabouts; and without being subjected to the 
possibility of change tenure from year to year. 

If this view is correct, rather than the one that the 
State is very anxious that any gold in sight should be 
taken out of the ground as quickly as possible, or in a 
mining sense that the country should be gutted at 
once, regardless of the development of its ore reserves, 
the annual assessment work, of the Government 
valuation of $200.00, necessary to be done and proved 
before the Mining Recorder each year, before a re- 
newal of a mining claim can be obtained, has dwindled 
to an absurdity. 

On developed mining property it is simply an un- 
remunerative vicious tax, which is all used up in the 
collecting, from which the Government receives no 
revenue, and which does not contribute to, or assist 
in, the permanent settlement of the country. A man 
owning valuable developed mining property should 
not, and in most cases will not, be diverted from the 
plans and methods that he has determined on for the 
operation of his mine by a tax, however absurd, of 
two hundred dollars a year. 

On undeveloped mining property the assessment 
work, as provided for under the present Mining Regu- 
lations, has rarely, if ever, increased its value, either 
- to the individual or to the country. Residence on 
such property for a certain length of time each year 
might reasonably be demanded to encourage settle- 
ment, and as an evidence of good faith, but after this 
good faith has been shown, by the doing of a reason- 
able amount of development, a title should be given 
which would be free from all restrictions and inter- 
ference. 

In both cases the present perpetual tax of two 
hundred dollars a year should be done away with. 

Title. 

There is very little need of emphasizing the necessity 
for better and less hampered title to mining ground 



than is now given to holders of mining claims. The 
exploitation of the Alluvial and Bench gravels of the 
Klondike has already needed a rather heavy invest- 
ment of capital, but the time has now come when 
still heavier investments are necessary if the low- 
grade gravels are to be worked at a profit. The money 
for these investments must be looked for in the money 
markets of the East, where it can be obtained at a low 
rate of interest, but before it can be obtained at all a 
satisfactory title to the ground must be produced. I 
have no hesitation in saying that of late years the lack 
of an apparently secure title has been the greatest bar 
to obtaining money for investment here in large mining 
enterprises. 

Besides, if absolute titles were given to mining pro- 
perties, there would be no necessity of granting con- 
cessions or special privileges to any one, for in that 
case capital could be obtained for the working of a 
group of claims on any desired scale or by any method. 
Freedom of Action. 

No reason suggests itself to me why a miner should 
not be as free from continuous paternal Government 
control as a farmer or any other citizen. If he were 
so freed, in this country at least, he would soon lose 
his reputation as a kicker and would drop back into 
the position of a c^uiet unobtrusive man who attends 
to his own business. He should be treated as an 
independent and honest man until he is clearly proved 
to be otherwise. There is probably nothing more 
humiliating to him than the necessity of constantly 
appearing before the wickets of the Government 
offices to submit his statements to the adjudication 
of the clerks there employed, and often to receive 
tardily as favours what he knows that he can demand 
as his rights. The laws are intended for his benefit, 
and not for his hindrance, annoyance and humiliation, 
and other things being approximately equal he will go 
where he will not be so humiliated. 

In conclusion, I would add that the best laws irt the 
world may be formulated, but unless these laws are 
administered with impartiality, integrity and promp- 
titude they will be of little value in promoting the 
welfare of the community. 



NOTES ON SOME RECENT EXPERIMENTS* 
On the Magnetic Concentration of Iron Sands from 
The Lower St. Lawrence. 

(By John F. Robertson, M. Sc., S. Can. Soc. C.E.) 
In attempting to use the iron sands from the lower 
St. Lawrence in a blast furnace, three difficulties are 
met with: — 

First, the low percentage of iron on account of the 
dilution of iron bearing minerals with ordinary sand. 

Second, the presence of an amount of titanium much 
greater than that usually considered permissible in an 
iron ore. 

Third, the fineness of the material. 

The third difficulty can be overcome by briquetting 
and may be left to the metallurgist. This note deals 
only with attempts to cheaply overcome the first and 
second diiffculties. 

The apparatus used in the experiments described 
below is of special design based on the Heberli drum 
separator. It consists of a thin hollow brass cylinder 
about eight inches in diameter and six inches long, 
revolving loose on a hollow axle through which wires 
are passed to a set of eight electro magnets arranged 

*rrom a pai.er read before Mining Section Can. Soc. C.E., 
Nov. 30th 1905. 



i 



24 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



radially around the axle, and together filling one-half 
of the drum. The pole pieces just clear the inside of 
the brass cylinder. Each has a width of f to 1^ inches 
as desired, perpendicular to the axis, and a length of 
about six inches parallel to it. Each magnet is wound 
are with fifty-five turns of insulated wire, and the wires 
led out through the hollow axle to a connection board 
so arranged that the magnets can be connected in series, 



In concentrating dry sands, the machine is run as ir 
Fig. 3, the sand being fed near the top of the revolvim 
cyhnder. The non-magnetic material is collectec 
directly under the edge of the cylinder, while the iron 
pulled radially by the magnets and moved by the cylin- 
der, passes under the latter and falls off on the othei 
Side. 

When working with wet sand, the cylinder is rotated 







»' If 









Fig. 1. View of Apparatus 






. 

































FIG. 2 . 

Sectional Elevations of Separator. 



or parallel, and each can be given either north or south 
polarity. In the experiments described below, the 
magnets were all in series, with alternate polarity thus: 
N-S-N-S-N-S. The magnets do not revolve with the 
cylinder, but may be set to cover any 180 degrees 
of its circumference desired. The sand is fed to the 
machine from an adjustable hopper which can be 
placed in different positions so that the feed can be 
run in at the top or at any part of the side of the revol- 
ving cylinder. Fig. 1 shows a photograph of the whole 
machine and Fig. 2 two sectional elevations of the 
cylinder. 

The advantage of having the magnets of alternate 
polarity is that the little grains of iron are turned end 
for end in passing each magnet. As there are eight 
rnagnets, the grains of iron are reversed six or seven 
times, and in trying to arrange themselves to suit the 
magnetism of the various poles they liberate the grains 
of sand which might otherwise be entangled in a bunch 
of grains of iron and thus be carried over into the 
finished product. 

The apparatus was designed to be run either dry or 
wet and the drum can be rotated in either direction 
and at a great variety of speeds. 



m the opposite direction, and the sand fed against the 
side about half way down. The sand, with some water 
from the jet A (Fig. 4), reaches the cyhnder at B. 
That part of the cylinder is moving upwards, and the 
friction of the magnetic material as pulled by the 
magnets is great enough to carry it with the cylinder 
against the stream of water from the jet C. The non- 
magnetic minerals, not being attracted, are washed 
down and away. D and E are two water jets to clean 
the cylinder from any materials which tend £o adhere 
beyond the proper points for discharge. 

It was found that the co-efficient of friction of mag- 
netite on brass is so low that the grains tended to 
accumulate in rows in front of each pole piece. This 
difficulty was overcome by placing a few strips of 
electric tape across the drum parallel to the axis. 
Covering the drum with canvas was also tried, but 
while this gave good results in drv concentration, it 
carried too much non-magnetic stuff when run wet. 

The magnetic field utilized in the separator is the 
stray field. As first designed, the gap between the 
jx)l(> pieces was made quite small, with the result that 
a large current was required to produce a sufficient 
strength of stray field outside the cylinder. The gap 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



25 



was then widened, giving better results. It is now- 
proposed to further increase the air gap between the 
pole pieces, and enclose the whole working side of the 
apparatus in an external shield or armature. This 
I will cause a stronger and more even field to pass 
I through the drum, or will make it possible to secure 
I the present strength of field with far less current. 



As preliminary work, several field strengths were 
tried, the weakest used gave practically no concen- 
trates, while the strongest took out nearly all the 
titaniferous material as well as the magnetite. As 
magnetite has a much higher magnetic permeability 
than ilmenite, there should be some strength of field 
at which the heads product obtained contains almost 




FIG. 3. 

SEP ARRTOR 
RUN DRY 




The only dry run that has been completely assayed 
as on a sample of sand containing about 57% metallic 
iron and 16 . 2% TiOg . It is probable that the major 
part of the titanium was in the form of ilmenite. 
Some may have occurred as rutile, and some no doubt 
was contained in minute grains of ilmenite enclosed 
in magnetite. Assuming that the titanium occurred 
as ilmenite (Fe Ti O3) the 16.2% of TiOg had com- 
bined with it 16.2 X 56|80 = 11.3% of iron, so the 



all the magnetite and still very little ilmenite. Unfor- 
tunately grains of ilmenite cannot be distinguished 
by the eye from grains of magnetite and assays for 
titanium in the heads and for iron in the tails should 
have been made to show what were the limiting am- 
perages for successful concentration. In the test in 
quest'on, this was impracticable and a current of seven 
amperes was used. 

The result from 52 lbs. of sand was 22 lbs. of heads 



FIG. ^ . 

SEPARATOR AS 
RUN WCT 




amount of iron capable of being magnetically separa- 
ted from the titanium would be only 57 . 0 — 1 1.3 = 
45.7%. If rutile (Ti02) was present the percentage 
of iron free from titanium may have been more. If 
much titanium was enclosed in magnetite the free 
iron may have been less. 



assaying 70.46% of metallic iron and 1.91%, of TiOa 
and 30 lbs. of tails assaying 45.30%, of metallic iron 
and 23 . 30% of TiOg . This works out to a recovery 
in the heads of 65% of the total free iron, the heads 
carrying less than 1|16 of the titanium. A consider- 
ably better recoverjJr than this could have been ob- 



26 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



tahied with a slightly higher amperage and no harm 
done to the product as iron ore having 2.5% of TiOj 
or under is not abjected to by blast furnace people. 

A screen analysis of 43} lbs. of tails from a some- 
what similar dry run showed: — 

(1) Remaining on an SO mesh sieve 9 J lbs. 

(2) Remaining on a 100 me.sh sieve 27| lbs. 

(3) Passing through a 100 mesh sieve .... .5| lbs. 
Assays of these three sizes showed: 

Fe% Si 02% Ti02 and Al2()3% 

Over 80 mesh 35 1.5.0 3.5 

80 to 100 mesh 42 4.. 5 3,5 

Under 100 mesh .... 60 1.5 I.5 

The capacity of the machine dry is about 300 tt^s. 
per hour. Its resistance as used ^is 3 ohms, so the 
magnets with seven amperes passing required about 
150 watts or 1|5 H.P. It takes less than 1|5 H.P. to 
drive the cylinder, so the total consumption of power 
is less than one-half H.P. A large machine designed 
for economy of power could easily do equally good 
work with one-half or one third of the current and 
power per unit weight of sand, viz., from 100 to 1.50 
watt hours per 300 fts. At 10 cents per killowatt 
hour, this would amount to 7 to 10 cents per ton of 
sand. The capacity can probably be further increased 
by running any but very rich sands very fast so as 
to make a large amount of poor heads, and then clean- 
ing these heads by re-running them. 

Run wet, the machine will probably dupUcate the 
work it does dry, but the adjustments need more care- 
ful watching and the capacity is lower. Six wet runs 
on sands from Seven Islands gave heads containing 
1.10, 2.36, 2.30 1.48, 1.48, and 1.67% of TiO^ 
Prehmmary runs on each ore and numerous assays 
are necessary for the determination of the adjustments 
required. A wet run for the exhibit of the Quebec 
Government at the Liege Exhibition, which had to be 
done without assays or sufficient preliminary work, 
gave concentrates carrying 7.13%: of TiOa . This 
sand was practically identical with' that used in the 
six wet runs mentioned above, all of which gave very 
low titanium in the heads. The assays made after 
the test was completed, are as follows: — 

Heads Metallic Iron 64 31% 

TiOz 7.13%o • 

t ails Metallic Iron 44 . 95% 

Ti02 20.17% 

Heads 27 lbs. 12 oz. 

Middles (not exhibited) 3 lbs. 10 oz. 

Tails 27 lbs. 11 oz. 

61%, of the free iron was got into the heads with 
about 1|5 of the titanium. The sand was the same as 
that used in the dry run previously described, and is 
practically identical with that which gave such excel- 
lent results when preliminary assays were made. 

The capacity of the separator wet is about 100 fts. 
per hour. About 0.02 cu. ft. of water per minute is 
re(iuired to reduce the damp sand to a pulp, and about 
0.10 cu. feet per minute to wash the tails from the 
heads. Sometimes water Is used for cleaning the heads 
and tails from the bottom of the cylinder and some- 
times not. The water could easily be pumped back 
and used over and over. The total power used in the 
present small machine when running wet costs on an 
average about 50 cents per ton of sand, but on a large 
machine this could certainly be cut down to one half 
or one ciuartcr that amount. The separator either 
wet or dry is usually run at 87 revolutions per minute. 
The amperages used range from 3 to 11, 5 and 7 being 
the commonest. 

The machine used in the a])ove tests was designed 
by Dr. J. B. Porter, Professor of .Mining Engineering, 
and built in the shoj) of the; Mining Department of 



McGill University. The work detailed was all done 
under his advice and general direction, but great credit 
IS due Mr. R. A. Chambers, a former student, for tests 
which he carried out on the Seven Islands sand. The 
author is responsible for the more recent work and 
thanks are due Mr. J. Obalski, the Mining Engineer of 
the Province of Quebec, for material. The chemical 
analyses were nearly all made by Mr. M. L. Hersey 
Provincial Analyst, by authority of Mr. Obalski. The 
main part of the sand was furnished by Mr. William 
Robertson, of Montreal, but the Seven Islands sand 
came from Mr. Ganong, of Quebec. The wet and dry 
tests last made were carried out at the suggestion ot 
Mr. Obalski and samples of all products were included 
in the Canadian Exhibit at Liege this year. 

On the conclusion of the paper the author exhibited 
a set of samples of the sand sent to Liege, as follows:— 

1. Original sand. 

2. Heads of dry concentration. 

3. Tails dry concentration. 

4. Heads of wet concentration. 

5. Middles of wet concentration. 

6 . Tails of wet concentration. 



THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S REPORTS ON 
ASBESTOS AND MICA. 

To The Editor: 

Sir,— On page 144 of your last issue you make cer- 
tam comments regarding the publications of this 
Department and concerning the relations existing 
between this Department and the Mines Branch, 
which are so misleading and indeed so far from the 
facts that I feel sure you will not hesitate to correct 
the wrong impression these remarks must give the un- 
informed reader by publishing in your next issue the 
facts of the case as viewed from the side of the Geo- 
logical Survey. 

The reports that have caused your remarks con- 
cerning the above-mentioned relations are those on 
mica and asbestos by Mr. Cirkel. Anyone not entirely 
acquainted with the facts and reading vour editorial, 
would certainly receive the impression that Dr. Haanel^ 
mspired by a happy idea, issued these bulletins and 
that the Geological Survey, not to be outdone, issued 
a sort of belated rival report. 

The actual circumstances of the case are, however, 
very different. The bulletins on mica and asbestos 
by Mr. Cirkel do not give, and do not profess to give, 
any original information concerning these subjects. 
They are simply (see Mr. Cirkel's letter and intro- 
duction) a "collection" of "data and general infor- 
mation," and they purport to be nothing else. More 
than half the report is based, and partly acknowledged 
to be based, on information supplied in the reports 
of our Department— reports and papers by Dr. Ells 
(see footnote) and a bulletin by the same gentleman 
(1903-04) of which no mention is made. That part 
of the reports which is not practically Dr. Ells', deals 
with (a) mining in foreign countries, (b) details of 
mming machinery, and (c) the cost of mining. With- 
out the slightest wish to decry Mr. Cirkel's work, I 
may say that the Geological Survey has generally 
left these three subjects alone. As to the mining 
in foreign countries, we find it more convenient to 
simply give references; as to details of machinery, the 
mining men, rather naturally, object to their " ideas 
being given away to competitors, and we make a 
point of publishing no information that could harm 
legitimate j^rivate enterprise; and, finally, as to the 
cost of production, experience has shown that Govern- 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



27 



ment reports dealing, except in a very general way, 
with these matters are apt to be turned to account by 
unscrupulous company promoters who are able to 
put their own version on almost any statement of the 
kind that may be made. 

In this connection, I may say that certain figures 
in one of these bulletins have already raised consider- 
able trouble, as you, in your position, probably know 
better than I. 

As regards the supposed friction between the Mines 
Branch and the Survey, you do not seem to be aware 
that Mr. Cirkel's mica report was revised, edited, and 
to a considerable extent re-written, by the editor of 
this Department, who, at Dr. Haanel's request, was 
permitted to help the Mines Branch in this publication. 
Dr. Haanel has since signified, in a letter to the Minister, 
his favourable appreciation of the manner in which 
this work was carried out. 

I remain, Sir, 

Yours truly, 

ROBERT BELL. 

Asbestos, 1886, Geological Survey Report . 

1887- 88, Geological Survey Report. 

1888- 89 Mineral Resources of Quebec. 

1890-91, Papers in Mining Review and Ottawa 
Naturalist. 
Mica, 1894 Bull. Geol. Soc, U.S. 
1899 Vo. 12 Ann. Rep. 



RECENT MINERAL DISCOVERIES ON WINDY ARM 

A timely and interesting report has just been issued by 
Mr. R. G. McConnell, B.A., of the Geological Survey of Canada, 
on the subject of the mineral discoveries which have recently 
created so much attention on Windy Arm of Tagish Lake, in 
the Yukon. The principle ore deposits, the report states, occur 
on the West side of Windy Arm, a southerly branch of Lake 
Tagish. Windy Arm joins Tagish Lake near its head, and ex- 
tends south for a distance of 12 miles, its course being nearly 
parallel to that of Bennett Lake. Two sheets of water enclose 
an area of mountainous country about 8 miles, and in this region 
the most recent discoveries have been made. Communication 
to the new mining district is afforded by the White Pass & Yukon 
Railway, and it is stated that a railway can easily be built from 
the Cariboo crossing, along the shores of Lake Nares, Tagish 
I^ake and Windy Arm, to Conrad City. There is also a second 
feasible route from Log Cabin station. 

The report states that: "The mineralized area on Windy 
Arm is situated a few miles north of the great granite area of 
the Coast Range. The rocks outcropping along the lower part 
of Windy Armconsist of a wide band of crystalline limestone, 
followed, going south, by hard slates and shales passing in places 
into feldspathic quartzites and associated .with dark and gray 
cherts and red jaspers. This clastic series is cut off and replaced 
about five miles above the mouth of the Arm by an eruptive 
rock of a porphyritic character, exposures of which outcrop along 
the shores of the Arm for a distance of about five miles. The 
porphyrite is followed, going southward, by strongly cleaved 
dark argillites and fine-grained tufaceous sandstones alternating 
with bands of conglomerates and limestone. These rocks are 
less altered than the slates and associated rocks north of the 
porphyrite area but no data sufficient to determine the age were 
obtained. They are cut off a few miles south of Windy Arm by 
the great granite mass of the Coast Range. 

The porphyritic rock separating the two series of clastic 
rocks constitutes the principal metalliferous formation of the 
district. It crosses from Windy Arm to Bennett lake in a band 
about four miles in width and also extends some distance east 
of Windy Arm. It has not been studied in detail, but is evident- 
ly somewhat complex in character. 

A granite area about three miles in width occurs on Lake 
Bennett north of the porphyrites and associated rocks. The 
granite is separated from the latter on the lake shore by a narrow 
band of slates and limestones, but, further inland, comes in con- 
tact with them. It is a medium grained, gray rock similar to 
the Coast Range granites and probably belonging to the same 
period of igneous activity. 

The largest and most persistent veins so far discovered occur 
in the porphyrite area. They are not, however, confined to this 
formation, a few occurring in the granite and some, also, in the 



slates. The veins occupy typical clean-cut fissures with regular 
walls often slickensided and grooved. They are comparatively 
narrow but as a rule exhibit remarkable persistency in strike. 
The Uranus vein, with a width of from one to four feet, has 
been traced by small openings and surface showings for a dis- 
tance of about 1,500 feet and may extend much farther, while 
the Montana vein, with a maximum width of five feet in the 
portion explored, has apparently been cut at a distance of 1,600 
feet from the main workings and may also of course be very 
much longer. The Venus No. 2 lead has a width of nine feet at 
two openings about 400 feet apart, and must extend for long 
distances iii both directions. Numerous other veins such as 
the M. and M., the Joe Petty and Venus No. 1 are traceable by 
surface outcrops for several hundred feet. Portions of all 
these veins are concealed by slide rocks and their full length 
was not ascertained. 

The dip and strike of the veins are exceedingly irregular. 
The Montana vein strikes N. 43 W., while the direction of Venus 
No. 2 is about N. 42 E. The M. and M. strikes nearly north 
and south. The clips are nearly all to the south and west and 
vary in steepness from 12° in the Montana to 50° in Venus No. 1. 

The gangue in all the veins is mainly quartz. Single and 
multiple lines of interlocking quartz crystals is a constant feature. 
In a few instances, portions of the veint filling consist of alter- 
nating layers of quartz and country rock. The latter, in such 
cases, is always hea\'ily mineralized, usually with iron, and 
weathers to a rusty colour. 

The list of metallic minerals contained in the veins as iden- 
tified in the field, and in the laboratory of the Survey from speci- 
mens brought back by the writer includes the following: — 
Native Silver, Argentite, Stephanite, Freibergite, Pyrargyrites 
Galena, Tetrahedrite, Chalcopyrite, Native Copper, Malachite, 
,\zurite. Iron Pyrite, Arsenopyrite, Pyrrhotite and Sphalerite. 

The general outlook for the camp is considered exceedingly 
promising, and its opening up marks an important event in the 
mining history of the country. 

The mining conditions are not unfavourable. Most of the 
veins are situated at distances of from half a mile to four miles 
from the lake and at elevations of from twelve hundred feet to 
three thousand six hundred feet above it. Aerial tramways 
can therefore easily be constructed for the carriage of the ores 
to the lake shore for concentration and can also be used to take 
supplies to the mines. Miners' wages during the past season 
amounted to $3.50 per day for eight, hours work, and ordinary 
labourers obtained the same amount for ten hours work. The 
cost of supplies, considering the short distance to the seaboard, 
and the almost continuous rail connection, ought to be moderate. 
The climate, while severe during a portion of the year, will have 
little effect on mining operations. 



THE MINING CONVENTION AT TORONTO. 

The Mining Convention to consider what changes should 
be made in the Ontario Mining Laws met at Toronto on the r2th 
of December and continued in session for four days. The re- 
sult of the deliberations was the adoption of the appended 
resolutions, though some of them were not adopted by any 
means unanimously, and several of them were adopted after 
many delegates had left the meeting. Mr. W. D. Mac- 
pherson, barrister, of Toronto, was elected Chairman of the 
convention, and Fred. A. Fenton, of the same city, secretary. 

(1) . That it is the opinion of this convention that there 
should be only one mining law for the whole Province. 

(2) . That all lands belonging to the Crown, whether surveyed 
or unsurveyed, and whether valuable for timber or not, should 
at all times be open for exploration and sale, and that no lands 
should at any time or under any circumstances be withdrawn 
from exploration or sale by order in Council or otherwise, and 
that when discovery of mineral be made on a timber limit 
valuable for pine, of sufficient value to warrant mining opera- 

, tions, a location title be issued to the discoverer, so that he may 
have a negotiable interest in his discovery, and that after such 
location the owner of the timber berth be given a limited time, 
not to exceed three years, in which to remove the pine, after 
which date the ownership to the mineral discovery shall be ab- 
solute, subject only to the working conditions under the mining 
act. 

(3) . That the district known as New Ontario, and any other 
section of the Province of Ontario which is or may become 
valuable for minerals, should be formed into recording districts, 
with a recording office in each district, and that all applications 
for mineral shall be made to the recording office of the district 
in which the mineral is found. That each recording office shall 
have on file all applications and all records for its division, 
and also maps showing all locations, which shall be open for 
inspection by the public. 

(4) . That it would be injudicious to provide for payment of 
any royalty or for a special tax applicable to the mining mdustry. 



28 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



(5) . That any licensee may stake out a location without first 
making a discovery of mineral thereon, under stringent working 
conditions to be decided by this meeting. 

(6) . All locations shall be forty acres, except in the case of 
fractional locations. In unsurveyed territory the location .should 
consist of a fractional part of a lot as mentioned in subsection 
2 of section 18 of the Regulations of Mining Divisions govern- 
ing the Temiskaming Mining Division. 

licensee may stake out a mining location on 
behalf of himself, or any other licen.see, .sciuare in shape and 
the bearings of the outlines thereof shall be due north and due 
south, and due east and due west astronomically. Such 
location shall be 20 chains in length and 20 chains 
in width, containing 40 acres. And the licensee shall 
plant at each of the four corners of such location a post of 
wood in the order following, viz.: No. 1, at the north east cor- 
ner; No. 2, at the south east corner; No. 3, at the southwest 
corner; No. 4, at the northwest corner; the number in each 
case to be upon the side of the post turned towards the post 
which follows in the order in which they are named • and if one 
or more corners of a location fall in any situation' where the 
nature or shape of the ground renders the planting of a post 
or posts impracticable, such corner or corners may be indicated 
by placing at the nearest suitable point a witness post, which in 
that case shall contain the same marks as those prescribed 
herein for corner posts, together with the letters W.P and 
indication ot the bearing and distance of the site of the true 
corner from such witness post. And the licensee shall also 
plant a post of wood 6 feet southwest of the northeast corner 
post, to be called the recording post. And such recording post 
shall have four faces at least six inches wide, and shall be at 
least four feet above ground. Where there are standing trees 
upon a mining location so staked out the licensee shall blaze 
the trees and cut the underbrush along the boundary lines of 
the location about two feet wide. Where there are no standino- 
trees the licensee shall mark the boundary lines of the loc:tUon 
by planting pickets or stakes thereon, or by erecting thereon 
monuments of earth or rock, not less than two feet diameter 
at the base and a^, least two feet high, so that th^ lines can be 
distinctly seen. The licensee, on behalf of himself or on behalf 
ot any other licensee for whom he may have staked the location 
shall nail upon the recording post of such location the staking 
record, in which he shall insert the date of staking. * 
(8). That all locations shall be recorded within 15 davs 
alter staking if within 10 miles from recording office, but that 
one day additional be allowed for each additional 5 miles 

19). Ihat^ during the period allowed between the date of 
staking and the date on which the said claim is required to be 
recorded in accordance with the preceding resolution the 
licensee first staking the same shall be entitled to full possess on 
S ;e;::uheZf^^ *° ^^^^ ■■■-^^^^ fuHy preserved 

«10n h?lVtT,af .li'^ensee may be required to expend at least 
WOO m actual mining work during 90 days immediately succeed- 
JjanZv Fe^ ' -^^^l^d'^S f™'" S"ch computation the monSs 

dui thP^iS ^''^ ^^'^"^ ^ similar amount 

u^u succeeding years, or prior thereto, but such 
expenditure shall be computed at the rate of $3 per day for 
each days work performed by a grown man, and that an affi- 
S'^H.P™'''/;^ such expenditure be filed with the recorder wifhin 
sJch'TxpenSuJe.^ ''''' ^""^^'^^ P^^™- -ch 

or ~-*V^°'' ''"""'^ adjoining five locations or less held by one 
Itals ai such dev']^ principally valuable fofba e 

onfo^nSreTf'tht ""^ ^^"''^^ 

(12). That, whereas, there are numerous deposits of eood 
ron ores in Ontario which at present are not bei g worked be 
cause our furnaces to a great extent use United S ates oS 
Sant't""he o,'e.nr'r"'"""^f ^'^^^-^ Gove^nm"^ 

admi^L'^^fl^JJ;!;-/;— 
smelting or treatment of iron ores. 

•ill niiVlJ^'''^' P'''^^ of '"'"cral lands should be uniform 

tfrHtorv Jnd' '''''' »2 '^0 '"^cre in surveyed 

territory and »2 per acre in unsurveyed territory. ^ 

lhat the Department of Lands and Mines should 

ssprlji;ir:;;Sr:r\h;^-:^:^s ^ -^^^ 

a simp melluKl for Ih,. n.gistrnti<,n, dissc,liiti<,n n d <S,m^^ 

■ (I?) n;;;'"i'\r^ p-viZi " 

07). ih, t all alhdavils re(|uired under the Mines Act mav 
be sworn to b.-lor,. any Justice of the Peace, Notary Pu 1 c 
Ummissioners lor taking affidavits in the Ili-li Court 



or any 



agent appointed under the Mines Act or any Crown Lands 

agent. 

(18.) That in the opinion of this meeting th(! province of 
Ontario should erect a smelter and refinery capable of .smelting 
treating and refining the silver-cobalt ores, and should make 
provision for the treating and refining of the copper and nickel 
ores ot the province. 

(19) . That although in the opinion of this convention of 
()ntario miningmen, it is desirable that a.ssistance be given by 
the Dorninion {government in the way of granting of bounti^ 
on pig iron smelted in the Dominion, we wish to strongly 
protest against the present system of paying bounties on pig 
iron smelted rom foreign ores, and ask that the same be dis- 
continued when the present law expires in June, 1907 but 
that the bounty on pig iron made from domestic ore be placed 
at $3 per ton for the next five years. 

(20) . It is recommended that any miner' .s license issued 
shall entitle the holder thereof to stake and hold mineral loca- 
tions upon Crown lands in all parts of this province. That all 
such licensees shall assume the responsibility of as.sisting in 
extinguishing, and at all times endeavouring to prevent fore.st 
fires on Crown lands, subject to a penalty of not less than .«20 
in cas^e of refusal to so act. That such lieen.ses .shall run for one 
year from the date thereof, and shall not be transferable. That 
no person, or joint stock company, shall be recognised as having 
any right or interest in or to any mineral location unless he or 
It shall have an unexpired miner's license. 

(21) That the northerly 6,400 acres of the Gillies timber 
imit^(\vhich comprises 64,000 acres), be conveyed and granted 
by the Province to a company to be incorporated with $900 000 
capital, in $1 shares, 300,000 of such shares to be divided 'pro 
rata tree of charge, but fully paid up, among the licen.sees of 
tne lemiskammg mining division, licensed prior to December 
9, 1905, 300,000 fully paid up shares to be given free to the 
Province of Ontario, and 300,000 shares to be sold at par to 
citizens of Ontario, who apply for the same, and deposit ten 
per centum of such price at the time of making such application 
in order to secure money to purchase the pine thereon and carry^ 
on development operations, and to make suitable reward to 
parties who know of the existence of minerals on the said lands 
such treasury shares to be allotted equally per capita in the 
event of over-subscription. That each section of shareholders 
be entitled to the exclusive right of electing three directors to 
constitute a board of mine directors for the company. 

Some amendments were offered to this resolution but after 
discussion it was decided that both the resolution and the amend- 
ments should be laid on the table. The general opinion expres- 
sed was that the problem is one of the most difficult the Govern- 
ment has to deal with, but that some satisfactory solution 
would be arrived at. 

(22) That the Government be recommended to proceed at 
once with the re-survey of all townships where marks are obliter- 
ated, and also survey all valuable mineral lands in unsurveyed 
territoiy, and that the corners of all sections be marked w-ith 
iron posts. 

(23) . That the Government should procure expert evidence 
as to the advisability of fully testing the Thunder Bay silver 
di-stnct by sinking through the silicious schists of the Animikie 
formation, into the lower Huronian strata, for the purpose of 
demonstrating the value of veins in the lower formation. 

(24) . That any applicant for a mining location shall at the 
expiration of the time for his development work file wth the 
recorder at least two affidavits of practical miners that he has 
complied with the regulations, otherwise the claim shall be 
considered abandoned. 

(25) . That no licensee shall stake out or apply for more 
than two mining locations principally valuable for precious 
metals, or more than four locations principally valuable for 
base metals, within a radius of six miles thereof during any one 
calendar year, either in his own name, or in the name of any 
other licensee. 

(26) . That in the opinion of this conyention it would be 
advisable for the Ontario Legislature to offer prizes for the 
demonstration of satisfactory methods for the treatment of 
refractory ores for which no satisfactory method is now in use 
or known in this country. 

(27) . That the section of the Municipal Act givino- town- 
ship councils ownership of minerals on concession and side lines 
be abolished, and the mineral thereon should be dealt for direct 
with the Crown Lands Department, the same title to be issued 
as is issued for the adjoining land. 

(28) . That contests arising regarding the location and 
ownership of mining claims should be decided by a mining com- 
mission sitting judicially at various mining centres, whose de- 
cisions shoud be subject to appeal to the Court of Appeal only. 

1 hat this convention ask the Go\{-rnment to consider 
tlie (piestion of lands from which the prospector is debarred 
on account of the impossibility of perfecting title, and of larger 
mineral areas held idle, and devise some remedy if possible 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



29 



BRITISH COLUMBIA MINING IN 1905. 

The Nelson Daily News, in a special issue dated January 1st, 
publishes a most exhaustive review (largely compiled, we under- 
stand, by Mr. E. Jacobs, editor of the British Columbia Mining 
Record) "of mining in British Columbia during the past year. In 
considering the mineral production made, it is estimated that an 
increase in vield to the value of nearly $2,500,000.00 will be 
shown, and m fact the year will be a record one in respect to 
production. The following comparative table is given of the 
yield of 1904, and estimated returns of 1905. 

The next following table shows the respective totals of value 
of minerals produced in 1904 and 1905: — 

1904 1905 Increase. Decrease. 

Gold, placer Sl,115..300 $1,110,000 $5,300 

Gold, lode 4,589.608 4,640,000 $50,392 

Total gold $5,704,908 .$5,750,000 

Silver 1.719,516 2,045,000 325,484 

Copper 4,578.037 5,430,000 851,963 

Lead 1.421,874 2,368,000 946,126 

Zinc 320,000 320,000 

Total metalliferous, . $13,424,335 $15,913,000 

Coal 3,760,884 3,090,000 $670,884 

Coke 1,192,140 1.210,000 17,860 

BuUding materials, etc. . . 600,000 750,000 150,000 

Total non-metalliferous $5,553,024 .$5,050,000 $676,184 

Total increase $2,661 ,825 

Less decrease 676,184 

Net increase $1,985,641 

Being about 10 .4 per cent. 



SUMM.\RY. 



Metalliferous. . . 
Non-Metalliferous 



1904 
13,424,3.36 
5,553.024 



1905 
$15,913,000 
5,050,000 



Total production 



$18,977,359 $20,963,000 



In calculating the values of the several minerals to obtain 
the totals shown in the foregoing table, placer gold has been 
taken as worth $20 per oz., lode gold at $20.67 per oz., silver at 
60 cents per oz. less 5 per cent; copper at 15 cents per lb., lead 
at 4.6 cents per lb. lesss 10 per cent.; zinc has been averaged at 
$24 per ton, coal valued at $3 and coke at $5 per ton of 2,240 lbs. 

The quantities of minerals produced were as under: — 



Gold, placer — Ozs 
Gold, lode — Ozs , 



Total gold— Ozs 



1904 
55,765 
222,042 

277,807 



1905 
55,500 
224,490 

279,990 



Increase, 



2,448 



2,183 



Decrease. 
265 



SUver— Ozs 3,222 481 3,587.719 365,238 

Copper— Lbs 35,710,128 36 200,000 480,872 

Lead— Lbs 36,646,244 57,200,000 20,553,756 

Zinc— Tons 13..330 13,330 

Coal— Tons of 2,240 lbs. . 1,253,628 1.030,000 223,628 

Coke— Tons of 2,240 lbs . , 238,426 242,000 3,574 

The features of the year have been, briefly, the great in- 
crease in the copper and gold output of the Boundary District, 
which very nearly carries a million tons; the increase in silver- 
lead production, and the development of the zinc mining in- 
dustry. 

A special article is contributed to this issue by Mr. G. O. 
Buchanan, on the "Lead Situation," in which it is stated that 
the production for the calendar year (December being estimated) 
is 28,636 tons, divided as follows: — 



Hall Mining & Smelting Co (Nelson) 
Canadian Smelting Works (Trail) . , . 
Elsewhere in B. C 



Lbs. Lead. 
17,785,862 
12,785,901 
11,206,169 

Exported in ore to Europe 15,525,835 

57,272,767 

Equal \ 28,636 tons 

Output, 1904 20,000 tons 

Increase 8,636 tons 

Mr. Buchanan states that except for the blank in shipments 
from the St. Eugene caused by damage to their works by fire 
(the months of October and November having been practically 
lost), the output for 1905 would have gone close to that of the 
banner year, 1900, which was 31,679 tons. 



For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1905, the returns to the 
department of trade and commerce for bounty purposes show 
as follows: — 

Lbs. Lead. 

Delivered to B. C. Smelters 33,704,932 

Exported to Europe 2 1 ,972 ,999 

Total 55,676,931 

E<iual to 27,838 tons. 

Bounty earned, home smelted lead $240,058.71 

Bounty earned, exported lead 97,157.30 

Total $337,216.01 

For the year ending June 30, 1904, the figures were: — 

Lead production 13,397 tons. 

Bounty earned $195,283.92 

The term for which a bounty was payable upon lead in ore 
exported to Europe ended on June 30, 1905, and a proposition 
for the extension of the term was not favorably considered by 
the government. 

On November 29, 1904, lead was quoted in London at £12 
12s. 6d., and the rate of bounty payable was reduced, the rate 
of diminution being 1.3579 cents per 100 pounds of lead for each 
advance of one shilling and three pence above £12 10s., the 
whole bountv being wiped out by 57 of such advances. 

The price went to £13 3s. 9d. on January 6, fell to £11 17s. 
6d. on March 3, rose to £12 lis. 3d. on April 4, and from that 
time has steadily climbed until £16 was reached on November 29, 
and the extinction of bounty payments, for the time being, was 
accomplished. 

On December 12, £17 8s. 9d. A'as reached, but at the moment 
of writing this, the quotation stands at £17 2s. 6d. 

The extremes of variation for the last five years have been: 
1900— September 15 £18 0 0 

1902— Januarv 14 10 5 0 

1903— March 12 13 15 0 

August 16 10 18 9 

1905— December 12 17 8 9 

That lead will remain permanently above £16 is not to be 
expected, but it is probable that we have seen the last of £12 lead. 
The predominant influence of the American Smelting & Refining 
Company, not so much in favor of an extremely high price, as of a 
steady price, is beginning to be internationally felt, and there is 
beyond that, universal testimony to the fact that the legitimate 
demand for lead has overtaken the supply, that the demand is 
growing and bound to grow, and the sources of fresh supplies 
are not in sight . 

Of our home-smelted product the electrolytic refinery at 
Trail is now treating 50 tons per day, or at the rate of 18,000 
tons per annum. At the present moment the refinery is busy 
with orders for Canadian consumption, and it is probable that 
we can count the Canadian market as good for, from this time 
onwards, 18,000 tons per annum. 

The product of the Trail refinery in both silver and lead 
exceeds in purity any hitherto produced upon a commercial 
scale, and both metals command a premium in competition with 
the product of other refineries. 

The year has introduced an era in the provision of lead 
smelting facilities. In the early spring the Sullivan company's 
new smelter went into blast at Marysville in East Kootenay. 

This smelter has two stacks of a capacity of 100 tons per 
day (only one of which has yet been in use) each, and the ap- 
pointments and machinery embody the most modern features. 

With commendable enterprise this company installed as a 
part of their plant a Huntington-Heberlien outfit of ovens and 
pots for ore roasting. 

While nothing as to results has been given out by the com- 
pany, the fact is patent that the smelter has run almost con- 
tinuously with no ore supply except that afforded by their own 
mine, a grade of ore with some reputation as difficult, from a 
smelting standpoint. 

That the object lesson has not been lo.st is evidenced by the 
fact that at both the Hall Mines and Trail smelters, similar roast- 
ing plants are under erection. 

The Hendryx smelter at Pilot Bay after nine years of idle- 
ness is undergoing renovation at the hands of the Canada Metal 
Company, and it is announced that the lead stack will soon be 
in commission. 

This latter company, of which C. Fernau, Esq., M.I.M.E., 
is the manager, and which has its head office at Nelson, and 
which has almost completed at Frank, Alta., a massive establish- 
ment for the treatment of zinc ores, proposes to have also a lead 
stack at an early date at Frank. This multiplication of smelters 
and introduction of metallurgical economies, should certainly 
foreshadow better treatment rates for the producer at an early 
date . 

The subject of zinc will no doubt be fully dealt with else- 
where in this review, but it may be mentioned here that some 
profitable disposition of the increasing quantities of zinc ore 
developed in connection with lead mining in the Slocan and 



30 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Ainsworth camps, had become the most serious problem con- 
I renting the mine owner. 

The problem has been attacked from all sides, by local 
enterprise in the installation of separating plants, by foreign 
capital in the erection of the magnificent works at Frank and 
by commission of enquiry under the direction of the most em- 
inent living specialists, employed by the Dominion Govern- 
ment. 

As items of special interest we have room for but few. 
The long tunnel on the Rambler-Cariboo is scheduled to 
reach the ore body (at least the place where it ought to be) 
on May 1. Ore from stringers recently cut has shown values 
similar to those ior which the shipments from the upper work- 
ings were framed. 

The Monitor and Ajax fraction mine after a prolonged 
suspension of production has again entered the list of shippers, 
and Its mammoth and completely equipped concentrating mill 
at Rosebery is in successful operation. 

In the Ferguson camp the Silver Cup mine ha.s large quanti- 
ties of ore m sight, and is ready to ship heavily. 

The La Plata Mines on Kokanee creek (we once spoke 
familiarly of them as the Molly Gibson) have concentrating 
works installed, and a bright future outlined. 

A question of "apex rights" growing out of the 1892 Mineral 
Act, of which the contestants have been J. M. Harris of the 
Reco mine, and the Byron N. White Co., has resulted in much 
prosperity to the legal, and mining expert fraternities, and to a 
decision which for the present upholds the apex rights of the 
Byron N. White Co. 

The Ivanhoe, after holding for some years a place near the 
head of the procession as a shipper, has paused to take breath 
and recover its ore bodies. 

The old time Blue Bell, now in the hands of the Canada 
Metal Co., is being put in shape for heavy production, and will 
be an important factor in feeding the works at Pilot Bav and 
Frank. 

In the Slocan camp the "leasing system" has come to stay 
having proven profitable to both parties concerned and the 
Payne, Whitewater, Whitewater Deep, Wakefield, Lone Bache- 
lor, Hewitt, Emily Edith and a host of others are under 
operation on that basis. 

Extensive works for the corrosion of lead were established 
during the year in Montreal by the Carter White Lead Company. 
Ihe contract for their supply of pig lead for a term of years i.s 
held by the refinery at Trail. Their methods of corrosion is 
new and improved, and this coupled with the perfect freedom 
from adidteration of the lead from Trail has enabled them to 
put upon the market a grade of paint lead never equalled. The 
works_ are rushed with orders, and their requirements of raw 
material accordingly increased. 

Largely as the result of the persistent agitation begun and 
for the last seven years carried on in this district, the finance 
minister carried through Parliament at its last session a bill 
increasing the duty upon corroded lead from 5 to 30 per cent. 

At a sitting of the Tariff Commission held in Nelson in 
September, interested parties were heard upon the subject of 
an increase in the duty upon other lead products (including pig). 

The Tariff Commission is expected to report at the coming 
session. 



COAL NOTES. 

ALBERTA. 

_ It is reported that the Western Canadian Collieries Company 
IS, since the new washer has been installed at Lille, now produc- 
ing a very fine quality of coke. This is the first coalwasher to 
be installed m Alberta. It is of the Luhrigtype, with a capacity 
of over 700 tons a day. f J 

The Canadian-American Coal & Coke Company recently 
commenced working on the principle seam of the mine, which 
has been abandoned since April last, on account of fire. It is 
proposed to increase the working force of the mine by the em- 
ployment of 100 more miners, as it has proven difficult to main- 
tain a supply sufl'icient to meet the demands of the C.P.R. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

The Official Gazette, in a recent issue publishes the following 
list constituting a board of examiners under the Coal Mines 
Regulation Act for the current year. Cumberland collieries- — 
Appointed by the owners, Charles Matthews; alternates, David 
Walker, .John Combs. Appointed by th(! Lieutenant-Governor 
in Council, .John Kesley. J':iected by the miners, James Reid- 
alternates, 'J'liomas Rii)lcy, Jos(?i)h Ilorbuiy. ' 

J' or th(! J<;xt(!nsion colliery: Ajiixjinted by tht; owners, 
•James Sliarj); alttirnatcs, Alex. Hryden, Alex. Shaw. Appointed 
by the Liculcnant-G()V(?inor in (Council, W. G. Simpson. I^lected 
by the m in(!r,s, 'I'homas Doherty; alternates, Wm. Andenson 
Benj. Berto. ' 



rpi, " Nanaimo colliery:— Appointed by the owners. 

Ihonias Mills; alternates, George Wilkinson, Charles Graham 
Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in (Council, 'i'homas 

ju^-j h,^^""^ . ''^ ^^"^ "'iners, George Moore; alternates. 
John R. McKenzie, George John.son. 

iir-T Michel colliery:— Appointed by the owners, A. R 

Wikson; alternates, Wm. Powell, Thos. CorkiU. Appointed by 
the J.ieutenant-Governor in Council, Evan Evans. Elected by 
the mmers, James Wylie; alternates, Sidney Bert, Joseph Thomas. 
r^ Creek colliery :— Appointed by the owners 

David Martin; alternates, Andrew Colville, John Hunt. Appoin- 
ted by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, John McCliment 
Elected by the miners, J. H. Suggett; alternates, Wm. Moore 
Chas. Webber. " ' 

Coal mining generally on Vancouver Island is now again in 
a pro.sperou.s condition. At Cumberland No. 7 mine has been 
well opened up, and is producing a fair tonnage of anthracite 
discovered some three or four years ago. During recent 
developments a serious fault was encountered, but this was 
pas,sed through in due course, and excellent coal again reached 
During the year the buildings destroyed at No. 4 have been re- 
erected, and a series of large shops have also been built at Union 
Bay. 

It is reported that the Carbonado colliery will probably be 
closed dovvn temporarily before the end of January. The com- 
pany find it is much more economical to operate the Coal Creek 
and Michel collieries at the full limit, in order to supply the 
rnarket requirements. It is estimated that the Carbonado col- 
liery does not pay to operate when the output is less than 600 
tons daily. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

Two promising seams of coal, one of 5 feet wide, were re- 
cently discovered at the Smith mine, at Maccan. The recently 
organized Eastern Coal Company, operating this property 
contemplate installing screening and other machinery immed- 
iately. 

The Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co. are making preparations 
for the opening of a new colliery at Sydney mines to be known 
as "Sydney No. 4." This colliery will be opened about a mile 
north of the present Sydney No. 3. The new collierj' will be 
one of the largest operated by the Nova Scotia Co., and it is 
the intention to operate it by electricity entirely. In every 
other respect, also, the very best and latest methods wiU be adop- 
ted. 

The Inverness Railway & Coal Company is sinking test 
pits preparatory to putting down a new shaft about half a mile 
from the present bankhead. 



THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

The eighteenth winter meeting of the above Society was 
held m Ottawa on December 27th, 28th and 29th. The following 
papers were read; — 

A New Species of Soda-alumina Pyroxene. By S. Weid- 
m.m, Madison, Wis. 

A Dike of Mica-Peridotite from Fayette Co., Southwestern 
Penn. By J. F. Kemp, New York City. 

Origin of Leached Phosphates. By C. H. Hitchcock, Han- 
over, N.H. 

Bibliography of the Geology, Mineralogy and Paleontology 
of Brazil. (Read by title). By John C. Branner, Stanford Uni- 
versity, Cal. 

The Peninsula of Calabria in its Tectona-Geographic and 
Geodynamic aspects. By William H. Hobbs, Madison, Wis. 

Torrential Deposits, and the Origin of Sandstones and Con- 
glomerates. By William H. Hobbs, Madison, AVis. 

Volcanic Craters of the Southwest. Bv Charles R Keves 
Socorro, N. Mex. - ' 

Hawaiian Notes. By C. H. Hitchcock Hanover, N.H. 

Western Sierra Madre of the State of Chihuahua, Mexico. 
By Edmund Otis Hovey, New Yorlc City. 

The Oldest Pre-Cambrian Rocks. (15 minutes). By C K 
Leith, Madison, Wis. • • 

Algonkian Formations of Northwestern Montana. By 
Charles D. Walcott, Washington, D.C. 

Paleography of St. Peter Time. (Read by title). By 
Charles P. Berkey, New York City. 

Notes on Arctic Geology. (Lantern Views; 20 minutes). By 
Albert P. Low, Ottawa, Can. 

The Lefroy, a Para.sitic, Glacier. (Lantern Views; 20 min- 
utes). By William H. Sherzer, Ypsilanti, Mich. 

Origin of the Massive Block Moraines in the Canadian 
Rockies and Selkirks. (Lantern Views; 20 minutes). By Will- 
iam H. Sherzer, Ypsilanti, Mich. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



31 



THE WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF COAL. 

The British Board of Trade statement for 1904, just receiv- 
ed gives the total coal production of the world (exclusive of 
brome lignites) as 790,000,000 tons of 2,240 lbs. Of this large 
amount the United States alone produces rather more than one- 
third, and Canada a little less than one-onehundredth. The 
following table shows the yield of each of the five largest coal 
producing countries for three years: — 



Years. 


United 
Kingdom . 


Germany. 


France. 


Belgium. 


U. States. 


1902 . . . 

1903 . . . 

1904 . . . 


Tons.* 
227,095,000 
230,334.000 
232,428,000 


Tons.t 
107,474,000 
116,638,000 
120,816,0001 


Tons.t 
29.365.000 
34,218.000 
33,838,0001 


Tons.t 
23.877.000 
23,797,000 
23,507,0001 


Tons.* 
269,277,000 
319,068,000 
314,563,000 



* Tons of 2.240 lbs. t Metric tons of 2.204 lbs. 

t Provisional figures. 



In the next table we give the production of the principal 
British colonies: — 





Aus- 








Cape of 




British 


tralian 


New 


Canada. 


Trans- 


Good 


Natal. 


India 


Common- 


Zealand. 




vaal. 


Hope. 






wealth. 












Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


7,438,000 


3,112,000 


1 ,420,000 


6,825,000 


2,012,000 


185,000 


714,000 



The consumption of coal per head of population in these 
colonies is shown in the next table, in which it will be noted that 
Canada leads, due, doubtless, to our cold climate. — 



Australian 


New 




Cape of 




Trans- 


Common- 


Zealand. 


Canada. 


Good 


Natal. 


vaal. 


wealth. 






Hope. 






Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


1.30 


1.71 


1.81 


0.29 


0.40 


1 .23 



DOMINION STEEL COMPANY IN 1905. 

The record made by the Dominion Steel Company the past 
j'ear has been very satisfactory. The total production of pig 
iron was 162,000 tons, of the open hearth steel furnaces 173,500 
tons, and of the rolling mills 47,000 tons. Of eightj^ pound steel 
rails, 44,000 tons have been already turned out. The produc- 
tion of coke amounted to 242,150 tons. 

Over half a million tons of coal was consumed by the com- 
pany in its different operations, as well as 380,184 tons of iron 
ore, 267,237 tons of limestone and dolomite, and 13,711 tons of 
gravel and sand. 

During the height of the season 4,000 men were employed 
by the company, and the pay roll exceeded 12,000,000. Per- 
haps the most important announcement that the company has 
to make is that it has advanced from being a mere purveyor of 
raw materials to the position of a producer of finished materials. 

From the United States, Spain and other foreign countries, 
the following minor supplies were drawn: 19,403 tons special 
iron ore, 1,2.57 tons manganese ore, 2,531 tons pyrites ore, 1,850 
tons Spiegel, ferro manganese, etc.; 3,450 tons fluorospar, 461 
tons calcined magnesite. During the greater part of the year 
two blast furnaces were in operation, but about the middle of 
November a third was blown in. The fourth will be kept in 
readiness to take the place of any of the other three that may 
require to go off for repairs. 

At the beginning of 1905 six open hearth furnaces were in 
operation. This number was gradually increased until the whole 
ten were in use in September and the remaining months of the 
year. 

As a result of tests. Dominion wire rods have practically 
captured the Canadian market, and importations have been 
reduced to a minimum. 



PLATINUM IN PLACE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

It is reported that ore, carrying 4 oz. of platinum to the ton, 
has been discovered on a claim on Bear Creek, Nicola district, 
B.C., these returns having been obtained from analyses made 
by Messrs. Baker & Sons, platinum refiners of NewYork. In 
this connection, a Mr. C. F. Law, of Vancouver, writes to the 
Engineering and Mining Journal as follows: — ■ 

"It may interest your readers to know that a discovery 
of platinum has been made in place, on Bear Creek, a tributary 
of the Tulameen river, in British Columbia. Baker & Co. re- 
port that a sample of ore, sent to them for assay, contains ap- 
proximately 4 oz': platinum per ton. This sample was taken 
by myself from an ore-shoot 4 ft. wide in a fissure vein. This 
was sampled by Thomas Kiddie, manager of the Crofton smelter, 
in British Columbia, and was found to contain: copper (wet), 
1.38%; silver, 20.83 oz.; gold, 2.64 oz. per ton from wall to 
wall without selection. The presence of platinum was not sus- 
pected, although the vein occurs in a known platinum district; 
and the same belt of rock in which the vein occurs has yielded 
platinum where eroded by the Tulameen river. The gangue is 
quartz, the ore itself being pyrite, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite, 
in schist close to the granite." 

"I was led to have this ore assayed for platinum by an arti- 
cle which appeared in your Journal some time ago, referring to 
platinum values having been found in the nickel-copper ores of 
Sudbuiy and the copper ores of the Rambler mine, Wyoming." 



ONTARIO MINING INTELLIGENCE. 



(From Our Own Corre.spondent.) 
h. case affecting the ownership of the Josephine iron mine, 
near Michipicoten Harbour, was recently argued before the Hon. 
F. Cochrane, Minister of Lands and Mines. Decision was reser- 
ved. Alois Goetz, a resident of Michigan, petitions to be de- 
clared, by right of discovery, the owner of the mine. The 
ownership of the property is also claimed by the Lake Superior 
Corporation as part of the land grant to the Algoma Central 
Railway. The latter has been for some years in possession of 
the mine on which extensive development work has been carried 
on. 

The Savage Cobalt Company, one of the new companies recent- 
ly organized to operate at Cobalt, has a 42 acre property at the 
south end of Peterson Lake. A shaft has been sunk 50 feet, 
where a rich vein has been struck, but some trouble having 
arisen from water a steam pumping plant has been installed, 
which will be in operation the first of the year and work con- 
tinued throughout the winter. The company has also erected 
necessary buildings on the property. A sample of 60 lbs. of 
ore sent to the School of Practical Science, Toronto, yielded a 
handsome return and ten veins of silver have been found on 
the territory so far prospected. 

The Cobalt Development Co. has acquired and paid for a 
silver-cobalt property in the township of Coleman and one in 
Bucke, and is negotiating for another in Coleman. It is proposed 
to work these properties directly the snow is off the ground 
in the spring. Stock is issued in shares of $100 and the pro- 
ceeds will be used in development. The directors are: — Messrs. 
Ewan Mackenzie, President, Toronto; William Dobie, General 
Manager and Treasurer, E. W. Gillett Co., Toronto; — Lamb, 
Cordova Mines, Ont.; E. I. Sifton, London, Ont. ; Perry 
L. Hobbs, Cleveland, Ohio; Thomas E. Aikenhead, 
Hardware Co.; Toronto; P. Maclnto.sh, Macintosh Food Co., 
Toronto; Henry D. McNaughton, Rochester, N.Y. ; George 
Stevenson, Toronto. G. D. Hardy is performing the duties of 
Secretary and Manager. 

Decision has been given in the case of Gaizer vs. Thompson, 
referred to in the December number of the Mining Review, 
as affecting Cobalt properties. A lease had been issued to Thomp- 
son, who held the property in trust for the Hudson's Bay and 
Temiskaming Mining Co. The Attorney General, to whom the 
case was referred, has decided that an action should be brought 
in the High Court of Justice to set aside the lease, which means 
that it is a case which should be investigated, and it will now 
go before the Courts on its merits. The ground on which it is 
sought to set aside the lease is that there was no valuable dis- 
covery of mineral. The case was argued by Mr. J. M. Clark, 
K.C. for Gaizer and Mr. E. F. B. Johnston, K.C. for Thompson. 

With reference to the possibility of finding diamonds in 
New Ontario, referred to recently, Dr. Bell, acting director of 
the Canadian Geological Survey, states that he does not believe 
that they will ever be discovered in Canada. 

A syndicate in which Toronto people are interested, is 
understood to have secured the right to use a German process 
for the treatment of Cobalt ores. The company has a capital 
of a million or over, and will erect reduction works in the Cobalt 
district at an early date. The difficulty with the Cobalt ores 
has been that there is no process known by which they could be 



32 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



refined so as to save all Iheii- constituents, and the New Jersey- 
Co., which has purchased a large proportion of the output 
has much of it on their hands untreated. The (ierinan proces.s 
is a secret one, but should it be a success, nuich low grade ore, 
now left on the dump, can be turned to account, while full 
value will be realized for the ores of high grades. In addition 
the smeltmg wdl be done in Canada and so add another industry.' 

The new iron field in Algoma, west of the Vermillion River, 
some 60 mdes from navigable water at Killarney, is stated to be 
from 30 to 40 miles long and second in importance only to the 
Mesaba range. The ore is partly Bessemer and contains only 
from 6 to 7 per cent, of phosphorus and 61 qer cent, of iron. 
Part ot it is in the imsurveyed territory and some is covered 
with valuable pine timber, which may give rise to difficultv 
similar -to that over the Gillies limits at Cobalt. With a rail- 
way to deep water the rate of freight to Cleveland and 
other lake ports would be about $1 a ton, which is consider- 
ably less than from Duluth. 

The McLeod claim at Cobalt has been purchased by B. B. 
Harlan, of Chicago, who has a gang of men working on it with 
very satisfactory results. 

Mr. Harold A. Wylie of Port Arthur, has closed an impor- 
tant deal for some iron lands near that town, which, it is under- 
stood, will soon be developed. 

Mr. A C. Boyce, M.P., is reported to have made a lucky 
strike at Cobalt, and to have realized profits amounting to 
from $50,000 to $100,000. 

The transfer of the Bruce mines to the Copper and Smelting 
Co. ot Ontario has been completed. The new company which is 
capitalized at $1,000,000, is largely English. Extensive opera- 
tions will be commenced, and these mines, which at one time 
produced copper of high grade, will again be the scene of great 
activity. 

Work has been commenced near Lake Wahnapitae on the 
extension of the James Bay Railway from Sudbury to Moose 
Mountain in the Township of Hutton. This will give an out- 
let for the rich iron ores found there. The freight charges on 
that contract will pay the whole of the fixed charges on the 
James Bay Railway from Toronto to Moose Mountain. 

The agreement entered into between the Nickel Copper 
Co. and the Hospfner Refining Co. for amalgamation has been 
ratified by both companies, and the latter has now been absor- 
bed by the former. 

The Toronto News thus hits off the recent mining conven- 
tion in that city, where harmony did not certainly prevail: 
"At the Mining Convention:— Moved and seconded, that the 
Government do everything possible for us and that we refuse 
to pay a royalty or anything else to the Government. Carried 
amid wild cheers." 

The Arsenical Ore Reduction Co. is developing its property 
at Grey's Siding, two miles north of Temagami, and has over 
50 men at work under Mr. Albert Smith, a New York eno-ineer 
The plant is being doubled. 

An iron pyrites property at Rib Take, in New Ontario, 
IS being opened up. A trial shipment has been sent to Buffalo. 
It belongs to Mr. Smallman, of London. 

Mr. J. M. Kilbourne, of Owen Sound, recently appeared 
before the tariff commission and asked to have the duty on 
cement increased 10 cents per barrel of 350 lbs. He stated 
that the cement manufacturing industiy in Canada represents 
a capital of $9,215,000 and gives employment to 10,000 people. 

The Wmdy Arm Mining Co., referred to in the December 
number of the Mining Review, is now fully organized. It 
IS coniposed of Toronto people, who have subscribed sufficient 
capital to develop the claim as soon as the snow goes in the 
spring. The Conrad mine in the same district, is claimed by 
Col. Conrad, a well known Montana miner, to be the richest in 
the world He says he has arranged to spend a million and 
a halt dollars m development and work will go on all winter. 
In running a cross cut the vein was struck again. Two more 
tramways will be built, and the White Pass and Yukon Railway 
will build a branch to Windy Arm. 

Some remarkably rich samples of gold were recently .shown 
at the Bureau oi Mines, Toronto, and which Mr. T. W. Gibson 
the director, pronounces to be the richest he has ever seen' 
They were in the possession of Mr. Anthony Blum, president of 
the Laurentian Gold Mining Co., and were 'said by him to have 
been taken froni the company's mine near Lake Manitou. 

The Canadian Clay Workers Association, which was organ- 
ized a year ago, held its first annual meeting at Hamilton on 
December 13t.h; when the name of the society was changed 
to th(! Ontario Clay Product- Manufacturers' Association. The 
president was requested to interview the Minister of Lands 
and Mines to urge the establishment of a technical school at 
the Agricultural College, Guelph, to teach clay working. The 
following were elected officers for the ensuing year-— Messrs 
S. J. Fox, M.P.P., Lindsay, president.; J. B. Milk-r, Toronto and 
Wni. Hancock, Hamilton, vice-presidents; C. S. Bcchtel, Water- 
loo, secretary-treasurer. Among others who addressed the 
convention was Prof. Baker, of the School of Mines, Kingston. 



The name of The Ontario-.Minnesota Mining Company 
Limited, has been changed to The Ontario-Dululh Mining Com- 
pany, Limited. 

Mr. W. G.Tretheway.the owner of one of the richest mines 
at (x)halt, announces that he has arraiig(!d (o erect a smelter 
near that town lor the treatinenf of th(! onss of the district. 

The Manitoba Peat Company of Winnipeg, Limited, and 
the J. B. and J. C. Mining, Development and Smelting Co 
extra-provmcial companies, have been licensed to do business 
in Ontario. 

The Ontario Government has cancelled a large number 
of mining leases for default of pavment of rent. The leases 
cover properties in the townships of Drurv, Coffin Trill Mc- 
Mahon, May, (iilmor, Nairn, Moncrieff, Hyman, Lorne, Salter 
Galbraith, Shedden, Craig, Merritt and Haughton in Algoma 
district; Dryden, Falconl)ridge, Calvin, Awrey, Hagar, Scad- 
ding, Chisholm, Davis and a number of locations near Lake 
Wahnapitae in Nipissing district; Blake, Gillies, Strange 
Donon, and Papoonge in Thunder Bay district; Jaffray, Hay- 
cock, Van Home, and a number of locations near Rat Portage 
On Lake of the Woods and Lake Manitou in the district of Rainy 
River north. These leases were nearly all granted in the early 
nineties, for ten years. The amounts in arrears are small in 
most cases under one hundred dollars. Of course many of them 
are worthless for mineral or the holders would not forfeit them 
for such small amounts. There are a large number more to 
be cancelled, it is stated about two thousand in all. 

MINING IN THE KOOTENAYS IN 1904. 

(From Oun Own Correspondknt.) 

The twelve months just passed has been a record year for 
the inimng districts of British Columbia. From the camps 
of the Boundary country, Ro.ssland, Slocan, Lardeau and East 
Kootenay there has been exported a total tonnage of over 1 ,300 - 
000 tons of ore. Boundary's output has largely increased 
Rossland has held its own, while the Slocan and East Kootenay 
have nearly approached the output of the banner year (1900) 
of lead-silver production in British Columbia. The increase 
has been due to a variety of causes chief among which, however 
may be placed the increased value of the metals, the bounty on 
lead, the lessening rate of smelter charges, both in respect to 
copper and lead. 

Three-fourths of the total tonnage is derived from the 
Boundary countiy and the greater part of that tonnage is due 
to the enormous output of the Granby mines. It is true that 
the ores are chiefly low grade, the proportion of high grade 
ores being even lower this year than last, although the opposite 
expectation was formed. But the low grade mines are those 
with the greater permanency and moreover afford steady em- 
ployment to hundreds of men, not alone in the mining of the ore 
but also in the smelting, refining and transportation industries. 
As in the Boundary the smelters treating the ores of those 
camps are situated in the district itself, it follows that the money 
expended in mining, transportation and smelting largely re- 
mains in the country and helps to upbuild the district. The 
number of shipping mines in the Boundary has not largely in- 
creased during 1905 but much extra prospecting has been 
accomplished whose fruits will be apparent in 1906. It is for 
this reason that all the smelters are increasing or are about to 
increase their furnace capacity. The Granby is now operating 
eight furnaces; the British Columbia Copper smelter at Green- 
wood, with two furnaces is doubling this number and the Domin- 
ion Copper smelter at Boundary Falls is about to increase its 
plant in a similar manner. 

North and south of the Boundary district, mines situated 
along the Kettle river and others found westward in the Okana- 
gan and Smnlkameen are awaiting transportation, which seems 
likely to be forthcoming immediately, to become productive. 

Nor are the pro.spects of the mines at Rossland one whit 
less bright, although the district has not been without its troubles. 
For example the recent concentration experiments have been no 
more successful than those previously attempted. In December 
1904, it was declared that the costly experiment made bv the 
former management of the War Eagle and Centre Star mines 
had tailed. Apparently this was caused by the manager going 
directly contrary to the expert ad^'ice recei\-ed. This year the 
Le Roi has followed suit. It erected an experimental plant on 
it^ ground, occupying about the only level spot on the whole 
of the property, going, necessarily, into the further expense of 
hoisting its ores. There was no expert in this particular case, 
the man employed being a "practical man" but the result 
was the same. The only real success in this direction was ac- 
complished on the Velvet Portland on a 30 ton scale, but being 
modest has not attracted the attention it merited. The success 
in this case seems to have been due to the use of hydraulic clas- 
sifiers, the same idea being successfuUv carried out on a much 
larger scale in the Roseberry j^lant on Slocan lake. However 
with a smelter rate of $3 a ton, concentration is not the pressing 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



33 



necessity it was when the rate was $8. The gain in the price of 
copper, 'if permanent, should make the difference, especially 
with the new treatment rate, between profitable and unprofit- 
able ore, hi many a mine around the Rossland camp. 

As has been already stated the silver lead production has 
been exceptionally great, the most important producing proper- 
ty being the St. Eugene, but during the year a smelter has been 
started at Man,'sviile and is treating a large output from the 
Sullivan mine. ' At other properties such as the Ranbler Cari- 
boo, the Payne, Slocan Star, Lucky Jim, Monitor, Ajax, Bosun, 
Bluebell, Higland, Silver Cup, Triune and other extensive devel- 
opment operations have been in progress, while some have also 
been productive. Production was maintained during the year 
by over 100 mines, of more or less importance. The price of 
lead has been one of the causes of the increase but yet another 
has been the increased facilities provided by the smelters. The 
new roasting process, known by half a dozen names, for the 
desulphurization of the ores, was installed at the Marysville 
plant under the name of the Huntington-Heberlein and similar 
roasters are in course of erection at Trail and at Nelson, cheap- 
ening considerably the cost of reduction. One factor of impor- 
tance in the improvement that has taken place is the establish- 
ment of the Orient as a market for our lead and silver by the 
C.P.R. Yet another factor is the process, now struggling into 
perfection, of separating the zinc from the lead. As long as 
zinc was penalized heavily in the smelters, lead ore which car- 
ried much zinc, and such is the case with a large percentage 
of Kootenay silver lead properties was handicapped. Now 
with the establishment of the Monitor Ajax Company's zinc 
works at Roseberry and of the plant at Kaslo, this disability 
is being removed simultaneously with a rising market in lead 
and the zinc itself. When zinc was an ingredient to be 
dreaded in and lead ore, when spelter ruled around $90 a ton, 
little indeed was thought about the zinc properties abounding in 
the hills of the Kootenay. To-day things are far different. 
Spelter has risen to 1140 the ton. A mill has been erected at 
Roseberrj' which will separate the zinc from the lead. Other 
will follow. There was a further problem to be attacked and 
that was the further separation of the iron from the zinc, iron 
being penalized in a zinc concentrate just as zinc is penalized 
in a lead ore. Magnetic separation, first started upon the Payne 
mine, has solved this problem to a great extent, although the 
last word is far from having been said. A zinc separator is in 
progress at Kaslo and another is about to be erected by the 
Monitor Ajax Company, while zinc and iron magnetic separators 
are in course of construction at Pilot Bay. The latter enter- 
prise is a part of the plans of the Canadian Metals Company 
which has already partially erected a zinc smelter at Frank. 
The scheme is to" get ore from the lead and zinc mines on or 
near Kootenay lake, bring them down to Pilot Bay, there separ- 
ate the lead from the zinc and the iron from the latter concen- 
trates and then ship this zinc, greatly reduced in bulk from the 
original ore to the Frank smelter. It is hoped that the whole 
project will take definite form some time during the coming year, 
much to the lasting benefit of the whole country. 

In addition to the districts thus glanced at mention should 
be made of the Windermere camp where a number of mines 
such as the Red Line, Paradise, Delphine and others await the 
construction of the Kootenay Central railroad to begin develop- 
ment and shipping on a large scale. 

A further point is that a number of low grade free milling 
properties seem to be likely to be profitably operated in the 
fixture through an adaptation of the cyanide process by Dr. 
Hendryx, which method has lately been successfully applied 
at the Reliance mine near Nelson. 



COMPANY MEETINGS AND REPORTS. 

Consolidated Cariboo Hydraulic. — In his report to the 
Directors, Mr. J. B. Hobson states as follows: — 

" Owing to lack of ample precipitation the past season turned 
out the most disappointing one experienced since the equipment 
and opening of the property. The total quantity of water 
afforded amounted to only 45,071 5-10 inches, which was suffi- 
cient to warrant the opening of the mine for regular mining 
operations. 

"The small quantity of water available was, however, 
used to face up the bank so as to afford Mr. Charles Hoffman, 
the expert for Mr. John Hays Hammond, an opportunity to 
test the gold values of the deposits of the upper bench from the 
floor of the excavation to the surface. 

"When the canals were opened and sufficient water accum- 
ulated in the pooling reservoirs the water was used at intervals 
of a few hours each to clear the cuts and sluices of the ice that 
accumulated therein during the winter months. This work 
commenced on the 20th day of April, and was completed on 
the 11th day of May. During the progress of the work, includ- 
ing 74 hours' washing, 8,275 miners' inches of water were used. 

"Washing to remove the talus and to face up the bank 



commenced on the 12th day of May and continued for a period 
of 354 hours, equal to 14 days and 18 hours' washing. During 
the progress of the work 36,796.85 miners' inches of water were 
used to wash out volcanic nuid capping from which was recover- 
ed 1,268.7 ounces of gold, valued at $21,733.47^an average 
yield of 11.81 cents per cubic yard. The duty attained for the 
"water used was about five cubic yards per miners' inch per 24 
hours." 

The following is a summarj^ of the season's prospecting: — 

Total time occupied in washing top gravel, 354 hours, or 
14 days 18 hours; total quantity of water used washing gravel, 
36,796.85 miners' inches; total quantity of top deposits washed, 
183,984 cubic yards; average duty of water per miners' inch, 
washing gravel, 5 cubic yards; average yield per cubic yard 
washed^ 11.81 cents; average yield per 2,500 miners' inches of 
water used, 24 hours, $1,268.7 ounces; value of gold recovered 
since 1894, $1,212, 03.04; total value of gold recovered from 
June 1, 1894, to June 22, 1905, $1,233,936.51. 

"The precipitation for the season commencing at close of 
mining operations on September 4, 1904, and ending June 22, 
1905, turned out the lowest recorded for the district since the 
phenomenally diy seasons of 1864 and 1887. Precipitation for 
season, 1904^ 24.39 inches; precipitation for season, 1905 (rain- 
fall 7.04 inches, for snowfall 6.75 inches), total for season, 13.79 
inches; season, 1905, precipitation less than that of 1904 by 
10.60 inches; quantity of water available and used during season 
1905, 45,053 miners' inches; season of 1905, water supply less 
than that of season of 1904 by 180.146 miners' inches. 

"The rain precipitation occurred in such light showers 
that only on three occasions, namely, October 20, 1904, . 60 
inch; May 11, 1904, 68 inch; and May 20, 1905, .75 inch, did 
it prove sufficient to contribute any water to the reservoir lakes. 

"The snowfall, which averaged 67.05 inches on the water- 
shed tributary to the reservoir lakes, went too slowly under the 
influence of moderately warm days accompanied by northerly 
winds and temperatures falling under freezing point at night — 
bad weather conditions for a water supply and accounting for 
the unusually small percentage of the snow precipitation that 
was contributed to the reservoir lakes." 

"Careful gaugings of the water supply flowing from Spanish 
lake from November 15, 1904, to date, indicate that the water- 
shed tributary to that lake is capable, even .with the light pre- 
cipitation recorded for the past season, of affording ample water 
to keep the mine in continuous operation throughout the open 
season, and the company's water system should be extended 
with all possible haste to that source of abundant and perman- 
ent water supply. 

"The 10 ft. X 10 ft. sluice tunnel was advanced 679 feet at 
a cost of $16 .34 per foot, making a total length to face 930 feet, 
and leaving 300 feet of tunnel and 60 feet of upraise to complete 
the new opening into the hydraulic excavation, the floor of 
which is now about 75 feet alDove the bedrock of the channel. 
During the months of May and June, several dikes of extremely 
hard rock were encountered, which interfered with the progress 
of the work and added materially to the cost thereof. The tunnel 
and upraise should be completed without delay so as to facili- 
tate the working of the high grade deposits included in the lower 
bench and on the bedrock and the cutting out of about 4,000 
feet of sluice, which is very expensive to maintain. 

"The large amount of necessaiy repairs and development 
work done during the progress of the past two season's work 
leaves the water supply system and the mine in as good condition 
as possible for the continuous use of an abundant water supply; 
hut the mine will not be in first class condition until the sluice 
tunnel is opened and the bank can be worked in one bench from 
surface to bedrock. 

"The upper gravels washed during the season showed a 
marked increase in grade indicating that the low grade zone 
encountered in the current-crossing has been passed. 

"A bank blast of about 6,000 kegs of black powder, to cost 
about $27,000, is strongly recommended. Such a blast would 
disintegrate and break up ready for economical washing the 
heavy capping of indurated volcanic mud at a cost not exceeding 
one cent per cubic yard, as against a cost of about 12 cents per 
cubic yard to break it up with dynamite and hard labor. The 
proper disintegration of indurated alluvial deposits tends to 
increase the washing duty of the water, thereby increasing the 
gold output, besides working a material reduction in the cost of 
mining." 

The total run last season was only 14 days 18 hours, cut- 
ting down the production to 1,268, 4/10 ounces, or $21,733.47. 

Le Roi Mining Company. — The Directors submitted the 
following report at the meeting held on December 8th: — 

The accounts show a balance in favor of profit and loss of 
£49,741. This result is arrived at after paying to the bank 
£4254 on account of interest and advances, and after writing off 
£21,345 for exploration and development and £14,139 for de- 
preciation of machinery and plant, surface improvements, etc., 
at the mine and smelter. In the year there were fortunately 



34 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



extra prohts (1) of about. £10,000 owing to the receipt of a better 
price ior matte at Tacoma under the contract arranged bv Mr 
Wilson and approved by Mr. Mackenzie; (2) of about £7000 
%nnn^''''- ^^"^ increased price of copper, and (.3) of about 
£2000 owing to the decreased price of .coke. The ore mined 
was ot higher vahie than in the previous year by ,|1.47 per ton 
or, .say, £.34,843 on the tonnage mined during the vear, and was 
produced more especially from the 700 ,800 and 900 foot levels. 
. L'^f^""','*'*, ''^?-"' ^'^'^ liabilities at June 30 amounted 

to £54,394 and the liquid assets amounted to £12.5 483 This 
IS an improvement in surplus liquid assets upon the previous 
year ot £56,886, and is largely owing to the advantage of sendin"- 
inatte to Tacoma under the contract, which made the proceeds 
immediately available, instead of waiting several months as 
heretofore, when shipped to New York. " ' 

The board regrets to have to state that the important body 
ot tngh grade ore referred to in the previous report as having 
been discovered m the 14.50 level, averaging $30 per ton in value 
and nine feet in width, has out been productive of the results 
that were then expected, only 3011 tons having been extracted 
below the 13.50 foot level from November, 1904 to June 1905 
and 1422 tons during the following three months. The gross 

fn^ J ^^^^ '"'^'^^ °f t'^^ two above amounts, was 

«88,407, and the total expenses were $72,249, leaving a net pro- 
ht ot $16,158. The proportion of richer ore thus obtained, 
though raising the general value of the ore mined, bears very 
little upon the profits, inasmuch as the total amount of ore re- 
ported to have been raised during the fiscal year was 1 14 960 
dry tons. ' 

The small experimental plant for treating the value of 
water concentration ordered by the board, and referred to in 
the previous report as in process of erection by the company 
under Mr. McMillan at Rossland, commenced running on July 
1 and has not, unfortunately, answered the expectations which 
were entertained in regard to it. Instead of $13,000 which it 
was expected to cost, $33,049 has been laid out upon it Mr 
Mackenzie was obliged to shut it down as it was not adapted 
tor the work required. 

During the whole of the year the ores from the mine were 
sent by Mr. McMillan to the Northport smelter in place of the 
1 rail smelter as advised by IMessrs. Bradley and Mackenzie 
with a direct loss m one year, on the statement of the company's 
accountant at Rossland, through continuing to use the smelter, 
of $109,57.5 It was in these circumstances, and upon the 
authority that the directors entered into a contract with the 
Canadian Smelting Works. 

The ore reserves are unfortunately low. They were esti- 
mated by Professor Brock, of the Dominion Government Geo- 
logical Department, in January, to be 124,000 tons, but Mr. 
Astley reports that the deposits are very irregular and "spottv " 
and at the close of the year Mr. Astley " found it impossible' to 
accurately estimate them." Mr. Astley and his foreman Mr. 
Trevarrow, reported to Mr. Mackenzie on Sept. 1 that the ore 
reserves did not exceed at that date 39,000 tons, containing gross 
values of $10.68 per ton. Mr. Mackenzie states that the ore 
reserves in the Le Roi have never been so low as at present, and 
an immense amount of development work will be necessary 
during the coming year. 

In the last report the directors referred to the question of 
consolidation of interests with other companies and to the com- 
mencement of negotiations for that purpose, which were naturally 
expected to occupy a considerable period of time. The com- 
panies proposed to be amalgamated with the Le Roi Minin^ 
Company are: The St. Eugene Consolidated Mining Co., Limited" 
the Centre Star Mmmg Co. Limited, including the War Eagle 
properties; the Canadian Smelting Works at Trail includino- 
the Rossland Power Company. ' 

Mr. Mackenzie's report contains not only his opinion that 
the proposed amalgamation is desirable in the interests of the 
Le Roi Company, but also his recommendations as to the pro- 
P°'"t"?."? w^'^'h he considers to be fair and reasonable between 
the ditterent companies to be amalgamated. Mr. Mackenzie 
concludes his report as follows: "I would recommend the Le 
Roi Conipany to enter the consolidation on the terms previously 
stated, ftrmly believing that there is no question of doubt as 
to the results being beneficial to the shareholders." It will be 
easily be understood that the progress of these negotiations has 
torined a matter ot constant consideration not unmixed with 
anxiety to the board. They have all along felt that the results 
in the working of the Le Roi mine from time to time were pre- 
carious, and that the expectations occasionally held out to them 
were far from being realized. They have thus been forced to 
the conclusion that it would undoubtedly be to the interests 
of the Le Roi shareholders to participate on equitable terms in 
the workmg of a strong and f)rosperous company as was gener- 
ally approved at the last meeting. 

The di rectors therefore strongly advise the shareholders to 
adopt Uie reconnnendatioiis of Mr. Mackenzie, which tliey them- 
selv(!s believer will, if carried out, result in the earning of' regular 
dividends in the futu'-e. In the report of Mr. Mackenzie the 



proposal, so ar as the Le Roi shareholders are concerned, is 
that they sliiill receive m exchange for their shares 24 per cent 
m the capital of the new company to be formed, and, without 
including the value of cash and stores, he estimates that a divi- 
dend of no less than 19 per cent, per annum will be earned bv 

«Tn nno ^'""^Panifs On a capital of $4,000,000, e.mal to, 
say, JjpouU;Uu(). 

If however, the proposed amalgamation is carried out 
according to the present intentions, the 'capital of the combined 
company will be £1,200,000, of which £1,100,000, representing 
the amount referred to by Mr. Mackenzie in addition to values 
ot cash and st^ores of the various companies, will be divided pro- 
portionately between the various companies and £100 000 will 
remain miissued, and will be available for taking further proper- 
ties into the amalgamation or for other purposes. The Le Roi 
Company would be allotted as its slrnre, 24 per cent of this 
capital, amounting to £264.000, on which regular dividends of 
14 per cent, or say £37,000 a year, might be expected and this 
m a new company not overburdened as the Le Roi Company 
has hitherto been, with an exce.ssive capital. A sum would 
It '« expected, be realized bv the Le Roi Company in cleaning 
up the Northport smc'lter and for cash and stores of, sav £60 000 
Out of this £30,000 will be paid as a cash working capital to 
the new company, and the balance of, say £.30,000 will be avail- 
able for distribution amongst the Le Roi shareholders. In addi- 
tion to the Le Roi contribution of £30,000 the other companies 
LTnnn contribute their proportions, which will amount 
to £9.5,0()0 and the new company will thus start with a working 
capital of £125,000, which it is considered will be sufficient to 
carry on its operations in the best possible way 

Mr. Aldridge who will be responsible for the management 
of the new company, and who is intimately acquainted with 
the various properties, reports that in the past year the St 
Eugene Company earned a net profit of .$575,827, and had in its 
treasury in cash $372,000; the Centre Star Company which 
since negotiations have started has absorbed the properties 
ot the War Eagle Company, earned a net profit of $144 846 
and had in its treasury and in cash due, .$217 254- and' the 
Canadian Smelting Works earned a net profit of $188 8.50 and 
had an earned reserve of $223,496. So the above Canadian 
companies had altogether a net profit of $909,523 in the vear 
and a surplus of cash on hand of .$812,938. 

The great advantages to be derived from this amalgamation 
are tu ly set torth under the following six headings in Sir Mac- 
kenzie s report: (1) A reduction in the cost of mining and ex- 
ploration; (2) a substantial saving in administrative and office 
expenses; (3) reduction in freight and treatment charges -(4) 
reduction in present cost of marketing copper; (5) competent 
management and skillful direction of exploration work under 
one head; (6) the prestige and advantages of a large and power- 
ul corporation with sufficient capital to assure the future 
backed by the support of a great transcontinental railway vitally 
mterested m the upbuilding of a profitable mining and smelting 
industry m British Columbia. ^ 
At the meeting the resolution adopting the report and 
accounts was carried unanimously, but when a second resolu- 
tion was put to the meeting to agree to the scheme of amalga- 
mation. It was lost by a large majority. 

The Chairman thereupon demanded a poll, which he said 
would be taken by voting papers being sent to the shareholders 
who would be asked to return them within a fortnight 

The motion to re-elect Mr. Waterlow, a director, was also " 
negatived, and resolutions re-appointing Mr. MacMillan and the 
three gentlemen mentioned by him as directors, were carried 
the Chairman demanding a poll in each case. ' 



MINING NOTES. 



ALBERTA. 

• Oil has been struck in one of the weUs of the Western Oil 

w T aTP x"^' ^""'^^"^^ ^ l^^'ge tract of land in South 

Western Alberta. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
Boundary.— It is announced that the British Columbia 
Copper Company ns about to make a further large expenditure 
increasing the capacity of its Greenwood smelter to .300 tons 
daily, and contracts have recently been let to the Power & 
Mining Machinery Company for the building of three blast 
turna^es 84 x 240 inches, having a combined capacity of 1,800 
tons daily. These changes will also necessitate the eiilargenient 
of tile ore^ bins, and a machine shop will also be added The 
contract for additional electrical equipment has been' placed 
w-ith the Canadian Westmghouse Company and consists of a 
500 horse power motor to Ativg the compressor plant at the 
Mother Lode mine and three 50 kw. stepdown transformers 

for the smelter department have been ordered three 300 
horse power motors to drive the large new blowers, an additional 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



35 



100 kw. motor generator, besides several smaller motors. In 
addition there are five trolley locomotives for hauling ore from 
the bins to the blast furnaces and the slag to the waste dump. 

With the completion early in the spring of the new service 
into the Boundary district of the West Kootenay Power & Light 
Company, additional electric power of 60,000 volts will be utilized 
at the smelter and mine. 

Si.ocAN. — The case of the Lanyon Zinc Company i's. the 
Payne Mining Company was recently settled out of court, each 
side agreeing to pay its own costs. 

RossL.\ND. — A contract has been let for carrying the winze 
from the 1,550 ft. level at the Le Roi, dowm to the 1,750 ft. 
level. It is proposed, should this ground prove as rich as ex- 
pected, to deepen the main shaft from the 1,350 ft. level. 

On December 17th a tremendous explosion of powder 
occurred at the Centre Star mine, killing Mr. J. Ingraham, 
formerly Chief of Police of Ro.s.sland, and causing considerable 
damage to the mine buildings in the vicinity. 
Add British Columbia Mining notes 

LiLLOOET. — The Iowa & Lillooet Gold Mining Company's 
dredge, which has been in operation during the past season on 
the Fraser River, below the town, is said to have made a very 
satisfactory' showing, the average daily recovery having been 
in the neighbourhood of .SIOO.OO. During the year placer 
mining was carried on at Cayoosh Creek, Alexander Creek, the 
north fork of Bridge River and on the south fork of Bridge River, 
and Cadwallader Creek. The Lorne mine was also worked, 
good values being recovered from the ore which was crushed 
in an arrastra. 

E.\ST Kootenay. — A 2 per cent, dividend was paid to 
shareholders of the St. Eugene Company on January 8th. The 
earnings of the mine during 1905 were over $500,000.00, of which 
sum $28,000.00 was distributed as dividends in quarterly amounts 
at the rate of 2 per cent. 

Nelson. — It is reported that a number of iron claims on 
Crawford Creek have been sold to a syndicate of Cleveland and 
St. Paul purchasers. 

Atlin. — Referring to reports in the Victoria Press that 
the day of the individual miner in Atlin is practically over, the 
Atlin Claim emphatically denies the statement. Our contem- 
porary states as follows: — These views are simply a re-hash 
of the stuff with which the coast papers are deluged every fall 
by company managers, company promoters and their hangers- 
on. These gentlemen have the stage all to themselves as the 
individual miner stays at home and works to keep up the annual 
gold output. If the Minister of Mines report of the outpvit 
was dependent on the results achieved by the majority of the 
companies, Atlin would cut a very sorry figure. The indivi- 
duals, proportionately, are taking out the most gold and the 
interviews that emanate from company promoters claiming that 
the day of the individual miner is over are ridiculous. The wish 
is father to the thought. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

During the month of December the Dominion Iron & Steel 
Company made a very remarkable showing. The blast fur- 
naces produced nearly 21,000 tons of pig iron; the open hearths, 
which at the beginning of the year were producing about 10,000 
tons of steel, last month, turned out over 20,000 tons. The rail 
mill whose previous best record was less than 8,000 tons, made 
last month 10,000 tons. The output of the rod mill was 6,700 
tons of wire, notwithstanding the fact that it was idle for two 
shifts, thus beating the Sharon mill record of 6,200 tons. In 
this regard, a 25,000 ton order from the CJrand Trunk Railway 
Co., one of 5,000 tons from the Temiskaming Railway of Ontario, 
and one of 25,000 tons for the Intercolonial Railway of Canada 
have been completed. An additional order of 37,000 tons from 
the Grand Trunk, besides a heavy order from the Canadian 
Pacific, have been accepted for the new Year. With a view to 
to the largest winter's output of iron and steel in the history of 
the plant, the company during the year made the greatest im- 
portations of iron ore and limestone on record, the quantity of 
the former material brought from iron ore mines at Wabona 
alone amounting to over 400,000 tons, against a little more than 
half that amount in former years. At present the company 
have three thousand men on the payroll of the Sydney plant 
and this is the largest number of hands employed since manu- 
facturing operations were commenced. 

ONTARIO. 

Mr. E. T. Corkill, who recently visited the Algoma district, 
reports that a new concentrating mill, with a capacity of about 
60 tons per 24 hours, has been installed at the Superior Copper 
Mine. The plant includes a three-compartment hydraulic 
separator and four No. 4 Wilfley tables. It is stated that the 
Elmore oil plant at the Massey Station copper mine has treated 



about 3,500 tons of ore during the past year, and has succeeded 
in recovering copper values to the extent of frgrn 75 to 80 per 
cent. 

The Lake Superior Company recently contracted to supply 
the C.P.R. with 60,000 tons to steel rails, to be delivered this 
year. 

At the session of the Tariff Commission, held at Sault Ste. 
Marie on December 21st, the Lake Superior Corporation asked 
that a duty on coal for coking purposes, amounting to 53 cents 
per ton, be removed. It is urged that if this tax be removed, 
large coke works will be established on the Canadian side of 
the line. The company's steel plant uses 500 tons of coke per 
day. 

Two big gushers are reported to have been struck in the 
Leamington Oil Fields on December 9th, one on the property of 
the Leamington Oil Company, which flowed ten barrels an hour, 
and the other on Concession 7, which has been flowing about 3,000 
bbls. per day. 

Mining operations are to be carried on extensively at the 
Aitakan iron mines this winter, and arrangements are now being 
made to install the necessary machinery on the properties. 
Operations will be carried on vmder the direction of Mr. J. C. 
Hunter. 

A very rich strike of ore is reported to have been made at 
the Laurentian mine, which was recently re-opened, a blast at 
the 85 ft. level disclosing a great mass of visible gold in the quartz. 

During the month of November the Big Master mine pro- 
duced gold to the value of $3,000, as a result of 30 days crushing. 
The concentrates were estimated to be worth $800. 

In the Cobalt district several claims have recently been sold 
for good prices. Thus a claim on Cross Lake was sold to the 
Imperial Mining Company for $60,000; the McLeod and Glen- 
denning mines were sold for, it is reported, $250,000, and two 
or three other properties have been purchased at equally high 
prices. 

Mr. Smith, Inspector for the Temiskaming Mining Division, 
states that since April 5th, he has issued 1,000 licenses for the 
division. There is every indication that next spring the rush 
to the mining fields of the division will be greater than at any 
time this year. 

YUKON. 

The Mining Committee of the Yukon Council is now engaged 
in drawing up a code of mining laws, which will be acceptable 
to those operating in the territory. Several meetings have been 
held of late, and there has been a singiilar unanimity of view 
as to the main points requiring amendment in the present milling 
law. It is the intention of the Committee to submit its recom- 
mendations to Ottawa, when it will be brought down in the 
form of a bill, to be presented at the next session of the House 



MINING MEN AND AFFAIRS. 

On Nov. 28th, Mr. J. F. Halloran transferred his entire 
interest in the Mining and Scientific Press to Mr. T. A. Rickard, 
lately editor and part owner of the Engineering and Mining 
Journal, New York. It is the intention to maintain the high 
character of the paper and to keep it in its position as the re- 
presentative mining journal of the Great W est. Mr. Edgar 
Rickard, of Berleley, is already business manager. Mr. T. A. Ric- 
kard will assume active editorship on the first day of 1906. Mr. 
Arthur H. Halloran, son of the former proprietor, will be one 
of his assistants. Several of the leading writers in the profession 
have undertaken to contribute practical articles bearing upon 
mining and metallurgy. As both the editor and the business 
manager are mining engineers by training and familiar with 
the chief mining regions of the world, it is expected that the 
Mining and Scientific Press will gain in interest to its readers 
and in usefulness to its advertisers. 

The secretary of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers 
has addressed the following circular to members: — 

"On the invitation of members residing in Toronto, and by 
resolution of the Council, the annual meeting of this Society will 
be held in Toronto, during the fourth week in January. It is 
expected that special railway facilities will be available for mem- 
bers attending the meeting. A detailed programme will be 
forwarded to you early in January." 

Mr. Alex. Dick, General Sales Agent of the Dominion Coal 
Company, recently returned from an extensive tour of the 
American and Canadian coal fields. Mr. Dick states that the 
coal trade is in a very flourishing condition, the Dominion Coal 
Company's output last year having been a record achievement. 

Mr. R. H. Anderson has been appointed mine manager at 
the Sullivan mines. East Kootenay, B.C; 

Mr. J. H. Plummer, President of the Dominion Iron & Steel 
Co., recently left for a brief sojourn abroad. Prior to his depart- 
ure Mr. Plummer stated that the company is now maintaining 
an output at the rate of 20,000 tons of pig iron per month, all 



36 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



of which is heiiip; converted into steel. This tonnage, how(!ver, 
is certainly gaining and 1 believe it will reach 2r>,0()() tons by 
spring. The prices, while fair at Sydney are not- high wheii 
compared with those in the States. From the larg(! orders on 
hand and being received there is no doubt about the rail mill 
l)eing fully occupied. The heavy demand is no doubt caused 
by the open hearth rails proving to be of a superior quality. 

Mr. Geo. A. Walkem, who for over four years past has acted 
as manager of the Vancouver Engineering Works, has resigned 
his post. Before leaving Mr. Walkem was presented with a 
handsome testimonial by the employees of the company. 

Mr. W. French, Mechanical Superintendent of the Hall 
Mines smelter at Nelson, B.C., was presented by the employees 
on Christmas Day, with a gold watch and chain, in token of 
their regard and esteem. 



COMPANY NOTES. 

Tilt Cove Copper. — The .secretary has issued the following 
circular to shareholders, dated November, 3()th: — I beg to 
inform you that at a meeting of the members of the Committee 
of Management of this company, held to-day, it was resolved — 
"That an interim dividend of 3s. per share be and is hereby 
declared on the shares of this company, free of income tax, pay- 
able on the .5th day of December, 190.5, to the shareholders on the 
books of the company on the 4th of December, 19(35, and that 
the transfer books be closed during the said 4th day of December, 
1905. Holders of share warrants to bearer are informed that 
coupons No. 7 will be paid at the above rate, free of income tax, 
on presentation at the company's office. In sending yo>i this 
notice of interim dividend the committee desire to point out 
that this dividend is based on the profits for eight months, 
namely, from 31st December, 1904, to 31st August, 1905, which 
includes the realization of the large stock of ore brought forward 
from 31st December, 1904." 

Le Roi. — "November shipments amount to 8,000 tons, 
containing 2,550 ounces of gold, 4,350 ounces of silver, 187,600 
lbs. of copper. Estimated profit on this ore, after deducting 
cost of mining, smelting, realization and depreciation, $17,000. 
Expenditure on development work during the month, $9,000." 

New Velvet Portland Mine, Limited. — Registered No- 
vember 18, by C. W. Brown & Aylen, 2 Gresham Buildings, 
E.C. Capital £10,000, in £1 shares. Objects:— To acquire, 
prospect, examine, explore, and worlc any property or ground 
supposed to contain gold or minerals in Canada or elsewhere, 
in particular to take over the undertaking and all or any of 
the assets in British Columbia of the Velvet Portland Mine, 
Limited; to adopt an agreement with W. Trotter and C. W. 
Brown; and to carry on the business of gold and general miners, 
metallurgists, &c. Minimum cash subscription, 10 per cent, 
of the shares offered to the public. The first directors (to 
number not less than two nor more than five) are: E. H. Clarke, 
A. Maclean, and W. J. Newhall. Qualifications of subsequent 
directors, one share. 

Tyee Copper (Vancouver Island). — November: Smelter 
ran 11 days, and smelted — Tyee ore, 2,304 tons; Customs ore, 
265 tons; total, 2,569 tons. Matte produced from same, 22() 
tons. Gross value of contents (copper, silver, and gold) after 
deducting costs of refining and purchase of Customs ore, $31,062. 

Dominion Copper Company, Ltd. — The following circular 
has been issued to shareholders: — Pursuant to the plan of re- 
organization under which the Montreal & Boston Consolidated 
Mining & Smelting Company, Limited, (hereinafter called the 
Consolidated Company) conveyed its properties to your com- 
pany the new board of directors was elected on July 28, 1905, 
and thereupon assumed the management of your company. 

The contemplated issue of bonds, amounting to $700,000, 
was at once consummated. Out of the funds received from all 
sources, including the bond issue, your company has paid (1) 
the balance amounting to $339,158.79 due under the so-called 
"Dominion" agreement for the purchase of stock of your com- 
pany; (2) a large amount of debts of the consolidated" company, 
which were specifically as.sumed by your company; (.3) the char- 
ges incident to the reorganization and the expenses of general 
administration; and (4) about $.50,000 for equipment, supplies, 
labor and other outlays in developing the mines of the company, 
antl preparing to start the smelter. 

The company now has balances in bank aggregating about 
$115,000; and has mining and smelting supplies worth about 
$.30,000, 

Tin; assets a(;<juir(!d by your company comprised among 
other properties, a large majorit y of t he capit al stock of the Mon- 
treal & Jio.ston Copper Company, Limited, which owns the 
smelter. After the present management assumed charge of 



your company in .luly last, Messrs. Munroe & Munroe ass<;rted 
against the Montreal & Boston (;f)pf)er ( 'ompany a claim, an)oiint- 
ing to about $17,000, for alleged services and' advances to that 
company. The dnhn is being vigorously defended. The Crow's 
Nest Pass Coal Company also asserted a claim against t he .Mon- 
treal & Boston Copper Company amounting to about .S20,000 
for coke alleged to have been furnished to that company about 
two years ago. In addition, there have been asserted against 
that company claims amounting to about $7,000 for legal ser- 
vices alleged to have been performed by Canadian and New 
York lawyers, and other claims aggregating over a thou.sand 
dollars. A Canadian firm of lawyers al.so demands $3,008.70 
for alleged services to the Consolidated Company. 

The assertion of these claims came as a surprise to the 
present management. Careful investigations regarding them 
were at once instituted. While claims against the Montreal 
& Bo,ston Copper Company are not liabilities of your company, 
it is claimed, they are so far as valid enforceable against the 
smelting property, and may have to be taken care of in some 
way. 

Your company appointed Mr. Samuel Newhouse as general 
manager of the mining operations of the company and employed 
Mr. M. M. Johnson as consulting engineer. The work of devel- 
oping the mining properties of the company has been actively 
taken up. The .smelter of the Montreal & Boston Copper Com- 
pany not having been properly cared for was found to be in an 
unsatisfactory condition, and required exten.sive repairs. It is 
not properly located or equipped to treat the ores economically 
for any great length of time. Preparations have been made, 
however, to start it. About .50 men are now employed at the 
mines and smelter, and when the smelter is in operation about 
200 men will be employed. 

It is the intention of the management, acting under the ad- 
vice of the general manager and consulting engineer, to ascer- 
tain as nearly as possible the character and volume of the ores 
in the various mines, and thereupon to determine to most ex- 
pedient methods of handling and treating the ores. In order 
to obtain accurate and reliable conclusions in regard to these 
matters it seems necessary to operate the smelter for some period 
at least. The smelter has been put in repair, and it is expected 
that it will be blown in by the first of December, and will be 
capable of treating from 600 to 700 tons of ore per day. 



MINING STATISTICS. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA: 

J. W. Harrison, in his report of the California Coal market 
for November, states that British Columbia deliveries during 
that month were 36,427 tons. The coal deliveries at San Fran- 
cisco during 1905 are estimated as being fully 30 per cent, below 
the quantity received in 1904. 

The production of the Vancouver Island mines is given as 
follows: — Wellington collieries, 60,893 tons; Western Fuel 
Company, 89,285 tons. The Phoenix Pioneer states thai the 
production of the Boundary district for the year reached the 
large total of 949,140 tons, 'of which the Granby mines contri- 
buted 665,000 tons, the B.C. Copper Co., 178,000 tons; the 
Brooklyn-Stemwinder, 54,000 tons, and the Raw Hide, 27,000 
tons. 

The output of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. for 1905 was 
as follows: — 

Tons. 

Coal Creek Mines 429,382 

Michel mines 311,071 

Carbonado Mines 95 170 

Total 835,623 

The Fernie coke "ovens produced 127,062 tons; the Michel 
oven 127,037 tons, and the Carbonado ovens 7804 tons, making 
a total for the year of 261,933 tons, which at .$4. .50 per ton real- 
ized $1,1 78,698. .50. It takes 100 tons of coal to make 60 tons 
of coke, so that the 261,933 tons of coke produced represents 
436,555 tons of the total coal output leaving 399,008 tons of 
coal, which at $2 per ton brought into the treasury $798,136, 
making a total revenue for the year just closed of $1,976,834.50. 

Total shipments of coal by Western Fuel Company for the 
year 1905 were 169,874.05, divided as follows: January, 16 855.- 
14; February, 16,-530.10; March, 24,519.07; April, 28,510.09; 
May, 21,004.00; June, 3,354.00; July, 1,520.17; August, 1,211.05; 
September, 2,042.10; October, 10,447.00; November, 24,199.14; 
December, 27,260.07. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



37 



Shipments of ore o\-er the Kaslo & Slocaii Railway, from 
eighteen shipping mines for the year, is said to have been 11,580 
tons, valued at $273,700.00, of" which the zinc contents repre- 
sented 42.6 per cent. 

The lead returns from the Hall mines smelter for November 
show over 1,000 tons of lead ore received and nearly 300 tons 
of lead contents, notwithstanding the fact that no ore was re- 
ceived during the month from the St. Eugene mine. The chief 
lead shippers in order were the Alice, Whitewater, Reco, Emily, 
Edith and Highlander. 

The lead returns from the Trail smelter for the month of 
November showed lead contents of ore treated as having been 
rather over 150 tons; 500 tons of lead ore were received. 

The Rossland Miner publishes the following table of ore 
shipments for the year: — 

Tons. 

LeRoi 113,566 

Le Roi (miUing) 3,240 

Centre Star 96,630 

War Eagle 66,909 

Le Roi Two. . 9,472 

Le Roi Two (milled) 10,630 

Jumbo 10,729 

Cascade-Bonanza 150 

White Bear 1,100 

White Bear (miUed) 3,220 

Crown Point 350 

Spitzee 4,809 

Velvet-Portland 1,977 

Gopher 180 

Homestake 30 

Lily May 90 

Inland Empire 30 

Total 323,112 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

The Morning Chronicle estimates the value of the coal out- 
put of the province, for the year 1905, at -SI 1,250,000; coke, 
$650,000; gold, $320,000; iron ore, 180,000; other minerals, 
8620,000; pig iron, $3,500,000; steel, $3,800,000; and steel rails, 
$1,500,000. The coal shipments were the largest on record. 

During the year 1905 the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co. 
produced 560,000 tons of coal, 120,000 tons of coke, 58,000 tons 
of pig iron, and 22,000 tons of steel. These are the largest fi- 
gures in the history of the company. 

The record made by the Dominion Steel Co. the past year 
has been very satisfactory. The total production of pig iron 
was 162,000 tons, of the open hearth steel furnaces 173,500 tons 
and of the rolling mills 47,000 tons. Of eighty-pound steel 
rails, 44,000 tons have been already turned out. The produc- 
tion of coke amounted to 242,150 tons. Over half a million tons 
of coal was consumed by the company in its different operations, 
as well as 380,184 tons of iron ore, 267,237 tons of limestone and 
dolomite and 13,711 tons of gravel and sand. During the height 
of the season 4,000 men were employed by the company, and 
the payroll exceeded $2,000,000. Perhaps the most important 
announcement that the company has to make is that it has 
advanced from being a mere purveyor of raw materials to the 
position of a producer of finished materials. At the beginning 
of the year six open hearth furnaces were in operation. This 
number was gradually increased until the whole ten were in use, 
in September and the remaining months of the year. The com- 
pany's wire rods are considered of fine quality and now have the 
Canadian market captured. 

Returns for the Dominion Coal Company for the month of 
December were as follows: — 



Dom 



nion No. 1 34,899 

No. 2 42,355 

No. 3 14,415 

No. 4 32,687 

No. 5 36,032 

No. 6 3,061 

No. 7 8,644 

No. 8 10,209 

No. 9 15,665 



During the month of November shipments from the respec- 
tive coliieries were as follows: — 

Tons. 

Dominion Coal Co., Ltd 278,856 

Cumberland R'y & Coal Co 40,473 

Acadia Coal Company 22,670 

Intercolonial Coal Co 23,617 

N.S. Steel & Coal Co 59,168 

Inverness R'y & Coal Co 11,593 

ONTARIO. 

The Bureau of Mines reports that the output of the metal- 
liferous mines and works of the province for the nine months 
ending September 30th, are as follows: — Gold, 167,259; silver, 
.$1,300,000; nickel, $2,531,000; copper, $522,746; cobalt, $75,- 
000; iron ore, $157,640; pig iron, $2,207,864; steel, .$2,421,549; 
arsenic, $2,400. The shipments from the mines in the Coleman 
township area amounted to 1,802 tons, the contents of which, 
stated separately, were as follows: — Silver, $1,. 300,000; cobalt, 
$75,000; nickel, $6,100; arsenic, $2,400. Total, $1,.383,500. 
Making allowance for the conversion of pig iron into steel, the 
total value of the metalliferous output for the nine months was 
about $9,000,000. For the whole of 1904 it was $5,061,677, so 
that the rate of production during the present year is more than 
double that of 1904. The present year will be the record one 
for the production of nickel in Ontario. The output for the 
nine months is already in excess of the total yield for 1903, 
which up to the present time showed the largest output. 



MINING INCORPORATIONS. 

ONTARIO. 

Sovereign Cobalt Mining Company, Ltd. — Capital $200,000.- 
00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Provisional 
directors: Messrs. Joseph Marsland Horrocks, William Andrew 
Smiley and Frank Joseph Stanley. 

Canadian Forty-Mile Gold Dredging Company, Ltd. — 
Capital stock $600,000.00, in shares of $100.00 each. Head 
Office, Toronto. 

Ontario Cobalt Developing Company, Ltd. — Capital $350,- 
000.00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Pro- 
visional Directors: Messrs. Stephen Moffatt Hay, James Walter 
Curry, Jos. Bingeman, James Kenniston Paisley and Elmer 
Eugene Wallace. 

The Pittsburgh-Cobalt Company, Ltd.— Capital $75,000.00, 
in shares of $10.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Provisional 
Directors: Messrs. Chas. D. Robbins, Sydney Frederick Heckert, 
Wm. Alfred McCutcheon, Harrison Orville Patch and Samuel 
McElroy. 

Toronto Cobalt Mining Company, Ltd.— Capital $300,000.00, 
in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Provisional 
Directors: Messrs. Hamilton Bender Wills, Whitford Vandusen 
and John Samuel Humberstone. 



Shipments, 187,598. 



198,017 



RECENT PUBLICATIONS. 

Report of the Klondike Gold Fields, by R. G. McConnell, B.A., 
Pt.B., Annual Report, Vol. XIV, Geological Survey of Canada, 
Ottawa, 1905. This report is based on field work carried on 
during the season of 1903. Parts of the preliminary report on 
the district, published in 1900, are also incorporated in the 
present report. 

Report on the Geology of a Portion of Eastern Ontario, by 
R. W. Ells, LL.D., Pt. J. Annual Report, Vol. XIV, Geological 
Survey of Canada. This report should accompany carbon sheet 
119, compiled by Mr. Jos. Keele, B.A., Sc., and deals with the 
geology and mineral resources of the large area contained therein. 

Report of the Bureau of Mines, Ontario, 1905, Vol. XIV, Pt. 
I, Toronto, 1905. This voluminous report is comprised in a 
volume of 375 pages, and is divided into chapters, the first 
being a statistical review of mining conditions in the Province 
for the year 1904, the second, an account of the summer mining 
classes, by Dr. W. L. Goodwin, while the mines of Western 
Ontario are discussed by Mr. W. E. H. Carter; the mines of 
Eastern Ontario, by Mr. E. T. Corkill, who also contributes a 
chapter on "Petroleum and Natural Gas." Mr. P. Gillespie 
writes on the cement industry of Ontario, while there is an 
account of the explorations in Abitibi, by Mr. J. G. McMillan; 
a chapter on the Loon Lake iron-bearing district, by Mr. W. 
N. Smith, and on the Boston Township iron range, by the 
Provincial Geologist, Mr. W. G. Miller; and a long and interest- 
ing report on the iron ranges of Michipicoten West, by Mr. J. M. 
BeU. 



38 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



The total mineral production (metallic and non-metallic) 
ol Ontario, during 1904, was valued at $11,572,647.00. This, 
rather less than five million dollars, represented metallic pro- 
duction. 

The Nature of Ore deposits, by Dr. Richard J3eck, Professor 
of Geology and Economic Geology, Freiberg Mining Academy, 
translated and revised by Walter Harvey Weed, E.N., with 
272 figures and a map, 2 Vols., first edition. The' Engineering 
and Mining Journal, New York and London, 190.5. We have; 
received a copy of this valuable work, a comprehensive review 
of which will appear in a iiiture issue. 

The Colliery Manager's Pocket Book, 1906. We have re- 
ceived from the publishers, The Colliery Ciuardian Company, 
Ltd., London, E.G., a copy of this useful pocket book and diary' 
which is now in its 37th year of issue. The book contains 
much useful information of a character required by engineers 
and others engaged in working coal mines. 



NOVA SCOTIA MINING INTELLIGENCE. 

Our special correspondent sends us the following list of 
areas applied for during the month of November: — 

DISTRICT. AREAS. 

Stormont 227 

Oldham 20 

Little Beaver Lake 30 

Montague 29 

Malaga .......'.['.'.'. 6 

Brookfield 4g 

Salmon River 233 

Sheet Harbour • 4(5 

Shiers Point g 

Kemptville 26 

Gold River _ 3 

Renfrew g 

Chezzettcook j2 

Mills Village 18 

St. Pauls Brook. ^ 20 

Lake Catcha 25 

Total 746 

In November the Anderson mill at Lake Catcha crushed 
29 tons quartz, which yielded 23oz. 17dwt. Ogrs. gold. In 
November at the Taylor mill, Oldham, 531 tons quartz crushed 
yielded 547oz. of gold. 



METAL MARKET CONDITIONS. 

Copper. — In a recent circular Messrs. Morrison Kekewich 
& Co., of London, write as follows: — 

Copper conditions are very strong and most interesting, 
and there has been active trading, as prices have advanced. 
Cash standard is £2 higher, and three months £1 15s. The 
position now is acute, consumption is increasing and already 
larger than even the increased production can keep pace with. 
Electrical and other demands are taking very large quantities. 
There is now no available copper before March-April, and con- 
sumers are in an awkward position. There are no stocks any- 
where, and the .short selling has been chiefly done by those who 
have no knowledge of the real situation, which has been devel- 
oped so strongly and promises to continue even more so. 

In their med-monthly report on copper, Messrs. Jas. Lewis 
& Sons write: — 

J -a; ^l^^ dearth of copper has become very acute, and great 
dithculty is experienced by manufacturers in obtaining neces- 
.sary supplies for delivery during the next two or three months. 
tor prompt and early delivery excessive prices are being paid 
and fuU prices for delivery in three or four months. The cover- 
ing of "bear" .sales forced up the value of standard copper to 
£81 lor January delivery and to £80 for three months' prompt 
on the 14th mst.— an advance of £3 5s. on early and £2 lOs on 
lorward delivery since the 1st inst.— but the pressure of sales 
to realize profits reduced it to £80 and £79 2s. 6d. on the 15th- 
the closing value to-day is £79 2s. 6d. and £78 15s. Od. For 
best selected ingots £88 10s. has hw.n paid— the highest price 
for niany years. English high condiu^f ivity wire bars are not 
obtamabl<! for dclivtTy before March, while" American wire bars 
only ofler for April delivery at £87 per ton, 18i cents per lb. 
having Ix^eii [laid l)y American consumers for delivery ui) to 



May; the quotation for Lake being 18J to 19 cents per lb 
though a sale at 19J cents is reported. Large sales of Japanese' 
copper continue to Ije made to ICurop(; for delivery in three to 
six months' t ime, and it was reported on t he 7th "inst. in well- 
inlormed (juarters in New York that of the copper purchased 
there and shipped to (,'hina some 20,000 tons had been resold 
to Europe at prices 30s. to 60s. per ton below the. prevailing 
quotations. Leading authorities, however, deny f hiit the cman- 
tity sold IS as large as 20,000 tons, but undoubtedlv a consider- 
able quantity will b(! shippcjd from China to Europe. The 
prevailing "famine" may therefore conlinue for another two 
or three months, but after that time it will probably be relieved 
by the receipt of additional su])i)lies from Japan and China 
Larger shipments to Europe may also be expe(;ted from the 
United States as no more copper is likelv to be shipped to China 
tor some tune to come, and it is very doubtful if the recent 
apparent increase in the home consumption (as shown by the 
following figures) will continue, good part of it being probably 
due to delay in forwarding ore and fuel from the mines and col- 
lieries to the smelting works in consequence of the temporary 
scarcity of railway wagons. Undoubtedly the present high 
^^ame of copper will greatly stimulate its production, while it 
will reduce its consumption in some directions — notably in the 
inanutacture of sulphate of copper. The production of copper 
m the ITnited States is this year believed by those best qualified 
to judge, to have increased about 12J per cent, over that of 1904. 

The latest New York quotations are: — lake, 18* at 18?- 
electrolytic, 181 at 18J; casting copper, 18| at 18^. 

Lead. — The London market continues to show strength 
English lead being quoted at £17 lis. 3d.; Spanish lead, £17 
10s. The American Smelting and Refining Co. has recently 
fixed Its pricesat 5 . 60 New York and 5 . 52 J St. Louis. 

Spelter.— London quotations are £28 1.5s. at £29. Recent 
sales in the St. Louis market have ranged from 6. 47* at 6.50 
Zinc has been selling in sheets f.o.b. cars Lasalle and Peru widths 
from 32 to 60 in., and lengths from 84 to 96 inches at $7 75 per 
100 lbs. 

Silver. — Prices last month ranged from 65J to 65|. 

Iron and Steel.— The Engineering and Mining Journal 
states that foundry iron is quiet and prices unchanged. For 
northern iron the following prices are quoted:— No. IX $19 at 
.$19.25; No. 2X, $18.25 at $18.75; No. 2 plain, $17 75 at 
$18.25; gray forge, $16. .50 at $17; Virginia foundrj^ is held at 
$18.60 at $19. 10 for. No. 1, and $18.25 at $18.75 for Alabama 
$18.60 at $19.10 for No. 1, and $18.10 at $18 60 for No 2 
Basic has been $18.25 at $18.75 for Alabama, and 25c. less for 
Northern. For Southern iron, on dock, quotations are- No 1 
foundry, $18.75; No. 2, $18.25; No. 3, $17.50; No. 4, $17- 
No. 1 soft,- $18.75; No. 2 soft, $18.25; gray forge, $16.50. 
Southern prices are firm, and a little extra is asked for special 
deliveries, especially on No. 2 soft. Prices for cast iron pipe 
are steady on a basis of $28.75 per net ton for 6-in. pipe, car- 
load lots at tidewater points. 

Iron bars are 1.845 at 1.895c. for common and 1.94.5c. 
for refined. St^ll higher prices are expected. Steel bars are 
1.745c., tidewater. Store trade is done at about 2..50c. for iron 
and 2.25c. for steel. Steel plates are still in strong demand. 
Tank plates are 1.745 at 1.825c.; flange and boiler, 1.845 at 
1.945c.; universal and sheared plates, 1.745c. up, according to 
width. 

Steel Rails. — No change in standard sections. Light 
rails are in demand, prices ranging from $26 for 35-lb., up to 
$33 for 12-lb. rails. Girder rails are not in request just now, 
in this territory. 



MINING AND INDUSTRIAL SHARE MARKET. 

(Specially Reported by Messrs. Robert Meredith & Co. Montreal.) 

The market for mining stocks is gradually undergoing a 
change, and there is now a considerable enquiry for many of 
the stocks in the Rossland district. 

The consolidation of the War Eagle with the Centre Star, 
and the report of an ore strike in the latter mine has created 
a (juict demand for the stock of this property, and has also 
brought enquiries for other stocks, which for a long time past 
have been almost forgotten. 

In the Boundary district the Granby Consolidated is the 
only stock in which there is any trading, but in the eastern 
district the Silver Lead properties are now looking up; in spite 
of the disaster, iho. St. Eugene has paid its (luarterly dividend 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



39 



as usual, and this has drawn attention to this property, and 
Canadian Gold Fields Syndicate. 

Amongst the industrials the common stock of the Dominion 
Iron & Steel has been the feature, and there has been quite a 
big speculation in it. 

Nova Scotia Steel has also participated in the improvement 
of the Steel industrj-. In Dominion Coal there has been but 
little doing. 

There is a strong undertone to all markets just now, and 
the indications are that this year will see speculation again 
turned to mining stocks, and that the industrials will partici- 
pate in the improved trade of the countrj-. 

The following are the latest quotations: — 

Par value 

of shares. Asked. Bid. 

.10 Canadian Ciold Fields Svndicate. .05J .05 

1.00 Centre Star ."^ 35i .34^ 

1.00 Deer Trail Consolidated 01 i — 

1.00 Giant 03* — 

10.00 Granby Consolidated 10| .10^ 

10.00 Montreal and Boston — — 

1.00 North Star 00 .04^ 

1.00 PajTie - - .02 

1.00 Rambler Cariboo 40 .15 

1.00 Republic - — 

1.00 St. Eugene .50 .49 

1.00 White Bear 04 .00 

100.00 Nova Scotia Steel (common) 68 .66 

100.00 Nova Scotia Steel (preferred) 122.00 118.00 

100.00 Dominion Coal (common) 78.00 76.00 

100.00 Dominion Coal (preferred) 123.00 121.00 

100.00 Dominion Iron and Steel (ocm.) .. 27.00 26.50 
100.00 Dominion Iron and Steel (pfd.) . . . 76.00 74.00 
Dominion Iron and Steel (bonds) . 84 . 00 82 . 50 



Two 50-h.p. boilers, and compressor and other plant, have 
been installed at the O'Brien mine, at Cobalt. 

At the Preston and Elkhorn mines, at Greenwood, B.C., 
electric hoists have been recently installed. These hoists were 
supplied by the Denver Engineering Works. 



RECENT MINING AND METALLURGICAL 
PATENTS. 

(Specially reported for the Canadi.\n Mining Review.) 

804,053— Coke-Oven. Mathew E. Rothberg, Cleveland,Ohio. 

A coking-oven having in combination a series of ad- 
jacent coking-chambers, reverting heating-flues in the 
side walls of the coking-chambers, a transverse stack- 
draft flue in the foundation at one end of said heating- 
flues, vertical off-gas flues connecting said stack-draft 
flue with said heating-flues, a transverse air-supply 
flue in the foundation parallel to said stack-draft flue 
and at the other end of said heating-flues, and com- 
bustion chambers under the ovens and having con- 
nection with said air-supply flue. 

803,544 — Apparatus for Refining Lead by Electrolysis. Anson 
G. Betts, Troy, N.Y. 

The combination with a cathode, an anode and an 
electrolyte adapted to dissolve metal from the anode 
and electrodeposit the same; of a containing- vat having 
its inner surface formed of a metal capable of being 
dissolved in said electrolyte and of a potential inter- 
mediate between that of th'e cathode and that of the 
anode. 



INDUSTRIAL NOTES. 

We have received from the B. Greening Wire Company a 
handsome calendar for the new year. The firm writes as follows: 
— ' ' Since last we had the pleasure of addressing you we have 
issued our new catalogue — one for each department. We hope 
you received yours safely, but should you not have done so, or 
should it have become mislaid, let us know, naming the line 
you are particularly interested in, and we shall have pleasure 
in forwarding you another. C)ur painting tower, destroyed by 
fire last March, has been rebuilt with all the latest improvements 
we could hear of or our experience could suggest, and we are now 
turning out Screen Cloth in 100 ft. or 50 ft. either green or 
black. Kindly note 100 ft. rolls are the standard. Our Netting 
Mill is running full time, and we fully expect to be able to meet 
any demand that may be made upon us for this or Screen Cloth. 
We particularly request correspondence regarding any of our 
lines. In wishing you the compliments of the season and a 
prosperous 1906, we desire to thank our numerous friends and 
customers for past favors, and solicit a continuance of same." 

Mr. C. S. Powell, general agent of the Westinghouse Electric 
& Mfg. Company, who has for sometime occupied offices at 11 
Pine Street, New York, has removed to the offices of the Com- 
pany on the 19th floor of the Trinity Building, 111 Broadway. 
The Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Company, in addition to 
their offices in the Hanover Building at 11 Pine Street, occupy 
the entire 19th floor of the Trinity Building. 

The Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Company are doing a 
large business in equipping mines with electric locomotives, to 
replace the older forms of haulage, whether animal or mechanical. 
Electric mine haulage considered from either the points of 
efficiency or economy, has so many advantages, as compared to 
the older practice, that the time is not far distant when any 
other method of mine haulage will be the exception. A recent 
contract closed by the Westinghouse Company is one with the 
New^jort Mining Company, who have decided to equip their 
mines at Ironton, Mich., with both surface and underground 
electric haulage. They will use electric locomotives the year 
around in the various levels underground for bringing the ore to 
the bottom of the shaft, and after the transportation season has 
closed will use electric locomotives on the surface for hauling ore 
from the top of the shaft to the various stock piles for storage. 
For these purposes they have ordered 6 four-ton Westinghouse 
mine locomotives. Electrical apparatus for the equipment of 
the necessary power station will also be provided by the West- 
inghouse Company, consisting of a 150 Kw., 250 volt generator, 
direct-connected to a Corliss engine of 130 r.p.m., and a three 
panel switchboard, besides other auxiliary apparatus. 



803,886— Treatment of Iron Ores, etc. Carleton Ellis, New 
York, N.Y. 

Process for reducing iron ores which consists in treating 
a progressively-advancing stream of the ore with a 
flame of high heat intensity and in interposing between 
said flame and ore a flame or current of a reducing 
character. 

803,830— Ore Concentrator. James J. Kennedy, Guthrie, Okla. 

In an ore-concentrator, a sluice-box, means for de- 
livering ore thereto at a point near its bottom, and 
means for supplying air to the box in a plane above 
that of the feed of the ore and toward the top of the 
box. 

803,737 — Furnace for Smelting Ore. Ralph Baggaley, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

A matte-furnace having converting-twyers near the 
bottom adapted to play into a clean body of molten 
matte, smelting-twyers above adapted to play into a 
floating charge, connections extending from the con- 
verting and smelting twyers and supplying thereto air 
under pressure, and a burner supplying heat abov^the 
smelting-twyers. 

804,186 — Process of Treating Ore-Slimes, etc., containing Gold, 
Silver, or other values. Louis J. Drabek, Turner, 
S.D. 

A process of treating ore-slimes to obtain values there- 
from, charing the slimes with a cyanid solution into 
a tank causing the slimes to settle and accumulate in 
thickness in the bottom of said tank discharging the 
thickened portion by its own weight and that of the 
overlying solution into the top of a second tank having 
a barren solvent solution therein, filtering off the value 
containing solution, allowing the heavy slimes to settle 
and accumulate in the bottom of said tank, discharging 
them into a third tank where they are washed with 
water, and then filtering the values from the slimes so 
treated. 

804,412 — Dumping Car. John H. Kelly, San Francisco, Cal. 

The combination of a truck, a car-body tilting thereon, 
a swinging gate closing the front end of said car-body, 
a cable secured at its ends to said gate and to the frame, 
parts carried by said frame and car-body around which 
the cable passes, the position of the parts being such 
that when the car-body is tilted the cable is relaxed to 
allow the gate to swing open. 



40 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



804,408— Gold Separator. Frederick M. Johnson, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., assignor to Rose (iold Reclamation Com- 
pany, San Francisco, Cal., a Clorporation of Arizona. 
In a gold-separator, a box or sluice having a retaining- 
bottom composed of fibrous or textile material, in 
combination with wire screens; arranged one above 
the other and in contact, and forming two continuous 
layers, the vipper layer being, alternately, such wire 
screen and such fibrous or textile material. 

804,227 — Mechanical Roasting or Desulfurizing Furnace. Henry 
Howard, Brookline, Mass., assignor to Merrimac 
Chemical Company, North Woburn, Mass., a Corpora- 
tion of Massachusetts. In a furnace, a drying-chamber 
mounted thereon to receive and dry the material to 
be treated, manually-controlled means to directly in- 
troduce waste heat from the furnace into the drying- 
chamber and subject the contents thereof to the 
action of such heat, an agitating device within the 
chamber, and means to positively feed the dried 
material from the chamber into the interior of the 
furnace. 

804,751 — Roasting Furnace. Augu.st R. Meyer, Kansas Csty, 
Mo., assignor to The United Zinc and Chemical Com- 
pany, Kansas City, Mo., a Corporation of New Jersey. 
The combination in a furnace, of a hollow shaft, a 
series of hollow arms extending in pairs from the op- 
posite sides of the shaft and communicating with the 
latter, a rod extending centrally through the shaft, 
and a series of partitions extending across the shaft 
between its ends and centrally through the arms and 
supported in part by said rod. 

804,466 — Concentrating and Amalgamating Table. John A. 
Hamilton, St. Peters, South Au,stralia, Australia. 
The combination with a table ,and means to freely 
suspend it, of a rotatable shaft, a shaft-section on the 
end thereof, a universal joint connecting the shaft and 
shaft-section, a weight connected to and eccentric to 
the shaft-section, and means fixed to the table and 
through which the shaft-section can freely move longi- 
tudinally, whereby the table is moved in elliptical 
paths when the shaft is rotated. 

805,017 — Metal Leaching process. Thomas B. Joseph, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

A process of extracting metals such as gold, silver, 
copper and nickel from ores containing the same when 
in a suitable condition, which consists in subjecting 
the said ore to the leaching action of a solution con- 
taining water, sodium cyanid and ammonium car- 
bonate, the carbonate being in excess of the cyanid, 
and precipitating the metals from the solution by any 
well-known method. 

805,090 — Amalgamator. Charles W. Patten, Lynn, Mass. 

An amalgamator comprising an elongated, mercurj^- 
containing trough, having a weir at its discharge en'd, 
one or more submerging drums at the inlet end thereof, 
and means for discharging a series of water-jets on to 
the surface of the mercury between said weir and said 
drums, and adjacent the latter. 

804,870— Ore Distributing Car. Ralph S. Moore, Portsmouth, 
Ohio. 

The combination of a floor made up of moveable sec- 
tions, and suitable means for, successively separating 
the same one from the other beneath their load, from 
one end of said floor. 

805,215— Ore Concentrator. Matthew R. Lyle, Oakland, Cal. 

A concentrator comprising an inclined sluice-box having 
elongated openings at the bottom thereof, channels 
presenting elevated edges at the edges of said openings, 
and means for rocking said box so as to advance the 
material contained therein progressively by gravitation 
toward the lower extremities of said openings. 

805,289— Magnet u: Separator. Harry l). Heath, Windsor, Conn., 
assignor to (ScnerMl Electrics Company, :i Corporation 
of New York. 

The combination with a stationary conductor, of a 
plurality of p(ile-pi(!ces travelling longitudinally thereof 
and in i)roximity thereto, and means for conveying the 
material to be treated beneath said pole-pieces. 



804,936— Metallurgical Process. Willis E. Everette, Tacoma 
Wash. 

A process which consists in first, in preparing a suitable 
preliminary melt and heating it to incandescence; 
second, in subjecting the previously-pulverized ma- 
terials, which are to be treated, to the action of liquid 
oxygen, whereby they are reduced to an extremely- 
frigid condition and are caused to occlude a portion 
of said oxygen; third, forcing this frigid mixture info 
and through the incandescent melt whereby the metals 
in said mixture are largely freed from sulphur and 
phosphorus and are rapidly fused, and finally separ- 
ately drawing off the metafand slag at different levels. 

805,854— Magnetic Ore-Separator. Eric Hedburg, Joplin, Mo., 
assignor by mesne assignments, to American Reduc- 
tion Company, Chicago, 111., a Corporation of Arizona. 
In a compound magnetic ore-separator and in com- 
bination a vertical shaft, an upper and a lower electro- 
magnet mounted axially thereon, each magnet being 
provided with two pole-pieces which form a shell in- 
closing the windings, and with a non-magnetic ring 
having a central outwardly-extended flange upon 
which the contiguous edges of the pole-pieces rest 
whereby the latter are separated, said pole-pieces 
having air-passages therethrough, means for supplying 
a current of air to the interior of the lower magnet, and 
means for conducting the current of air from the lower 
magnet into the interior of the upper magnet. 

805,-577 — Treatment of Ores and the like. James Nicholas, 
Waterloo, England. ' 
The treatment of materials containing zinc, by mixing 
the pulverized materials with water, and with a chlorid, 
and then heating the mixture, leaching this so-treated 
mixture with water, and reducing the metallic com- 
pounds contained in the leached residue to a metallic 
state. 

805,836 — Method of Producing Iron. Ralph Baggaley, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

A process which consists in precipitating on screen 
material a crust of iron-and sulphur bearing impurities 
from furnace-fumes, removing sulphur therefrom and 
then smelting the residue and recovering the iron. 

805,783 — Electric Furnace. John S. Dorian, Niagara Falls, 
N.Y., assignor to Cora M. Dorian, Niagara Falls, N.Y.' 
An electric furnace comprising a heating-chamber, a 
pair of electrodes arranged in the chamber, and a re- 
sistance member electrically connected said electrodes, 
one of said electrodes being movable lengthwise of the 
resistance member for varying the extent of its ex- 
posure or its heating effect. 

805,555 — Process for refining Copper-Nickel Matte. Noak V. 
Hybinette, Westfield, N.J. 

A process which consists in first roasting the matte 
to oxides, then leaching with weak sulphuric acid; 
thereby extracting principally sulphate of copper, then 
heating with sulphuric acid at least to a temperature 
where hydrous sulphates do not exist, leaching with 
weak sulphuric acid, thereby extracting principally 
sulphate of copper, then heating with hydrochloric acii 
to a temperature enough for partial decomposition 
of the anhydrous chlorids, leaching with weak acid 
and repeating the said heating when necessary thereby 
obtaining a nickel oxide, suitable for refining by 
ordinary means. 

805,835 — Fluxing Copper Ores. Ralph Baggaley, Pittsburg, Pa. 

A method which consists in charging into a copper 
smelting blast-furnace metallic iron as a flux. 



MAJOR DAVID BEAMES, 

Late I.S.C., and of Berl^}|ampstead, England. 

If the above will communicate with C. J. Walker s 
Advertising Agency, 24 Coleman Street, London, 
England, he may hear of something to his advantage. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XXIU 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC 

The Attention of Miners and Capitalists in the United States 
and in Europe is invited to the 

Gfreat Mineral Territory 

Open for Investment in the Province of Quebec. 



Gold, Silver, Copper, Iron, Asbestos, Mica, Plumbag-o, Phosphate, 

Chromic Iron, Galena, Etc. 

Ornamental and Structural Materials in Abundant Variety. 

The Mining Law gives absolute security to Title, and has been 
specially framed for the encouragement of Mining. 



Mining lands are sold on the express condition that the 
purchaser shall commence bona fide to mine within two years 
from the date of purchase, and shall not spend less than $500 
if mining for the superior metals; and not less than $200 if for 
inferior metals. In default, cancellation of sale of mining lands. 

(b) Licenses may be obtained from the Commissioner on 
the following terms: — Application for an exploration and pros- 
pecting license, if the mine is on private land, $2 for every 100 
acres or fraction of 100; if the mine is on Crown lands (1) in 
surveyed territory, $5 for every 100 acres, and (2) in unsurveyed 
territory, $5 for each square mile, the license to be valid for three 
months and renewable. The holder of such license may after- 
wards purchase the mine paying the prices mentioned. 

Licenses for mining are of two kinds: Private lands licenses 
where the mining rights belong to the Crown, and public lands 
licenses. These licenses are granted on payment of a fee of $5 
and an annual rental of $1 per acre. Each license is granted for 
200 acres or less, but not for more; is valid for one year, and is 
renewable on the same terms as those on which it was originally 
granted. The Governor-in-Council may at any time require 
the payment of the royalty in lieu of fees for a mining license 
and the annual rental — such royalties, unless otherwise deter- 
mined by letters patent or other title from the Crown, being 
fixed at a rate not to exceed three per cent, of the value at the 
mine of the mineral extracted after deducting the cost of mining 
it. 



Minmg concessions are divided into three classes: — j 

1 . In unsurveyed territory (a) the first class contains 400 j 
acres, (b) the second, 200 acres, and (c) the third, 100 acres. 

2. In surveyed townships the three classes respectively 
comprise one, two and four lots. 

All lands supposed to contain mines or ores belonging to 
the Crown may be acquired from the Commissioner of Coloniza- 
tion and Mines (a) as a mining concession by purchase, or (b) 
be occupied and worked under a mining license. 

No sale of mining concessions containing more than 400 
acres in superficies can be made by the Commissioner to the 
same person. The Govenor-in-Council may, however, grant 
a larger • extent of territory up to 1,000 acres under special 
circumstances. 

The rates charged and to be paid in full at the time of the 
purchase are $5 and $10 per acre for mining lands containing 
the superior metals*; the first named price being for lands 
situated more than 12 miles and the last named for lands situated 
less than 12 miles from the railway. 

If containing the inferior metal S2 and $4 according to 
distance from railway. 

Unless stipulated to the contrary in the letters patent in 
concessions for the mining of superior metals, the purchaser 
has the right to mine for all metals found thereon; in concessions 
for the mining of the inferior metals, those only may be mined 
for. 

*The superior metals include the ores of gold, silver, lead, copper, 
nickel, graphite, asbestos, mica, and phosphate of lime. The words inferior 
metals include all other minerals and ores. 



The fullest information will be cheerfully given on application to 

THE MINISTER OF LANDS, MINES AND FISHERIES, 

PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, QUEBEC. 



xxiv 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Ontario's 

MINING 
LANDS 



THE Crown domain of the Province of Ontario contains an area 
of over 100,000,000 acres, a large part of which is comprised 
in geological formations known to carry valuable minerals 
and extending northward from the great lakes and westward from 
the Ottawa river to the Manitoba boundary. 

Iron in large bodies of magnetite and hematite; copper in sulphide 
and native form; gold, mostly in free milling quartz; silver, native 
and sulphides; zincblendes, galena, pyrites, mica, graphite, talc, marl, 
brick clay, building stones of all kinds and other useful minerals have 
been found in many places and are being worked at the present time. 

In the famous Sudbury region Ontario possesses one of the two 
sources of the world's supply of nickel, and the known deposits of this 
metal are very large. Recent discoveries of corundum in Eastern 
Ontario are believed to be the most extensive in existence. 

The output of iron, copper and nickel in 1903 was much beyond 
that of any previous year, and large developments in there industries 
are now going on. 

In the older parts of the Province salt, petroleum and natural 
gas are important products. 

The mining laws of Ontario are liberal, and the prices of mineral 
lands low. Title by freehold or lease, on working conditions for seven 
years. There are no royalties. 

The climate is unsurpassed, wood and water are plentiful, and in 
the summer season the prospector can go almost anywhere in a 
canoe. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway runs through the entire mineral 

belt. 

For reports of the Bureau of Mines, maps, mining laws, etc., apply 

to 

HON. FRANK COCHRANE, 

Commissioner of Lands and Mines. 

or 

THOS. W. GIBSON, 

Director Bureau of Mines, 

Toronto, Ontario. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XXV 




PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 

Leases fo[ Mines ol Gold, Sita, Coal koo, Copper, Lead, Tin 



PRECIOUS STONES. 



TITLES GIVEN DIRECT FROM THE CROWN, ROYALTIES AND RENTALS MODERATE. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 



Under the provisions of Chap. 1, Acts of 1892. of Mines and Minerals, 
Licenses are issued for prospecting Gold and Silver for a term of twelve 
months. Mines of Gold and Silver are laid off in areas of 150 by 250 feet, 
any number of which up to one hundred can be included in one License, 
provided that the length of the block does not exceed twice its width. The 
cost is 50 cents per area. Leases of any number of areas are granted for a 
term of 40 years at .S2.00 per area. These leases are forfeitable if not worked, 
but advantage can be taken of a recent Act by which on payment of 50 cents 
annuaUy for each area contained in the lease it becomes non-forfeitable if 
the labor be not performed. 



Licenses are issued to owners of quartz crushing mUls, who are required 
to pay Royalty on all the Gold they extract at the rate of two per cent, on 
smelted Gold valued at $19 an ounce, and on smelted Gold valued at $18 
an ounce. 

Applications for Licenses or Leases are receivable at the office of the 
Commissioner of Public Works and Mines each week day from 10 a.m. to 
4 p.m., except Saturday, when the hours are from 10 to 1. Licenses are 
issued in the order of application according to priority. If a person dis- 
covers Gold in any part of the Province, he may stake out the boundaries 
of the areas he desires to obtain, and this gives him one week and twenty- 
four hours for every 15 miles from Halifax in which to make application at 
the Department for his ground 



MINES OTHER THAN GOLD AND SILVER. 



Licenses to search for eighteen months are issued, at a cost of thirty 
dollars, for minerals other than Gold and Silver, out of which areas can be 
selected for mining under lease. These leases are for four renewable terms 
of twenty years each. The cost for the first year is fifty dollars, and an 
annual rental of thirty dollars secures each lease from liability to forfeiture 
for non working. 

All rentals are refunded if afterwards the areas are worked and pay 
royalties. All titles transfer;, etc , of minerals are registered by the Mines 
Department for a nominal te" and provision is made for lessees and licensees 
whereby they can acquire promptly, either by arrangement with the owner 
or by arbitration, all lands required for thier mining works. 

The Government as a security for the payment of royalties, makes tht 
royalties fir.t lieu on the plant and pxtures of the mine. 



The unusually generous condition under which the Government of 
Nova Scotia grants its minerals have introduced many outside capitalists, 
who have always stated that the Mining laws of the Province were the best 
they had had experience of. 

The royalties on the remaining minerals are; Copper, four cents on 
every unit; Lead, two cents upon every unit; Iron, five cents on every ton; 
Tin and Precious Stones, five per cent.; Coal, 10 cents on every ton sold. 

The Gold district of the Province extends along its entire Atlantic 
coast, and varies in width from 10 to 40 miles, and embraces an area of over 
three thousand miles, and is traversed by good roads and accessible at all 
points by water. Coal is known in the Counties of Cumberland, Colchester 
Pictou, and Antigonish, and at numerous points in the Island of Cape Breton. 
The ores iA Iron, Copper, etc., are met at numerous points, and are being 
rapidly secured by miners and investors. 



'^--»ies of the Mining Law and any information can be had on apphcation to 

The Hon.W.T. PIPES, 

Commissioner Public Works and Mines, 

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA. 



xxvi 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 





DOMINION OF CANADA 



SYNORSIS OF REIGiULATIOrsJS 

For disposal of Minerals on Dominion Lands in Manitoba, the North- 
west Territories and the Yukon Territory, 



COAL. 



Coal lands may be purchased at $10 per acre for soft 
coal and $20 for anthracite. Not more than 320 acres can be 
acquired by one individual or company. Royalty at the rate 
of ten cents per ton of 2,000 pounds .shall be collected on the 
gross output. 

QUARTZ. 

Persons of eighteen years and over and joint stock com- 
panies holdmg free miner's certificates may obtain entry for a 
mining location. 

A free miner's certificate is granted for one or more 
years, not exceeding five, upon payment in advance of $7.50 
per annum for an individual, and from $50 to $100 per annum 
for a company, according to capital. 

A free miner, having discovered mineral in place, may 
locate a claim 1,500 x 1,.500 feet by marking out the same with 
two legal posts, bearing location notices, one at each end on the 
line of the lode or vein 

The clairn shall be recorded within 15 days if located 
within ten miles of a mining recorder's oflice, one additional 
day allowed for every additional ten miles or fraction. The 
fee for recording a claim is $5. 

At least $100 must be expended on the claim each year 
or paid to the mining recorder in lieu thereof. When $500 
has been expended or paid, the locator may, upon having a 
survey made, and upon complying with other requirements 
purchase the land at $1.00 an acre. 

Permission may be granted by the Minister of the Interior 
to locate claims containing iron and mica, also copper, in the 
Yukon Territory of an area not exceeding 160 acres. 

The patent for a mining location shall provide for the 
payment of a Royalty of 2| per cent, of the sales of the pro- 
ducts of the location. 

PLACER MINING. 

Manitoba and the N. W. T., excepting the Yukon Terri- 
tory.— Placer mining claims generally are 100 feet square • 
entry fee $5, renewable yearly. On the North Saskatchewan 
River claims are either bar or bench, the former being 100 feet 
long and extending between high and low water mark. The 
latter includes bar diggings, but extends back to the base of 
the hill or bank, but not exceeding 1,000 feet. Where steam 
power is used, claims 200 feet wide may be obtained. 

Dredging in the rivers of Manitoba and the N. W. T 
excepting the Yukon Territory.— A free miner may obtain 
only two leases of five miles each for a term of twenty years 
renewable in the discretion of the Minister of the Interior. ' 

The lessee's right is confined to the submerged bed or 
bars of the river below low water mark, and subject to the 
rights of all persons who have, or who may receive entries 
for bar diggings or bench claims, except on the Saskatchewan 
River, where the lessee may dredge to high water mark on each 
alternate leasehold. 

The lessee shall have a dredge in operation within one 
season from the date of the lease for each five miles, but where 
a person or company has obtained more than one lease one 
dredge for each fifteen miles or fraction is sufficient. Rental 
$10 per annum for each mile of river leased. Royalty at the 
rate of two and a half per cent, collected on the output after it 
exceeds $10,000. 

Department of the Interior. 

Ottawa, February, 1904. 



DREDGING IN THE YUKON TERRITORY. 

Six lea.ses of five miles each may be granted to a free miner 
for a term of twenty years, also renewable. 

The lessee's right is confined to the submerged bed or 
bars in the river below low water mArk, that boundary to be 
fixed by its position on the 1st day of August in the vear of 
the date of the lease. 

The lessee shall have one dredge in operation within two 
years from the date of the lease, and one dredge for each five 
miles within six years from .such date. Rental, $100 per mile 
for first year and $10 per mile for each subsequent year. Royaltv 
same as placer mining. " ' 

PLACER MINING IN THE YUKON TERRITORY. 

Creek, gulch, river and hill claims shall not exceed 250 
feet in length, measured on the base line or general direction 
of the creek or gulch, the width being from 1,000 to 2 000 feet 
All other placer claims shall be 250 feet square. 

Claims are marked by two legal posts, one at each end 
bearing notices. Entry must be made within ten davs, if the 
claim is within ten miles of mining recorder's office. One extra 
day allowed for each additional ten miles or fraction. 

The person or company staking a claim must hold a' free 
miner's certificate. 

The discoverer of a new mine is entitled to a claim of 1,000 
feet in length, and if the party consists of two, 1,500 feet alto- 
gether, on the output of which no royalty shall be charged the 
rest of the party ordinary claims only. ' 

Entrj' fee, $10. Royalty at the rate of two and one-half 
per cent, on the value of the gold shipped from the Yukon 
Territory to be paid to the Comptroller. 

No free miner shall receive a grant of more than one mining 
claim on each separate river, creek or gulch, but the sama 
miner may hold any number of claims by purchase, and free 
miners may work their claims in partnership bv filing notice 
and paying fee of $2. A claim may be abandoned, and another 
obtained on the same creek, gulch or river, by giving notice 
and paying a fee. 

Work must be done on a claim each year to the value of 
at least $2200. 

A certificate that work has been done must be obtained 
each year ; if not, the claim shall be deemed to be abandoned 
and open to occupation and entry by a free miner. ' 

The boundaries of a claim may be defined absolutely by 
having a survey made and publishing notices in the Yukon 
Official Gazette. 

PETROLEUM. 

All unappropriated Dominion Lands in Manitoba, the 
North-West Territories and within the Yukon Territory are 
open to prospecting for petroleum, and the Minister may 
reserve for an individual or company having machinery on 
the land to be prospected, an area of 640 acres. Should the 
prospector discover oil in paying quantities, and satisfactorily 
establish such discovery, an area not exceeding 640 acres, in- 
cluding the oil well and such other land as may be determined 
will be sold to the discoverer at the rate of $1.00 an acre subject 
to royalty at such rate as may be specified by order-in-council. 



W. W. CORY, 



Deputy of the Minister of the Interior. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xxvii 



DEEP DRILLING 

makes economical mining and the deepest hole 
can be drilled at the smallest cost by a 



DIAMOND 
ROCK DRILL 



it can cut through 2,500 feet of solid rock in a 
vertical line. It brings up solid cylinders of rock, 
showing formation and character. 



n 



Made in all capacities, for 
Hand or Horsepower, Steam 
or Compressed Air — mounted 
or unmounted. 



You will find lots of 
information in our 
new catalogue — may 
we send it? 




American Diamond RogI( Driil Company 

95 Liberty Street, NEW YORK CITY, U.S.A. 

Cable Address, "Occiduous," New York. 



XXV J 11 



THE CANADIAN MIl^ING REVIEW. 



HADFIELD'S—SHEFFIELD 

Hecloti Rock and Ore Breaker 

HADFIELD AND JACK'S PATENT 

The only Perfect Gyratory Stone-Crusher 

THE PARTS THAT ARE SUBJECT TO EXCESSIVE WEAR ARE MADE OF 

Hadfield's Patent "Era'' Maganese Steel 



WE MANUFACTURE JAW BREAKERS, CRUSHING ROLLS, 
ELEVATORS, BIN GATES, AND GOLD MINING REQUISITES. 




Sole Representatives of the Hadfleld Steel Foundry Company, Ltd., Sheffield, for Canada. 
PEACOCK BROTHERS, Canada Life Building, - Montreal. 



M. BEATTY & SONS, Limited 

WEZLLAND, ONTARIO 




DREDGES 
DERRICKS 
MINE HOISTS 
CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS 
for SAND and WATER 

STONE DERRICKS 
STEEL SKIPS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

DITCHERS 
STEAM SHOVELS 
HOISTING ENGINES 
SUBMARINE ROCK 

DRILLING MACHINERY 

CLAM-SHELL BUCKETS 



COAL AND CONCRETE TUBS 



AND OTHER CONTRACTORS' MACHINERY 
AGENTS: 

E. Leonard & Sons, Montreal, Que., and St. John, N.B. The Stuart Machinery Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

The Wm. Hamilton Mfg. Co., Vancouver, B.C. 



HEINE SAFETY BOILER 




MANUFACTURED BY 



The Canadian Heine Safety Boiler Go. 



TORONTO. ONT. 



THE HEINE SAFETY BOILER-Made in un- 
its of 100 to 500 h.p., and can be set in batteries of any 
number. Suitable for Mines, Pulp Mills, Water and Elec- 
tric Installations, and large plants generally. The best 
and most economical boiler made. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



i 



Baldwin Locomotive Works 

Burnham, Williams & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 




Baldwin Compressed Air Mine Locomotive. 



LOCOMOTIVES FOR MINES AND FURNACES 




TELEsHAPH.c Address: LOBNITZ, RENFREW. 



DIAMOND DRILLS 

Our Drills are of the latest design and represent the 
highest point of perfection yet reached. Operated by- 
hand power, horse power, steam, air, and electricity. 
Send for Catalogue. 

STANDARD DIAMAND DRILL CO. 

Chamber of Commepce Building, Chieago, U.S.A. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 

LIMITED 

PROPRIETORS, MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF 

Sydney Mines Bituminous Goal 

Unexcelled Fuel for Steamships and Locomotives 
Manufactories, Rolling Mills, Forges, Glass Works 
Brick and Lime Burning, Coke, Gas Works, and 
for the Manufacture of Steel, Iron, etc. : : : : 

COLLIERIES AT SYDNEY MINES, CAPE BRETON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



HAMMERED AND ROLLED STEEL 

FOR MINING PURPOSES 

Pit Rails, Tee Rails, Edge Ralls, Fish Plates, Bevelled Steel Screen bars, Forged 
Steel Stamper Shoes and Dies, Blued Machinery Steel to V." Diar^eter sfeel 
Tub Axies Cut to Length, Crow Bar Steel, Wedge Steel, Hammer Steel Prck 
rtrue'^;:-.roor;J;t« ?n^h'! ^^'^ Comp^essedThaftrg'; 



A FULL STOCK OF 



MILD FLAT, RIVET-ROUND & ANGLE STEELS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 

Special Attention Paid to Miners' Requirements. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



STEEL WOBKS and Head Ollice: NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



iii 



COAL 

DOMINION COAL CO., LTD. 

GLACE BAY, C.B., CANADA 



MINERS OF 



BITUMINOUS COALS 

The celebrated ''Reserve" 
coal for Household use. 



"INTERNATIONAL" GAS COAL 

And the best steam coal from its 
Collieres on the Phalen seam. 



YEARLV OUTRUT 3,500,000 TONS 




Shipping facilities at Sydney and Louisburg, C.B., of most modern type. Steamers carrying 5,000 tons loaded in twenty- 
four hours. Special attention given to quick loading of sailing vessels, small vessels loaded with quickest despatch. 

BUNKER COAL 

The Dominion Coal Company has provided unsurpassed facilities for bunkering ocean-going steamers with despatch. Specia 
attention given to prompt loading. Steamers of any size are bunkered without detention. 

By improved screening appliances, lump coal for domestic trade is supplied, of superior quality. 
Prices, terms, etc., may be obtained at the offices of the Company. 

ALEXANDER DICK, General Sales Agent, Glace Bay, C.B. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, 112 St. James Street, Montreal, Que. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, 171 Lower Water Street, HaUfax, N.S. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, Quebec, Que. 

AND FROM THE FOLLOWING AGENTS : 



R. P. & W. F. STARR, St. John, N.B. 

PEAKE BROS. & CO., Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

HULL, BLYTH & CO., 4 Fenchurch Avenue, London, E.C. 



J. E. HARLOW, 95 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 
HARVEY & CO., St. Johns, Newfoundland. 
A. JOHNSON & CO., Stockholm, Sweden. 



G. H. DUGGAN, Third Vice-President. 



iv 



THE CANADIAN MIMING REVIEW. 




RUBBER GOODS 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 

FOR MINING PURPOSES 



Rubber Belting, Fire Hose, Steam and Air Hose, High Pressure 
" Star Red " Sheet Packing, Valve and Piston Packings, Sheave 
and Pulley Fillings, Rubber Bumpers, and Springs, Rubber 
Clothing and Boots, Etc. 



THE MARK OF QUALITY 

When you see this Trade Mark 
on a Rubber Article — 

IT'S RIGHT. 



The Canadian Rubber 
CoMPANYOF Montreal 

(LIMITED) 

Sales Branches and Warehouses : 

172 Granville St. - HALIFAX, N,S. 
Imperial Bank BIdg., MONTREAL, Que. 
Front & Vonge Sts. - TORONTO, Ont. 
Princess Street - WINNIPEG, Man . 
Cordova Street - VANCOUVER, B.C 




View of Factories, Montreal, Quebec. Floor area, 12 acres. 



DRUMMOND COAL 

The standard of excellence in Bituminous 
Coal and Coke for Blast Furnaces, Foun- 
dries, Manufacturing and Domestic Use. 

Reliable, Uoifoi and Stfictly High Giade 

Shipped from Pictou Harbour, Halifax, 
and all points on Intercolonial Railway 
and connections by the 

Intercolonial Coal 

Mining Co. Limited 

AGENTS: 

HUGH D. MacKENZIE, Halifax. 

DARROW, MANN & CO., Boston. 
CHAS. W. IVES, Pictou. 

ARTHUR E. SCOTT, Quebec. 

HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL, QUE. 



JAS. P. CLEGHORN, 

President. 



D. FORBES AUGUS. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



The Bank of British North America 



Established in 1836. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter in 1840. 
CAPITAL PAID UP - • • - 

RESERVE FUND . . - - . 



$4,866,667 
2,044,000 



LONOON OFFICE: 5 GRACECHURCH STREET, E.C. 



COURT OF DIRECTORS 



J. H. Brodie 
J. J. Carter 
H. R. Farrer 
G. Wallis, Secretary. 



M.G.C.Glyn 
R.H.Glyn 
E. A. Hoare 



H.J.B.KendaU 
F. Lubbock 
Geo. D. Whatman 
W. S. Goldby, Manager. 



HEAD OFFICE IN CANADA, ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL. 

H. Stikeman, Gen. Manager. J. Elmsly, Supt. of Branches. 



H. B. Mackenzie, Inspector. 
BRANCHES IN CANADA: 



Montreal, A. E. EUis, Loc 
Ontario 
London 

Market Sub-bch. 
Brantford 
Hamilton 

Barton St.Sub-bch 
Toronto 

Toronto Junction 
Toronto Junction 
" Stock Yards 
Weston (Sub-bch) 
Midland 
Fenelon Falls 
Bobcaygeon 
Campbellford 
Kingston 
Ottawa 



Mgr. 

Quebec 
Montreal 

" St. Catherine St. 
Longueuil (Sub-bch) 
Quebec 

Levis (Sub-branch) 

New Brunswick 
St. John 

St. John, Union St. 
Fredericton 

Nova Scotia 
Halifax 

Manitoba 
Winmpeg 
Brandon 
Reston 



J. R. Ambrose, Sub. Mgr. 

N. W. Territories 
Battleford 
Calgao' 
Duck Lake 
Estevan 
Rosthern 
York ton 

British Columbia 
Ashcroft 
Greenwood 
Kaslo 
Rossland 

Trail (Sub-branch) 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Yukon Terb. 
Dawson 



AGENCIES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

New York (52 Wall St.)— W. Lawson and J. C. Welsh, Agents. 
SanjFrancisco (120 Sansome St.) — H. M. J. McMichael and A. S. Ireland, 
Agents. 

Chicago — Merchants Loan & Trust Co. 

London Bankers — The Bank of England and Messrs. Glyn & Co. 

Foreign Agents — Liverpool — Bank of Liverpool. Scotland — National 
Bank of Scotland, Limited, and branches. Ireland — Provincial Bank of 
Ireland, Limited, and branches; National Bank, Limited, and branches. 
Australia — Union Bank of Australia, Ltd. New Zealand — Union Bank of 
Australia, Ltd. India, China and Japan — Mercantile Bank of India, Ltd. 
West Indies— Colonial Bank. Paris — Credit Lyonnais. Lyons — Credit 
Lyonnais. Agents in Canada for the Colonial Bank, London, and West 
Indies. 

i^Issues Circular Notes for Travellers available in all parts of the 
World. Drafts on South Africa and West Indies may be obtained at the 
Bank's Branches. 



I 
I 

i 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



V 



WALKER BROTHERS (WiGAN) LIMITED 

WIGAN, EINGL-AND. 




Largest Air Compressors in Canada 

. are of WALKER BROTHERS (Wigan) LIMITED manufacture. 



THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES HAVE INSTALLED WALKER BROTHERS AIR COMPRESSORS, 
IN CAPACITIES RANGING UP TO 6300 CUBIC FEET OF FREE AIR PER MINUTE, ALL 
OF WHICH ARE PROVIDED WITH WALKER PATENT AIR VALVES. 

Dominion Coal Company Ltd. Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company Ltd. 

Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. Belmont Gold Mine Ltd. 

Intercolonial Coal Mining Co. Ltd. Cape Breton Coal, iron & Railway Co. Ltd. 



Sole Canadian ^ ^% ^\ |^ ^5 ^^TT 1 I C 1^ Canada Life Building 

Representatives "t-MWwOf\ Dl^vJ I riQiKO MONTREAL, P.Q. 



vi 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



BY THE LINES OF THE 

Canadian 
Pacific 
Railway 

All important points in Canada and the United 
States can be reached. 

Fast Trains 

To Quebec, the Laurentians, Eastern Town- 
ships, St. John, N.B., Halifax, Boston, Wor- 
cester, Springfield, Mass., New York, Portland, 
Me., and the principal Atlantic Seaside resorts, 
Kawartha Lakes, Toronto, Niagara Falls, De- 
troit, Chicago, Ottawa, the Temiskaming, Mis- 
sissaga,French River, New Ontario, Sault Ste. 
Marie, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Winnipeg and 
the Western Prairies, the Kootenay Mining 
regions, the Mountains of British Columbia — 
unrivalled for scenic grandeur — Vancouver and 
the Pacific Coast. 

Fast Steamship 
Service 

On the Upper Lakes, Owen Sound to Fort 
William, on the inland waters of British Col- 
umbia, on the Pacific Coast to China, Japan, 
Australia, via Honolulu and Suva, and to 
Skagway en route to the Yukon. The fastest 
and most luxuriously furnished steamers be- 
tween Victoria, Vancouver and Seattle, and on 
the Atlantic Ocean between Bristol, London, 
Liverpool, Montreal and Quebec, in summer, 
and St. John in winter. 

Double Daily 
Transcontinental 
Train Service 

During summer months, and Daily Transcon- 
tinental Service during winter months. 

For illustrated pamphlets apply to any Can- 
adian Pacific Railway Agent, or to 

c. E. Mcpherson, c. e. e. ussher. 

General Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, 

Western Lines, Eastern Lines, 

WINNIPEG, Man. MONTREAL. 
ROBERT KERR, 

Passenger Traffic Manager, 

MONTREAL. 




AFFILIATED TO 
QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY 



Kingston, Ontario 



THE FOLLOWING COURSES ARE OFFERED 

1 . Three Years' Course for a Diploma in 

(a) Mining Engineering and Metallurgy. 

(b) Chemistry and Mineralogy. 

(c) Mineralogy and Geology. 

(d) Chemical Engineering. 

(e) Civil Engineering. 

(/) Mechanical Engineering. 

(g) Electrical Engineering. 

(h) Biology and Public Health, and 

2. Four Years' Course for a Degree (B.Sc.) in 

the same. 

3 . Courses in Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geol- 

ogy for degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

For futher information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

4. Post-Graduate Course for the Degree of 

Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) 

For further information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

rriHE SCHOOL is provided with well equipped 
laboratories for the study of Chemical Analysis, 
Assaying, Blow-piping, Mineralogy, Petrography and 
Drawing. It has also a well equipped Mechanical 
Laboratory. The Engineering Building is provided 
with modern appHances for the study of mechanical 
and electrical engineering. The Mineralogy, Geology 
and Physics Building offers the best facilities for the 
theoretical and practical study of those subjects. 
The Mining Laboratory has been remodelled at a cost 
of some $12,000, and the operations of crushing, 
cyaniding, etc., can be studied on a large scale. 

The school is prepared to make a limited number 
of mill runs on gold ores in lots of 2 to 20 tons during 
the months of September, October and November, 
and will undertake concentrating test on large lots of 
ore from December to March. 

For Calendar of the School and 
further information apply to 

The Secretary, School of Mining, 
Kingston, Ont. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



vn 



John A. Roebung's Sons Company 

MANUFACTURERS OF OF NEW YORK 



HIGHEST GRADE WIRE ROPE ELECTRICAL WIRES OF EVERY 

OF ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. DESCRIPTION. 









117-121 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



NEW YORK 



STANLEY 

LARGEST NANUFACTURERS OF SURVEYING AND DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS IN THE WORLD. MAKERS TO 
THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. 




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G. L. BERBER & SONS 

37 William Street 
BOSTON, Mass. 

Successors to BUFF & BERGER. 

SPECIAI,TIES : 
Standard Instruments and 
Appliances for 

Mining, Subway, 
Sewer, Tunnel, 



AXD ALL KINDS OF 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE Uuderground Work. 



TELESCOPE ON TOP 



TELESCOPE AT SIDE 



For vertical sighting it is also most useful and accurate, as by trans- 
terring the lines of both positions of auxiUary, two lines at right angles to 
eacn other are transferred down a shaft which, if produced, wiU intersect 
eacn other exactly under the centre of the instrument, and no allowance 
or calculation whatever has to be made to ascertain the centre. 

Price List post free. Cablegrams: "TURNSTILE, LONDON.' 

Great Turnstile, HOLBORN, LONDON, 
ENGLAND. 



GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM 

THE SHORT FAVORITE ROUTE 

BEWEEN Ottawa and Montreal 

Sunday Train Both Directions 
PULLMAN BUFF PARLOR CARS 

QUEBEC, HALIFM, PORTLAND 



Close Connections at 
Montreal with Trains for 



And all Points EAST and SOUTH. 

wxclT™ OTTAWA, NEW YORK AND BOSTON 

And all NEW ENGLAND POINTS. 

Through Buffet Sleeping Cars betweeq Ottawa and f<ew York. 

Baggage checked to all points and passed by customs in transit. 
For tickets, time tables and information, apply to nearest ticket agent of 
this company or connecting lines. 

G. T. Bell, Gen'l Pass, and Ticket Agent. 



viii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



The JOHN McDOUGALL Caledonian Iron Works Go. Limited. 



MONTREAL. 




PATENTED 

EIGHT INCH, TWO 
STAGE TURBINE. 

Belt driven from a Water Wheel 
and used for Placer Mining, 
Capacity 1,750 gallons per mi- 
nute against 170 feet head. 



We manufacture for sale and on order PUMPS and PUMPING ENGINES for liquids, air and gas ; Con- 
densers, Cooling Towers and other apparatus and machinery under all Canadian Letters & Patent owned and 
controlled by the International Steam Pump Co. and its Companies, including the following Patents, — 

47168 62005 74319 76519 77655 81034 84108 86516 89242 
52155 70612 75069 76520 79001 82040 84109 86517 
53629 73076 75359 77066 80482 82041 86288 89241 



SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL SCIENCE 

TORONTO 

Established ----- 1878 

THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 




Departments of Instruction: 

1 — Civil Engineering. 4 — Architecture. 

2 — Mining Engineering. 5 — Analytical and Applied 

3 — Mechanical and Electrical Chemistry. 

Engineering. • 6 — Chemical Engineering. 

Special attention is directed to the facilities possessed by the school 
for giving instruction in Mining Engineering. 

Laboratories: 

1 — Chemical. 3 — Milling and 4 — Steam. 6 — Electrical. 

2 — Assaying Ore Treatment 5 — Meteorological 7 — Testing. 

A Calendar giving full information, and including a list showing the 
positions held by graduates, sent on application. 

A. T, LAING, Registrar. 



CANADIAN MINING INSTITUTE 

Incorporated by Act of Parliament 1898. 

AIMS AND OBJECTS. 

(A) To promote the Arts and Sciences connected with the 
economical production of valuable minerals and metals, by 
means of meetings for the reading and discussion of technical 
papers, and the subsequent distribution of such information as 
may be gained through the medium of publications. 

(B) The establishment of a central reference library and a 
headquarters for the purpose of this organization. 

(C) To take concerted action upon such matters as afifect 
the mining and metallurgical industries of the Dominion of Canada. 

(D) To encourage and promote these industries by all law- 
ful and honourable means. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members shall be persons engaged in the direction and 
operation of mines and metallurgical works, mining engineers, 
geologists, metallurgists, or chemists, and such other persons as 
the Council may see fit to elect. 

Student Members shall include persons who are qualifying 
themselves for the profession of mining or metallurgical engineer- 
ing, students in pure and applied science in any technical school 
in the Dominion, and such other persons, up to the age of 25 
years, who shall be engaged as apprentices or assistants in mining, 
metallurgical or geological work, or who may desire to participate 
in the benefits of the meetings, library and publications of the 
Institute. Student members shall be eligible for election as 
Members ofter the age of 25 years. 

SUBSCRIPTION. 

Member's yearly, subscription $10.00 | 

Student Member's do 2.00 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Vol. 1, 1898, 66 pp.. out of print Vol. V. 1902, 700 pp., bound. 

Vol. II, 1899, 285 pp., bound red cloth Vol. VI, 1903. 520 pp., bound. 
Vol. Ill, 1900, 270 pp., bound red cloth Vol. VII, 1904,530 pp., bound. 
Vol. IV, 1901, 333 pp., bound. 

Membership in the Canadian Mining Institute is open to 
everyone interested in promoting the profession and industry of 
mining without qualification or restrictions. 

Forms of application for membership, and copies of the 
Journal of the Institute, etc., may be obtained upon application to 

H. MORTIMER-LAMB, Secretary, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



IX 



FLORY HOISTING ENGINES 

STEIAM AND EILEICTRIC 

Are designed for " STRENUOUS " duty. In Mines, Quarries, 
and the various requirements for Contractors : Pile Driving, , 
Bridge Building, and general Hoisting purposes 

The FLORY TRAMWAY and CABLEWAY SYSTEM is unequalled 

Slate Mining and 
Working Machinery. 

SALES AGENTS : 

I. MATHESON & CO., 

New Glasgow; N. S. 

W. H C. MUSSEN & CO.; 

Montreal. 

S. Flory Mfg, Go. 





ASK FOR OUR CATALOGUES. 



Office and Works: BANGOR, Pa, U.S.A. 



UNITED STATES 



STEEL PRODUCTS EXPORT CO. 



NEW YORK: Battery Park BIdg. MONTREAL! Bank of Ottawa Bidg. 

IRON AND STEEL WIRE ROPE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

wire: rope: tramwavs 

AND 



cable: HOIST-CONVEIYORS 

RUBBER AND PAPER INSULATED COPPER WIRE AND CABLES 



WRITE FOR OUR CATALOGUES 



MORRIS MACHINE WORKS 

BALDWINSVILLE, N.Y. 

Centrifugrai Pumping^ Machinery for 
Various industrial Purposes. 

We are building a special solid steel lined 
pump for handling tailings or slimes in gold 
mining. Estimates furnished upon applica- 
tion for pumping outfits for special purposes. 
Write for catalogue. 

New York office— 39-41 Cortlandt St. 
age;ncibs 

Henion & Hubbell, 61-69 North Jefferson Street, Chicago, 111. 
Harron, Rickardl& McCone, San Francisco, Cal. 2Jimmerman-"Wells-Brown Co., Portland Oregon, 

H. W. Petrie, Toronto, Ont. 




X 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Dan'l Smith 
President. 



C. E. Macpberson 
Sec.-Treas. 



For Miners 
Pit-Sinkers 



For Qoarrymen 
Contractors 



ONTARIO POWDER CO. Ltd. 

I i5 Brock Street, KINGSTON, ONT. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

DYNAMITE, EXPLOSIVES 

ELECTRIC BLASTING APPARATUS, FUSE, CAPS , &c. 

ELECTRIC BLASTING APPARATUS Adapted for Firing an kinds of 

— 'M>iii«iiinivw :explosives used in Blasting. 

Victor Electric Platinum Fuses. 

Pn.vfw"^" V \a ^P"" exploding any make of dynamite or blasting powder 

li.ach i use Folded separately and packed m neat paper boxes of 50 each. All tested 
and warranted. Single and double strength with any length of wires. 

Blasting Machines. 

The strongest and most powerful machines ever made for Electric Blasting 
Xhey are especially adapted for submarine blasting, large railroad quarrying and 
mining works. j b. 

Victor Blasting Machine 

Fires 5 to 8 holes ; weighs 15 lbs.; adapted for prospecting, etc. 

Insulated Wires and Tapes, Blasting Caps, Fuse, etc. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 
MANDPACTURED ONLT BY 

MACBETH FUZE WORKS 

Maiden Lane, New York, U.S.A. 





HAMILTON POWDER COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Explosives 

Office : 4 Hospital Street, Montreal. Branch Offices Throughout Canada. 



W. T. RODDEN, Managing Director. 



J. F. JOHNSON, Secretary-Treasurer. 



STANDARD EXPLOSIVES 



LIMIT 



Manufacturers of High Explosives, and Dealers 
in Blasting Powder, Safety Fuse Detonators, 
Batteries, Electrical Fuses, etc. 



OFFICE: 

Board of Trade Buildine:, Montreal. 



WORKS: 
lie Perrot, near Vaudreuil, P.Q. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xi 



HOW YOU CAN INCREASE 
YOUR ORE VALUES 



If your ore concentrates contain 
iron pyrites, our magnetic Separator 
will extract the iron, thus making the 
concentrates much more valuable. 
Send us a sample of your ore, and 
we will test some gratis. 

We want to send you catalog 
"H" Ask for it. 



United Iron Works 
Company — 

Sprine:field, Mo., U.S.A. 



CHROME STEELWORKS 

i V CHROME. N.J. -U.S.A. 

l_ ' troi.Mrr.n t-r niiooivL\ .s" . ^ . \-:> 



TRAJ>E 

^iTr.""^ CHROME STEEL 

SHOES AND DIES 

(hydraulic compressed) 
FOR STAMP MILLS 




CANDA SELF-LOCKING CAMS 
TAPPETS: BOSSHEADS 

CAMS SHAFTS: STAMP STEMS 




Send for Illustrated 
Pamphlet 
' Chrome Steel Stamp'' 
Mill Parts. 



GEORGE W.MYERS 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL 

For Reduction of all classes of Ore 




PATENTED \fi THE FOLLOWING COUNTRIES 

DOMINION OF CANADA 



United States 
Mexico 
New Zealand 
Japan 
Russia 



Great Britain 

South African Colonies 

Germany 

New South Wales 

Victoria 



British India 
Tasmania 
Queensland 
South Australia 
West Australia 



The Elspass Mill. 



A few reasons why the ELSPASS MILL is displacing 
all other crushers : 

Practically no slimes ; more lineal feet screen surface 
than any other mill ; less horse-power to operate than 
any other mill of the same capacity ; cost of erection 
very low ; occupies very little space ; will save your free 
coarse gold in the mill without the use of mercury ; per- 
fect panning motion, die revolving and rollers remaining 
stationary ; 30 to 60 tons of ore treated per day ; costs 
very little for repairs. 



Adopted by the U.S. Government and installed in the 
new mint at Denver. 



Liberal Di^ount to Supply Houses. 



Address for terms and particulars 



CANADA FOUNDRY CO., TORONTO 

Manufacturers for the Canadian Trade. 



THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL AND MFG. CO., 



RUEBLO. 
COLO, U.S.A. 



xii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



PUMPING MACHINERY 

FOR MINES AND WATERWORKS 




3 SETS OF GEARED THREE-THROW HORIZONTAL RAM PUMPS 

9 RAMS EACH 10 INS. DIAMETER X 20 INS. STROKE. 



Hathorn Davey 6l Co. Ltd. 



LEEDS, ENGLAND. 



Sole Canadian 
Representatives 



PEACOCK BROTHERS 



Canada Life Building 
MONTREAL. 



ROBERT MEREDITH & CO. 

57 St. Francois Xavier St., MONTREAL 

Stock Brokers. Dealers in Mining and Indus- 
trial Shares. Companies Formed and Floated. 



Private Wire Connection with 

ZIMMERMANN &. FORSHAY, New York. 



ARE YOU CONFRONTED WITH A DIF- 
FICULT ORE-SEPARATING PROBLEM? 

THE WETHERILL MAGNETIC SEPARATING PROCESS 

MAY PROVE THE SOLUTION. 

For information and for Illustrated Phamphlet, apply to 

WETHERILL SEPARATING CO., 52 Broadway, New York. 

GOLD MEDAL awarded at the WORLD'S FAIR, ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Mfg. Agents for Canada, ROBERT GARDNER ft SON, Montreal. P.Q. 



THE CANADIAN MINING MANUAL 

1 9 O -a 

Everyone connected with Mining in Canada should have a copy. 
This Manual deals with all mining affairs in Canada, and gives 
a list of all the reliable mines throughout the Dominion. 

RRICE 

THE REVIEW PUBLISHING CO. - - - 171 St. James Street, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xiii 



THE CROW'S NEST PASS COAL 
CO., LIMITED. 

OFFICES 

MANNING ARCADE, TORONTO. 
FERNIE, BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Gold Medal— Coal and Coke — Lewis & Clark Exposition 1905. 
Silver Medal — Coal and Coke — Paris Universal Exposition 1900. 

Mines and Coke Ovens at Fernie, Coal Creek Michel and 
Carbonado. 

Annual Capacity of Mines 2,000,000 tons. Coke Ovens 
500,000 tons. 



We are shipping domestic coal to points in Manitoba, Al- 
berta, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Montana, Washington 
and Idaho, a territory of over 400,000 square miles, and WE 
ARE GIVING SATISFACTION. 

We are shipping steam coal from Winnipeg to the Pacific 
Coast, and not only is it used in that vast area by the Railways 
and the largest firms, but also by the Great Northern Steamship 
Company's liners plying between Seattle and the Orient. 

Our Michel Blacksmith coal is used in Railway forging 
shops in Winnipeg, seven hundred miles East, and in Vancouver 
four hundred miles West. 

Ask a British Columbia smelter Superintendent what coke 
he uses and what coke giyes him best satisfaction. 

OUR ANALYSES SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

R. G. DRINNAN, 6. 6. S. LINDSEY, 

Superintendent. General Manager. 



LUDWIG NAUEN 

Hambupg", Germany 



CONTINENTAL AGENT AND BUYER FOR 

ASBESTOS CRUDE AND FIBRE ALL GRADES 

Actinolite, Talc, Corundum 
Mica, Molybdenite, 

AND OTHER MINERALS. 



SPRINGHILL COAL 

THE CUMBERLAND RAILWAY & COAL CO. 

Are prepared to deliver this well known 
Steam Coal at all points on the lines of 
G. T. R., C. P. R., and I. C. Railway. 

Head Office: 107 St. James St., MONTREAL 

ADDEESS, P.O. BOX 396. 



DOMINION BRIDGE CO., LTD., MONTREAL, P.Q. 

BRIDGES 



TURNTABLES, ROOF TRUSSES 
STEEL BUILDINGS 
ELECTRIC and HAND POWER CRANES 
Structural METAL WORK of all kinds 



BEAMS, CHANNELS, ANGLES, PLATES, ETCp IN STOCK 



MILLING AND MINING MACHINERY 

Shafting, Pulleys, Gea ring, Hangers, Boilers, Engines, Steam 
Pumps, Chilled Car Wheels and Car Castings. Brass and Iron 
Castings of Every Description. Light and Heavy Forgings. 



ALEX. FLECK LTD., Ottawa. 



xiv 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Directory of Mining Engineers, Cliemists, Assayers, Etc. 



JOHN E. HARDMAN 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER 



ROOM 10 



171 ST. JAMES STREET 



MONTREAL 



MILTON L. HERSEY, M.Sc. 

(McGiU) 

Consulting Chemist of the C.P.R. 

OrnciAL AssAYER Appointed for Province 
OF Quebec. 

146 St. James Street, MONTREAL 

ASSAYS OF ORES. 

Chemical and Physical Tests of all 
Materials. 

mineral properties examined. 



DR. J. T. DONALD 

(Official Analyst to the Dominion Government.) 

ANALYTICAL CHEMIST & ASSAYER 

112 St. Francois-Xavier Street 

MONTREAL. 

Analysis, Assaying, Cement Testing, 
etc. Mining Properties Examined. 

DIRECTOR OF LABORATORIES: 

R. H. D.BENN.F.cs. 

S. DILLON-MILLS, M. Ex. 

SPECIALTIES: 

Minerals of Huronian and Laurentian 
areas. 

Twenty years' exyerience superintending 
furnaces and mines. 

538 Huron Street 
TORONTO - - - - ONTARIO. 

WM. BLAKEMORE 

MINING 
ENGINEER 

Consultation. Reports. Development. 



FRITZ CIRKEL 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER. 

Twenty years' experience in Explora- 
tory Work and Mining in Germany, 
Eastern and Central Canada, British 
Columbia and the Pacific States. 

Examination of Mines. 

Office, 80 Stanley St., MONTREAL, Can. 

FRANK B. SMITH, B.Sc. 

CIVIL AND 
MINING ENGINEER 

Certificated Colliery Manager Great 
Britain and British Columbia. 

Reports on Mining Properties. 

CALGARY, ALTA. 



NELSON 



B.C. 



CHARLES BRANDEIS 

A. M. Amer. Inst E.E.— A.M. Can. Soc. C.E. 
Mem. Amer. Electro-Chemical Soc, Etc. 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

Estimates, Plans and Supervision of Hydraulic 
and Steam, Electric Light, Power and Railroad 
Plants. 

Electric equipment of Mines and Electro- 
Chemical Plants. Specifications, Reports, Val- 
uations, etc. 

Long Distance Telephone Main 3256. 
Cable Address: Brandeis-Montreal. 

W. U. Code, Univ-Edition 

62-63 Guardian Building, MONTREAL. 



H. F. E. GAMM, Mem. D.I.A.E. 

Mining Engineer. 

Gen. Manager, Ontario Mining & Smelting Co. 

Mines examined. Mills designed. 
Machinery installed. 

Specialties: Lead, Silver, Copper, Gold. 
Rare Metals Wanted. 

Bannockburn. Ont, 

Rutherford, New Jersey. 

No. 1418 Flatiron Building, N.Y. City. 



J. B. "TYRRELL 

Late of the Geological Survey of Canada. 

MINING ENGINEER 
Dawson ------ Yukon . 

Telegraphic Address — Tyrrell, Dawson. 
Code used — Bedford McNeil's. 

F. HILLE 

MINING ENGINEER 



Mines and Mineral Lands examined and 
reported on. Plans and Estimates on 
Concentrating Mills after the Krupp- 
Bilharz system. 



PORT ARTHUR, ONT. 
Canada. 



L. VOGELSTEIN & CO. 

90-96 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 
representing 

ARON HIRSCH & SOHN 
Halberstadt, Germany. 



Copper, Argentiferous and Auriferous Copper 
Ores, Mattes and Bullion, Lead, Tin, Antimony 
Spelter. 

Copper an J Brass Rolling and Tubing Mills 
in Europe. 

agents of the 

Delamar Copper Refining Works, 
Carteret, N.J. 



HANBURY A. BUDDEN 

ADVOCATE PATENT AGENT 

NEW YORK LIFE BUILDING, MONTREAL 
cable address : brevet, Montreal 



A. W. ROBINSON, M. Am. Soc. C.E., M. Am. Soc. M.E. 



Dredging Machinery. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEER 



Plant for Public Works. 



Gold Dredges. 



14 PHILLIPS SQUARE, MONTREAL, 
CANADA. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XV 




CHEAPEST 

POWER. 

60 % Saving 

in Fuel. 

Suction Gas 
Producers 
FOR Gas 
Engines. 

1 lb. of Coal per h.p. hour. Cost i to J cent per horse-power 
hour. Built for any capacity required. No boiler or Gas 
Holder required. Automatic Work. Contracts undertaken for 
complete Power Plants and results guaranteed. 

DR. OSCAR NAGLE, CHEMICAL ENGINEER 

90-96 Wall Street, NEW YORK CITY. 

HE1TE7 BATH & SOIT, Brokers. 

LONDON, LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA 

AM description METALS, MATTES, ETC. 

Warehouses. LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA. 
Warrants issued under their Special Act of Parliament. 

NITRATE OF SODA s.'j'.'^^rn'oVio,, 



OLDEST EXPERTS IN 

olybdenite, 
^ ^ Scheeiite, 

X Wolframite, 

Chrome Ore, 
'«p Nickel Ore, 

^ Cobalt Ore, 

^ X Cerium, and 




Tale, 
Mica, 
Barytes, 
Graphite, 
Blende, 
Corundum, 
Fluorspar, 
Feldspar. 



LARGEST BUYERS, 
BEST FIGURES, 
ADVANCES ON SHIPMENTS, 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED, 



Cables— Blackwell, Liverpool, ABC 
Code, Moreing- & Neal, Mining- and 
General Code, Lieber's Code and 
ler's Code. 

ESTABLISHED BY GEO. G. BLACKWELL, 1869. 



Dr. Goldschmidrs ^iS?s 

"THERMIT" Steel for Repair Work, Welding of 
Street Rails. Shafting and Machinery. 

"TITAN THERMIT" for foundry work. 

"NOVO" AIR HARDENING STEEL 

Twist Drills, MilHng Cutters, Blanks. 

High Speed and Durability. 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Sole Agent for Canada, 
334 St. James Street, Montreal. 

SADLER & HAWORTH 

TANNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Oak Leather Belting 

Hydraulic and Mechanical Leather 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 

LICENSES TO PROSPECT 

or work Minerals on any of their Lands and Reservations, covering nearly 
a quarter of a million acres in Eastern Ontario, and principally within the 
belts containing Iron, Phosphate, Gold, Galena. Plumbago, Mica 
Marble, Building Stone, and other valuable Minerals, are issued by 

The Canada Company, 



For list of lands and terms apply to 
the Company's Inspector and Agent, 



ANDREW BELL, C.E., D.L.S . Etc., ALMONTE, Ont. 



LEIDOUX 8c CO. 



99 JOHN STREET 
NEW VORK 
SAMPLE AND ASSAY ORES AND METALS 

Only two 



Independent Ore Sampling Works at the Port of New York 
such on the Atlantic seaboard. 

We are not Dealers or Refiners, but receive Consignments, Weigh, Sample 
and Assay them, selling to the highest bidders, obtaining adyances when 
desired, and the buyers of two continents pay the highest market price, in 
New York Funds, cash against our certificates. 

Mines Examined and Sampled. Also Analyse everything. 



THE COBALT SILVER DISTRICT 

LANDS, MINES AND 
STOCK FOR SALE 

The Coleman Development Co., Ltd. 

(No Personal Liability) H alley bury, P.O. 



NICKEL 

TTHE CANADIAN COPPER COMPANY. 

NICKEL FOR NICKEL STEEL 

XHE ORFORD COPPER COMPANY. 



WRITE US FOR PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices: 43 Exchangee Place, NEW YORK. 



xvi 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




Upper Terminal, Alice Tramway. 



Patent Automatic Aerial Tramway 

(RIBLET SYSTEM) 

With this system 

ONE MAN can handle 1600 TONS 

. per day. 

COST OF OPERATION : ONE MAN'S WAGES. 
More Riblet Tramways built last year than all others combined. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES AND SPECIFICATIONS. 

RIBLET TRAMWAY CO. 

SPOKANE, WASH., U S.A. NELSON, B.C., CANADA 



the: 



BENNETT FUSE 



CROWN 




BRAND 



Manufactured by 



WILLIAM BENNETT, SONS & CO. 

Camborne, Cornwall, 
England 



CANADIAN OFFICE: 

BENNETT FUSE CO., YATES ST., 

VICTORIA, B.C. 

AND AGENCIES 
THROUGHOUT 
THE DOMINION 




CORRUC/\TED 

METALLIC 

PACKING 

for joints of any 
Size or Shape 

Newton & 
Nicholson 

TVNE DOCK 

CORRUGATED 

METALLIC 

PACKING 

WORKS; 

South 
Shields, 

ENGLAND. 

Telegraqhic 
Address : 

"CORRUGATE," 
Tyne Dock. 



Wanied 10 Purchase 

Persons having copies for sale of Volume I 
of the Proceedings of the Federated Canadian 
Mining Institute, and of Vols. I, II, III and 
IV of the Proceedings of the Canadian Min- 
ing Institute, will confer a favor by com- 
municating with the Secretary, 

877 Dorchester Street, 

MONTREAL. 



Announcement 

For the greater convenience of our patrons in Ontario and Manitoba we 
have opened a Sales Office at 12 Lawlor*Building, Corner King and Yonge 
Streets, Toronto, Mr. W. G. Chater, Representative. 

11 Correspondents in Ontario and Manitoba are requested to address them- 
selves there and are cordially invited to call when in Toronto. 

The Jenckes Machine Co., Limited. 



TORONTO 
HALIFAX 



HEAD OFFICE: SHERBROOKE, QUE. 
vunRi«- SHERBROOKE, QUE. 
WQKKS. CATHARINES, ONT. 



ROSSLAND 
VANCOUVER 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xvii 



Rock 
Drills 

receive more severe usage and less care 
than any other class of mining ma- 
chinery. 

Sullivan Drills are built with a know- 
ledge of the fact gained through an ex- 
perience of 40 years in the making and 
use of rock cutting machinery. The 
design of all details, the choice of 
materials, the searching tests at each 
stage in manufacture, and the care used 
in assembling the finished parts, all 
have a common object, to make the 
driir unbreakable. 

As a result, Sullivan Drills cost less 
for repairs than any other under similar 
conditions of service. 

Catalogue 51. 



Air 

Compressors 




The Sullivan Straight Line Two 
Stage Compressor, Class WB-2, shown 
above, is especially suited to mining 
conditions and operation at a distance 
from the repair shop. 

All parts are made with ample bear- 
ing surfaces, to reduce wear, and are of 
the best materials obtainable. Inlet 
air valves on both cylinders are of the 
Corliss type, and removable automatic 
poppet valves control the air discharge. 
The intercooling is veryt horough, the 
air meeting the cold tubes three separ- 
ate times. Air supply comes from out 
of doors, not from engine room. Built 
in capacities up to 30 drills. 

Bulletin 53-A. 



DIAMOND CORE DRILLS 
COAL CUTTERS 
HOISTING PLANTS 



Sullivan Machinery Co 



CLAREMONT, N. H. 
NEW YORK 
PITTSBURG 
KNOXVILLE 



ST. LOUIS 
JOPLIN, MO. 
DENVER 
BUTTE 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



EL PASO 
SALT LAKE 
PARIS, FRANCE 
JOHANNESBURG 



SPOKANE 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ROSSLAND 

MEXICO 



XVll) 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW 




X 

c 

f 

^5 



D 

M 
O 




JEFFREY 10 TON SINGLE END CONTROL ELECTRIC 
LOCOMOTIVES IN OPERATION AT PITTSBURGH 
GAS COAL COMPANY'S MINE. ISELIN, PA. 

JEFFREY LOCOMOTIVES HAUL THE WORLD'S COAL. 



Catalogues free- 



The Jeffrey Manufacturing Company 



NEW YORK. 
PITTSBURGH. 



COLUMBUS, Ohio, U.S.A. 

CHICAGO. KNOXVILLE, Tenn. 

DENVER. CHARLSTON, W. Va, 

Canadian Agents : 

A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., TORONTO 
WILLIAMS & WILSON, - - MONTREAL 




THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XIX 



A FINE STEAM PLANT 




"I will say without qualification that it is as fine a boiler and 
engine plant as I have ever had the pleasure of seeing for its 
size. The engine was working without heating, and absolutely 
without any noise. I wish to congratulate you on your success 
in building this class of engine, and hope that we may have 
pleasure in dealing with you again." 

The above refers to a 350 horse power Robb-Armstrong Corliss 
Engine and two 175 horse power Robb-Mumford Boilers in- 
stalled by us. 



ROBB ENGINEERING CO., Ltd., amherst, n.s. 

AGEIISITS 

WILLIAM McKAY, 320 Ossington Avenue, Toronto. 

WAT>»o:v JACK dc COMPANY, Bell Telephone Building, Montreal. 

J. F. POKT£K, 355 Carlton Street, Winnipeg. 



XX 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




RAND HIGH PRESSURE AIR COMPRESSOR. 

DUPLEX STEAM CYLINDERS. FODR STAGE AIR CYLINDERS. 

Built for charging Pneumatic Locomotives, etc., and designed for Terminal Air Pressures 
of 800 to 1000 lbs. per square inch. 



We are prepared to submit specifications and estimates, covering complete Air 
Haulage Systems, including Compressors, Locomotives, Pipe Lines, Charging Stations. 



Correspondence solicited. 



Eastern Branches 



TORONTO.ONT 
HALIFAX.N.S. 
STJOHNS.NM 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

MONTREAL 

WORKS QUE. 
SHERBROOKE.QUE. t-*" 



Western Branches 



ROSSLAND.B.C. 
VANCOUVER.BC. 
RATPORTAGE.ONT 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xxi 



ALLlS^ALMERS-BULLOCK 

L.I M ITEID 




GATES "K" ROCK AND ORE BREAKER 

To reduce rock for finer crushing or pulverizing by stamps, rolls or Huntington mills; for fluxing purposes in smelting plants; 
for'railway ballast and the production of cement and concrete the Gates "K" Gyratory Breaker is unequalled. It is the only 
machine built so as to be driven at right angles to the discharge opening, as here shown. This permits of a very compact arrange- 
ment of a plant, enables more than one breaker to discharge into the same elevator, and does away with expensive transmission 
machinery. See Catalogue 110. 

ELECTRIC A ND MIN ING PLANTS 
WORKS MONTREAL 

Branch Offices : : : Halifax, Toronto, Winnipeg, Nelson, Vancouver. 



xxii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



PROSPECTING PIANTS. 

3 Stamp Mills; Cyanide Plants; Huntington Mills, etc., 
can be supplied in sections of a very low weight limit 
for transportation by man, dog-team or canoe. 

COMPRESSORS & BLOWING ENGINES. 

Fraser & Chalmers, Ltd., make a specialty of Compressor 
and Blowing Engines of the very largest capacity, with 
the Gutermuth Patent Valves. 

WINDING ENGINES FOR DEEP MINES. 

« The best Winding Engines working on the deepest Mines 
in South Africa are those built by Fraser & Chalmers, Ltd. 

FimSEII & 




Limited, of England. 

• Catalogues and quotations free from 

W. STANLEY LECKY ROCHUSSEN & GOLDS 



P.O. Box 622, Montreal. 



Yates St., Victoria, B.C. 



Assayers' Supplies 

CHEMICAL 

APPARATUS 



E 

Piospectors' Outfits Fine diemicals 
Miners' Outfits ki^ Cliemicals 

Correspondence invited. Prompt Deliveries. 

The Chemist & Surgeons 
Supply Co. Ltd. 




32 McGill College Avenue, 
MONTREAL. 



CHEMICAL AND 
ASSAY APPARATUS 

ZINC, CYANIDE and SULPHURIC 
ACID for CYANIDE PROCESS 

Complete Assay Outfits 

The Hamilton-Merrit Prospector's Outfits 
Becker's Balances and Weights Battersea Crucibles and Muff 
Hoskins' Gasoline Furnaces Kavaller's Bohemian Glassware 

Munktell's Swedish Filters 

LYMAN, SONS & COMPANY 

Our Catalogue on Application 
380, 382. 384 & 386 ST. PAUL STREET, MONTREAL. 





t t 



ACME Brand." 



The B. Greening 

HAMILTON, Ont. 



Highest grade of hoisting rope made. 

Extra tensile strength for hea\y work. 

One strand painted green, look for it. 
Us« Greening's Rope Grease for lubrication. 

Wire Co., Limited 

MONTREAL, Que. 




STEAM 

BOILERS 

Horizontal, Upright, Portable, Loco- 
motive, Return Tube, Tubular, 
Smoke Stacks, Stand Pipes, Water 
Towers, Rivetted Steel Plate work 
of every description. 

CANADA FOUISIDRV COMRANY, LIMITED. 



Head Office and Works: 
TORONTO, Ont. 



District Offices — Montreal, 
Winnipeg, Vancouver, 



Halifax, 
Rossland, 



Ottawa, 
Calgary. 



24th YEAR OF PUBLICATION 




THE OLDEST AND ONLY OFFICIAL MINING JOURNAL PUBLISHED IN CANADA, 



Edited by H. MORTIMER-LAMB. 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 



Editorial Office: 171 St. James St., MONTREAL. 

m Wellingtoft ^,-OTTAWfr. 



VOL. XXVI— No. 2. 



MONTREAL, FEBRUARY, 1906. 



$2.00 per year 
20 cents per copy 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Published by THE REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
Limited, P.O. Box 2187, Montreal, Canada. 

Address all communications as above. 

Subscription, payable in advance, $3.00 per year, including 
postage. 

The REVIEW'S columns are always open for the discussion 
of questions cognate to the mining industry. 

Advertising copy musl-reach the REVIEW OFFICE not 
later than the 25th of the monln preceding publication 
'v*^ to secure insertion in next j^astfe. 

Advertising rates on application. 



CONTENTS. 

Page. 

Editorial Comment 

Editorials: — 

The Tariff Commission and the Iron Industry 44 

The U. S. Geological Survey and the State Mining Bureaus. .. . 45 

The Need of a Federal Department of Mines 46 

The Centre Star Amalgamation 47 

The Copper Situation 47 

Papers: — 

The Calcite Vein 48 

Note on a New Instrument for Surveying Deep Bore Holes 48 

The West Gore Antimony Deposits 60 

Mining in Quebec, 1905 51 

The Bearing of Engineering on Mining 58 

Tactics at the LeRoi_ Meeting 60 

Keport of the Mining Committee, Halifax Board of Trade 61 

A Bank Manager on Mining in Canada 62 

Ontario Mining Intelligence 62 

Coal Notes *63 

Reports and Meetings 64 

Mining Notes 64 

Mining Men and Affairs 66 

Company Notes 66 

Nova Scotia Mining Intelligence 67 

Mining Share Market 67 

Industrial Notes 68 

Mining and Metallurgical Patents 68 



A correspondent writing to the Engineering and 
Mining Journal on "The Ownership of Experiences," 
raises a question with which every engineer at some 
time in his career is confronted, namely: Whether 
the data acquired during the course of an extensive 
engineering practice, or during one phase thereof, is 



the property of the engineer, or of the client employ- 
ing him. Some courts (in the U.S.) have held that 
processes or inventions developed by men when in 
the employ of a corporation or employer are the 
property of that corporation or employer, but the 
letter referred to takes the ground, we think rightly, 
that data accumulated in engineering practice are the 
property of the engineer, and should remain so. 



Our readers may remember that attempts at gold 
dredging on the Saskatchewan River have been, from 
time to time, made during the past ten years. All 
have been more or less directly the effort of one Dr. 
Roughsedge, a veterinary surgeon from Edmonton. 
After exhausting the willingness and resources of 
credulous investors in Ottawa, Montreal and other 
parts of Canada, this gentleman, some two years ago, 
turned his efforts towards the United States, and now 
publishes the fact that he has prevailed to the extent 
of being in a position to put on the river a dredge of 
"4000 tons" (sic.) capacity, costing $57,000.00. The 
ability to make a satisfactory dividend from the 10c. 
dirt which, according to best authorities, is about the 
average contents of the property, is a matter ..ajient 
which Dr. Roughsedge is discretely silent. 



Even in a country where journalistic enterprise is 
taken as a matter of course, the extraordinary useful 
work of our New York contem.porary, the Engineering 
and Mining /owrwaZ commands attention. We would, 
however, specially commend the annual review number 
of January 6th, which contains, in a series of most 
readable articles, a comprehensive summary of mining 
operations throughout the world for the past year. 
The labour in getting together and compiling this in- 
formation must necessarily have been stupendous. 
Much space, we note, has been given to re- 
viewing our Canadian industry, Mr. E. Jacobs con- 
tributing an interesting article on British Columbia, 
while Mr. T. W. Gibson and Mr. Dwight E. Woodbridge 
write on Ontario conditions. In a degree, the enter- 
prise displayed by our Canadian press, especially in 
the west, is no less commendable. Thus the exhaus- 
tive review of British Columbia mining in 1905, 



42 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



published in the Nelson Daily News on the first of the 
year was a quite remai'kable achievement, and the 
same may be said of the Holiday Number of the 
Phoenix Pioneer, which is printed in magazine form, 
is most profusely illustrated, and contains some sixty 
pages devoted to a well-written description of the 
mineral resources and progress of the Boiuidarj' Creek 
district. 



The Hon. J. Prevost, Minister of Colonization, 
Mines and Fisheries, in the Quebec Government, is 
contemplating a visit of inspection to the new Chibo- 
gamon district next summer in company with a quali- 
fied mining engineer, who will be specially engaged 
for the purpose. Mr. Prevost's object in undertaking 
this somewhat arduous journey is, we understand, to 
acquaint himself at first hand with the resources of 
the district and so place himself in a better position 
to form an opinion in regard to the steps that should 
be taken by the Government in assisting in the devel- 
opment of the region. The Province is to be congra- 
tulated in having as a Minister of Mines, a gentleman 
who takes so keen and personal an interest in the devel- 
opment of an industry, which is yet likely to occupy 
the first place in point of importance among the in- 
dustries of Quebec. Before, however, that consum- 
mation is reached it is imperative that the present 
mining law should be repealed in favour of a measure 
that will better encourage individual effort and render 
difficult the present system of wholesale speculative 
blanketing of areas, so common. This, we believe, 
Mr. Prevost realizes. Meanwhile the interest that 
has recently been shown* in the exploitation of new 
undeveloped mining regions is indicated by the fact 
that while for the fiscal year ending June 30th last, 
the revenue from the issuance of licenses was but 
approximately $3,000, already during the six months 
the income derivable from this source has increased to 
over $30,000. 



The question of permitting the importation of Ca- 
nadian zinc ores into the United States under the pre- 
vious tariff ruling of the Treasury Department at 
Washington, which was distinctly advantageous to 
exporters, is again being raised, and a bill is about to 
be introduced into congress, providing that in future 
all zinc-bearing ores imported into the United States 
shall be subject to a duty of one cent per pound on 
the zinc contents. The definition of zinc-bearing 
ores, is stated as all ores, whether crude, concentrated 
or otherwise which contain zinc in any form or con- 
dition, either free or in combination, and in which zinc 
is more valuable than any other single component, 
irrespective of whether such ores are lead-bearing 
ores, or not. In discussing this bill, the Mining Re- 
porter, ( Denver, Col. ) very truly remarks that 
to shut out Canadian zinc will undoubtedly cause 
this coimtry to increase the production of its 
own metal, which will then be used, to the exclusion 
f)f over fifteen hundred tons now supplied annually by 
the United States. To pass the bill will temporarily 
benefit the producer of the ore and injure the smelter, 
and this period must then be followed by one of re- 
construction, in which the various interests must ef- 
fect a readjustment. On the whole, we question whether 
with improved home facilities for the treatment of zinc 
ores and the improved opportunities afforded for 
marketing the product in liurope, that the loss of the 
American market would be so serious to Caiuidian 
producers as at first glance miglif apj)ear to be the case. 



The hodge-podge of ideas respecting an economical 
and feasible process for obtaining satisfactory values 
from the silver-cobalt-nickel-arsenic ores of Temis- 
caming is adequately reflected in the numerous ridi- 
culous paragraphs which are now going the rounds 
of the press. A majority of the producing mines are 
understood to have entered into a 5 years agreement 
with each other as to the disposition of their ores and 
to have decided to, themselves, solve the metallur- 
gical problem by employing a chemist to experiment 
with the ores. 

That, however, this combination is not entirely 
confident of its resources and abilities is indicated 
by a recent paragraph to the effect that it is also in- 
tends to ask the Ontario Government for a money 
grant towards defraying the cost of the proposed 
smelter. One wonders what has become of the offers 
to treat these ores which have been made by repre- 
sentatives of German houses, by metallurgists like 
Mr. Kirkgaarde, and by Lieut. Van der Osten! And 
one also worTders why the opulent owners of the.se 
mines desire to share their profits and knowledge 
with the Ontario Government ? 

The mines of Coleman Township are both unique 
and valuable; but they are not, and will not be. exempt 
from the conditions which govern mining and metal- 
lurgical enterprises all over the world. No one can 
give the seller 100% of what he buys and have any 
margin for profit. We trust we may be in error, but 
the project seems to have elements of weakness which 
will require both time and money to overcome. A 
market for silver is always available, that for nickel 
usually, but the market for cobalt in large quantities 
has yet to be created. 



Dividends in the Rand (S.A.) for 1905 amounted 
to the very satisfactory figures of $24,250,000 (£4,849,- 
582). The year of 1905 was an eventful one in the 
history of mining in South Africa. It was marked hy 
the production of a new record in the gold fields, the 
total of the Transvaal reaching the figures of between 
$101,000,000 and $102,000,000, an increase of over 
$23,000,000, while Rhodesia showed an increase of 
about $3,000,000. It also showed that the solution 
of the labor difficulty, by the introduction of coolies, 
was effective; whether satisfactory or not (in a politi- 
cal sense) seems yet to be a matter of doubt. 

During 1905 several new metallurgical methods or 
devices were introduced into the practice of the Gold 
Fields, the principal of which was the fine grinding or 
comminution of the ore; that tube mills will be the 
permanent practice is very doubtful, owing to the 
small capacity of the machinery, requiring a large 
number to deal with the huge quantity of material. 
The year was also noteworthy from the fact that it 
signalized the recognition of the economy of consolida- 
tion of properties, and man}^ independent properties 
were benefitted thereby. There were slight reductions 
on milling costs, but no sensible diminishing of mining 
costs. 

The reduction of milling costs has led to a generally 
lower grade of ore being milled at a profit; this result 
is not only due to reductions in the cost of the various 
parts of milling and cyanide practice but also to the 
large tonnage treated per stamp head. 

Finally, the year was marked by what is called the 
beginning of the "base metal" industry, i.e., the open- 
ing and development of tin mining in Vlaklaagtz, 
and Enkeldoorn, and of copper mines in the northern 
Transvaal. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



43 



A correspondent writes: "I have been looking in- 
to the laws of the different Provinces in Canada, 
with respect to Mine Managers' Certificates, and I find, 
in general, that no Province has any provision for 
shortening the time of underground experience 
in favor of men educated in mining schools. It is of 
course necessary for the mine manager to have con- 
siderable underground experience before he is given 
even a second-class certificate, and still more be- 
fore he is given a first-class certificate, authorizing 
him to have full charge of a mine. It is, however, 
perfectly obvious to any one that educated men, 
and particularly men educated in mining, can secure 
the necessary experience and information in a far 
less time than men with little or no schooling, 
and the law governing certificates should take 
account of this fact. As matters now stand, the 
law virtually discriminates against educated men in 
collieries, because the time spent at mining schools 
counts for nothing on the certificate, while even 
unintelligent labor is given full value. It seems to 
me that the British act (Coal Mines Regulation, 1887, 
Amendment 1903), is reasonable. It requires 5 years 
undergruond work for ordinary men but exempts gra- 
duates of special classes of mining schools, from 2 of 
the 5 years work. " 

Our correspondent's contention is, we think, well 
taken, in view, especially of the fact that graduates 
from mining schools in this country at least, frequently 
have spent a portion of their time while studying for 
their degree in acquiring practical experience. It 
should therefore be only necessary to call the attention 
of the proper authorities to the alleged injustice in 
order to have the matter set right. 



We are indebted to the Editor of the Mining and 
Scientific Press for an advance proof of a leading 
article shortly to be published discussing the California 
State Mining Bureau, in which the delay in appointing 
a State Mineralogist, attributable to political intrigue, 
is compared with the present anomalous condition 
of affairs in connection with the Canadian Geological 
Survey. Our contemporary remarks that when " Dr. 
George M. Dawson died, Dr. Robert Bell succeeded 
temporarily to the duties of director. This happened 
five years ago, but Dr. Bell remains 'acting director.' 
A grave injustice has been done to him and to the 
Survey. The energies of the chief and of his sub- 
ordinates have been weakened by the cliques formed 
to support one or other candidate for the position, the 
actual director has had his authority undermined by 
the uncertainty of his tenure of office and the Survey 
as a body has lacked the solidarity belonging to an 
organization having its properly appointed head. In 
other words, it is a mistake, either at Ottawa or at 
Sacramento, to sacrifice work of great usefulness to 
the exigencies of a political lobby." While this refer- 
ence is not strictly accurate in point of fact, and there- 
fore the parallel drawn is scarcely allowable, still it 
is undoubtedly true that neither Dr. Bell nor the Sur- 
vey has been justly treated by the delay on the part of 
the authorities in appointing a successor to Dr. Dawson 
as director of the department. Dr. Bell was either 
competent to undertake the duties or he was not. If 
he was, why has he had the responsibility without the 
honour and the salary to which as director he would 
have been entitled; if he was not a fit person, why 
has "he been permitted to administer the affairs of the 
department for five years? We still maintain that 
there is need for re-organization and reform in the 



maimer in which the Survey has been conducted in 
the past, and this may quite well be said \\ithout in 
any sense reflecting on the useful character of much 
of the work that has been done in recent years. We 
have therefore made no secret of our opinion that the 
task of re-organization, when it is commenced, should 
be entrusted to a young and energetic man, having 
special executive and administrative qualifications. 
But that view may be held without prejudicing one's 
sense of common fairness. Dr. Bell has grown old in 
the public service and his long record is one of which 
he has eveiy reason to be proud. It is but just that 
his claims should be regarded, and this surely might 
be done without injury to the public interests. 



The Tariff Commission which has been collecting 
evidence throughout the Dominion during the last 
few months with a view to possible tariff changes 
held a session at Sydney, C.B. on Friday, the 
r2th of January. It had been expected, in view 
of the somewhat strenuous and rabid utterances 
of members of the "Free Coal League" and 
its Halifax organ, that the session would have 
been largely attended, and that views of a widely 
divergent nature would have been expressed, but as 
a matter of fact little interest was actually shown. 
The Dominion Coal Co., through its chief sales agent, 
Mr. Alex Dick, and the Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co. 
Ltd., through Mr. Harvey Graham, were the only coal 
companies to present an argument. Mr. John Moffat, 
the Secy, of the Provincial Workingmen's Association 
appeared on behalf of the coal miners of the Province, 
but it is noteworthy that none of the Pictou or Cum- 
berland county mines thought it desirable to be 
represented. The argument for the maintenance of 
the present import duty was presented by Mr. Harvey 
Graham, who gave, briefly, a resume of the coal pro- 
duction of N.S. for 1904, from which it appears that 
the total output for the year was 5,247,135 tons, of 
which 4,544,609 tons were marketed, and 702,526 tons 
were consumed by the collieries and workmen. The 
total number of persons employed was 11,650; the 
total royalty paid to the Nova Scotia Government 
was $515,543.00. Of the total sales nearly one half 
(or 1,731,000 tons) were made to customers in the 
Province of Quebec. Competition with both Ame- 
rican and English coal had been keen at all St. Law- 
rence River ports; and it was pointed out that if this 
market was lost through removal of the import duty 
the present production would be cut in half, with 
corresponding distress to the coal towns in Nova Scotia. 

Perhaps the most significant portion of Mr. Grahams' 
remarks was the statement that the efforts to find a 
foreign market in Europe, South America and the 
West Indies had been a failure with the exception of 
a partial success in Scandinavia. A strong case 
was also made out against the removal of the duty 
on anthracite culm or dust, which, in Ontario and 
western Quebec, is now being quite largely used for 
steam purposes. 

Mr. Dick made the point that it would be diflJicult, 
or impossible, to check imports of coal intended ex- 
clusively for use in the manufacture of coke ; that such 
coal could, and would be, also used for generating 
steam or power; that it would be impossible to prevent 
the distribution of coal, once it was imported free of 
duty. 

Mr. Moffat confined himself to the reading of a re- 
solution of his Grand Council, in which the P.W.A. 
put itself on record as opposed to any alteration of 



44 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



the duty on soft coal, and is in favour of establishing 
a dut}' against the importation of anthracite dust. 
It would seem, meanwhile, that the present duties 
will, ill all probal)ility, remain in force. 



It is satisfactory to learn that a very interesting 
programme has been prepared for the annual meeting 
of the Canadian Mining Institute next month. In all^ 
some forty papers have been promised, many of which, 
dealing as they do with recent important mining and 
metallurgical developments in Canada, have a special 
value on this account. Thus, in addition to a lecture to 
be delivered by Mr. J. E. Hard man on the new Chibo- 
gamon region, Mr. A. P. Low, of the Geological 
Survey, Mr. J. Obalski, Inspector of Mines for the Pro- 
vince of Quebec, and Mr. Armand Muscovici, are con- 
tributing papers on the mineral resources of this new 
and promising area. Prof. W. G. Miller, Provincial 
Geologist of Ontario has kindly consented to lecture 
on Cobalt, while another new quarry district, that of 
Windy Arm, in the Yukon, will be described by Mr. 
R. G. McConnell. Among the contributions on metal- 
lurgical matters, may be mentioned an interesting ac- 
count by Mr. R. R. Hedley, manager of the Hall 
Mining and Smelting Company's smelter at Nelson, of 
a new matte separator recently installed and now in 
successful use at these works; notes on stamp mill 
practice by Mr. Courtenay De Kalb; a paper by Mr. 
J. W. Evans, on some experiments in electric smelting 
of titaniferous iron ores of Hastings County, Ont. ; 
and a contribution by Mr. H. E. T. Houltain of the 
Canada Corundum Company, on " Some phases of 
Concentration". The subject matter of this paper, 
we understand, refers to the method of operation 
as being greater than the importance of special 
design, which is the keynote of the present direction 
of progress in the west. Of late some interesting 
developments have taken place in connection with 
iron mining at Torbrook, N.S., and these will be 
described in a paper to be contributed by Mr. 
W. R. Parsons, manager of the Londonderry 
company; and, in view of the attention that is 
•now being directed to the exploitation of British Co- 
lumbia's iron resources, Mr. W. Blakemore's paper, 
on the possibility of steel manufacture in that Pro- 
vince should be most timely. Two papers, having 
for their text, the need for the revision of mining law 
in, respectively, Ontario and the Yukon are being pre- 
pared by Mr. J. M. Clark, K. C. of Toronto and Mr. J. 
B. Tyrrell, of Dawson. The Secretary, Mr. H. Mor- 
timer Lamb, in his paper, calls attention to the pre- 
sent necessity for the establishment of a Federal De- 
partment of mines, in the hope that the Institute, if 
his views are endorsed, will take official action in 
bringing to the notice of the Government the claims 
of the mining industry for recognition in this regard. 
Altogether the meeting promises to be a most successful 
one, and it is to be hoped that a large attendance may 
be depended on. 



THE TARIFF COMMISSION AND THE IRON 
INDUSTRY. 

One of the most important, and, to the mining 
industry, the most interesting of the sessions of the 
Tai-iff (Commission was held the last week in .January 
in different towns in Nova Scotia,. The interesting 
and important part of the sessions was the fact that 
they r(>]at(!d to the contimiancc! of the present duties 



on coal and iron, a majority of the producers asking 
that the duty, (or its equivalent the bounty) on 
iron, both in the metalHc state and in ores, should be 
uicreased. As the matter, perhaps, is one of special 
importance to a large number of our readers, we sum- 
marize the essential parts of the various arguments. 

The plea for assistance to the iron ore producer as 
distinct from the assistance given to the iron master 
was presented to the Commission in the form of a 
pamjihlet containing the list of the various arguments 
previously printed in the Halifax Morning Chronicle, 
and this plea was supported by a verbar address by 
Prof. J. E. Woodman, of Dalhousie College, Nova 
Scotia, who claimed to speak on behalf of a special 
committee of the Mining Society of Nova Scotia. 
The Chronicle's plea was as follows:— That, whatever 
the intentions of the promoters of the iron and steel 
industries of Nova Scotia have been, the public of 
the province expected that the large deposits of iron 
ore in that province would be developed and utilized 
to the benefit of the province at large; that expecta- 
tion had not been realized by reason of the fact that 
the metallurgical plants drew the larger portion of 
their ore supplies from foreign sources; this importa- 
tion of cheap foreign ores suffocated the feeble iron 
mining industry of the province. The point was 
made that the various iron and steel plants of the 
province did not consume 5,000 tons of native Nova 
Scotian iron ore in the course of a year ; that the output 
of iron ore had dropped from 75,000 tons in 1892 to 
12,000 tons in 190.3; that but for the exception of the 
consumption of native ore utilized by the London- 
derry Iron & Mining Company, the iron mining indus- 
try of Nova Scotia would" be practically extinct; 
that the remedy for this was not the imposition of a 
duty on foreign ores, but the taxing of the public to 
place a bounty on all native ore produced; that this 
bounty should be paid directly to the iron miner; 
that the iron master is adequately protected; that 
the iron miner has no protection. The amount asked 
for was the sum of 50 cents a ton on ore having 50% 
of metallic iron. 

The argument of the Chronicle is to the effect that, 
the introduction of Newfoundland ore in place of 
Nova Scotia ore was not due to the lack of excellence 
in the native ore, but solely to the selfishness of the 
Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., who, as the owner 
of the large deposits at Bell Isle, went into business 
as miners of ore for foreign markets and were able 
to supply the Ferrona and Sydney furnaces with 
cheaper iron ore than the Nova Scotia mines could 
give. A table which we extract shows the rapid 
growth of the iron ore trade from the Bell Isle mines 
and the very erratic production from the Mainland 
mines of Nova Scotia: 

PRODUCTION OF IRON ORE. 
(Tons. 2,240 lbs.) 

In In 
Nova Scotia Newf'dland 

Year Jons Tons 

1894 (7) 83,512 (nil) 

1895 79^636 (8) 7-50 

1896 65,932 38,450 

1897 44,146 *.58,940 

1898 31,050 *102,000 

1899 16,169 *306,880 

1900 15^507 *317,216 

1901 15,200 738,206 

1902 15^214 728,721 

1903 11,9.52 .588,795 

1904 . 49,619 589,739 

*At the Bell Island Mines of Nova Scotia Steel Co. and Domin- 
ion Iron and Steel Co. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



45 



In the argument several interesting facts appear 
which may be worth noting. The chief of these is; 
that in 1904 the steel companies of Nova Scotia re- 
ceived in national bounties sums amounting to $600- 
000.00; that the pay-rolls for the mines on Bell Isle 
amount to about $300,000.00 per anuiuu; the ad- 
mission that foreign iron ores cannot be ta.xed at pre- 
sent for the reason that too great a storm would be 
created by the iron smelting companies now in ex- 
istence; and therefore, that the most feasible method 
of robbing the people for the benefit of the iron in- 
dustry, is to pay a bounty to the iron miner on every 
ton of ore smelted by a Dominion iron works. 

Prof. Woodman, in his address supporting the claims 
of the Chronicle's pamphlet, illuminated the situation 
somewhat by acknowledging that the development 
of the iron ore production of Nova Scotia was hindered 
by two diflficulties, the first one being that the ore 
bodies themselves were too scattered, or not sufficiently 
concentrated, to make economic mining possible; 

' and secondly, that the value of the iron ores of Nova 
Scotia was less than that of the ores of the Lake Su- 
perior region, or other ore, sthat were imported by 
the smelting companies, c[ualifying this statement 
by an opinion of his own, that this second reason was 
not equivalent to saying that their values would not 
make them non-useful hy the iron master. In other 
words, his plea was for the use of an inferior ore by 
the iron master. Such inferiority, one can imagine, 
is proposed to be met by the Government bovmty on 
the ore mined, the gist of the arguments, both b>' 
the Chronicle and Prof. Woodman, being that, if an 
individual owned iron ore land, it should pay the 
(iovernment to give such individual such assistance 
in shape of bounty that he -could afford to self his ore 
to a smelter at a sufficiently low price to enable the 
smelter to use it profitably in competition with better 
ores obtained from a foreign sovirce. The statement 
which has been current for two or three years in the 
Eastern press, and which is backed up by the men who 
know best what they are talking about — such as Mr. 
Graham Eraser and Mr. Thos. Cantley — namely, that 
the search for iron ores in Nova Scotia has revealed 
no bodies which were worth utilizing economically, 
is repeated by the Professor, and, of course, is erro- 
neous when considering the extremely valuable me- 
tallurgical work and practice which has been Initiated 
and is now being carried on successfully by the Lon- 
donderry Iron & Mining Company at Torbrook and 
East mountain ores. In reply to questions by the 
Hon. The Minister of Finance, Professor Woodman 
admitted that the benefit of the bounty on pig iron 
was felt by the iron miner, but only indirectly. When 
it was suggested that the Government of Nova Scotia 

'should follow the practice of the Ontario Government 
and give a bounty out of the local treasury, his reply 
was, that the Province was appealing for federal as- 
sistance, and not for provincial, and the gist of the 
whole argument was clearly apprehended by the Hon. 
Mr. Fielding in his statement that any bounty granted 
upon iron ore would have to be sufficient to make 
the iron master take the native ore in preference to 
the imported ore from Newfoundland. 

At the Truro session, on January 27th, a logical 
plea for an increase of the duty on imported pig iron 
and for the continuance of the bounty on pig iron 
manufactured from native ores in Canada, was made 
by Mr. Thos. J. Drummond, President of the London- 
derry Iron & Mining Company. Mr. Drummond 
showed that prior to 1897 the duty on imported pig 
iron was $4.00 per ton; that by subsequent legislation 
it had been first reduced to $2.50, which, by the 



British preference of 33|%, had been further re- 
duced to $1.67. The bounty on pig iron previous 
to 1897 had been $2.00 per ton, so that in the years 
prior to '97 the duty and the bounty together gave 
aid to the industry to the extent of $6.00 per ton. 
Subsequent to 1897 the bounty was increased to $3.00 
per ton for one year, the bounty for subsequent years 
to be on a diminishing scale, so that all bounty would 
be removed by the end of the 10th year leaving only 
the import duty of $1.67 on pig iron. Mr. Drummond 
asked that a bounty of $2.00 per ton should be paid 
for a period of 5 years, and that the duty on imported 
pig iron should be increased to such an extent, as 
to give protection equivalent to $2.50 per ton, regard- 
less of preference duties, so that for the next 5 years 
the industry might be sure of a total encouragement 
of $4.50 per net ton. Mr. Drummond made clear 
one point in favour of the Ontario furnaces, by show- 
ing that foreign pig could be lirought to the ports of 
the Maritime provinces at rates which would enable it 
to compete very strongly witn the product? of the 
Nova Scotia furnaces, but that when such imported 
pig iron had also to pay rail freights, in addition to 
the water freights, the price for such iron was ma- 
terially increased, and hence it caused less competition 
with the iron produced by the furnaces in Ontario. 

Mr. B. F. Pearson, speaking on the subject of " Aid 
to the iron industry" generally, made a plea for great- 
er consideration to the proposal to give a bounty to 
makers of iron from native ore, native fuel and native 
fluxes. Mr. Pearson estimated that, of the cost of 
mining and smelting iron ore into pig iron, fully 90% 
was spent for labour (we very strongly question this) ; 
that in the further conversion of tlie pig into billets 
the cost was about $5.00 per ton, of which only 25%, 
was labour; that the further conversion into rods cost 
about $5.00 per ton more, of which also not more than 
25%, was labour. He said that, in producing pig 
iron $10.00 to $12.00 per ton was paid for labour, 
(we are sure that in this respect Mr. Pearson is very 
much at sea). He further stated that in all but two 
counties in the Province of Nova Scotia there were 
large deposits of ore, and in the very next paragraph 
modified his statement by saying that, although these 
deposits of ore were known to be numerous and of 
high (luality, yet their extent was unknown, and after 
paying a deserved tribute to the work of the last two 
or three years at Londonderry and Torbrook, spoke 
of other deposits concerning which all the information 
which we have is detrimental rather than advantageous. 



THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY AND. THE 
STATE MINING BUREAUS. 

In the course of an interesting address delivered at 
the meeting last November of the American Mining 
Congress, Dr. C. D. Walcott, director of the U.S. 
Geological Survey, after stating that the national 
organization was ready to co-operate, and was, in fact, 
already co-operating with the State Mining Bureaus, 
proceeded as follows: — 

"Co-operation in the collection of statistics of mineral 
production is now in force, and has been carried on for 
several years between the United States Geological 
Survey and the state surveys of Iowa, Maryland and 
North Carolina, and arrangements are now being 
made with the State Geological Survey of Illinois for 
similar co-operation. The state geologists in these 
states act as agents of the United States Geological 
Survey. This office furnishes the stationery and the 



46 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



franking privilege to the agents in these states for the 
purpose of collecting returns, principally from delin- 
fiuent mineral producers the general plan providing 
that the first request for mineral statistics shall be 
sent out direct from the Washington office, and that 
the state geological surveys shall endeavor to procure 
returns from all those not responding to the first re- 
quest. 

"The survey is engaged in co-operative work in 
geology with the states of Maine, New Jersey, Alabama, 
Pennsylvania and Washington. The form" of co-oper- 
ation varies widely. In some states, as Maine and 
Pennsylvania, an appropriation is made by the state 
and placed in the hands of commissioners, who are 
authorized to arrange for co-operation with the federal 
survey. An amount equal to the state appropriation 
is allotted by the federal survey and the work is done 
entirely by the latter organization. By this form of 
co-operation the funds available for expenditure on 
geologic work within the state are doubled and the 
representative of the state indicates the order in which 
various geological problems in the various parts of the 
state shall be investigated. 

"A commoner form of co-operation is that in which 
the federal survey and the state survey each carries out 
certain lines of investigation, and each furnishes to 
the other organization the results obtained. This form 
of co-operation prevents a duplication of work by state 
and federal organizations and secures harmonious 
results. It also supplements the state surveys by fur- 
nishing them the service of specialists who "could not 
otherw'se be secured. 

"This survey has made no active effort to induce 
state organizations to enter into co-operative arrange- 
ments. On all proper occasions, however, it announ- 
ces its willingness to consider any form of co-operation 
with the state organizations which may be appropriate 
for the particular conditions present in each case. 

" Co-operation in topographic work is now carried on 
with California, Illinois, Kentuckv, Maine, Maryland, 
Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The appro- 
priations made by the state for co-operative surveys 
in topography are chiefly used for actual field work, "in 
which are included the salaries of temporary employees, 
who are usually residents of the state, and for the living 
and travelling expenses of the field force. It may be 
used for paying office salaries only so far as it is neces- 
sary to equahze the expenses of both parties to the 
co-operation. 

"The methods pursued for co-operation in hydro- 
graphic investigations are essentially those followed in 
topographic mapping. The funds" furnished by the 
state are supplemented by an equal amount allotted 
from the appropriation for gauging streams and deter- 
mining the water supply of the country. The field 
work is carried on under a general system which has 
resulted from an experience extending over many years. 
The engineers or hydrographers are especially "trained 
for this work, and have charge of the field work, the 
details of which are entrusted as far as practicable, to 
local men. 

"From the experience gained, certain conditions 
essential to the success of co-operation have been 
established. All work which is, in part, paid for by 
the Federal survey and which may be published by it, 
or on its authority, must be controlled by the director. 
He selects assistants to perform such work, or approves 
their selection. In its execution the work is subject 
to the supervision and approval of the appropriate 
chief of the Federal survey. Payments for continuous 
>service on account of stat(> co-operation can, under i\w 



civil service rules, be made to a state official only in 
case he also receives a Federal appointment. Each 
year plans and estimates for the seasoa are mutually 
prepared and a report of operations and results is sub- 
mitted to the state officials, as is customary in the 
United States Survey. All agreements for (;o-operation 
are drawn in such a manner as not to conflict with the 
organic law of the survey in regard to collection, fur- 
nishing information or giving expert testimony. 

"One important point to be considered in all such 
work is that the general plans and methods of the 
Federal survey cannot be set aside on account of state 
co-operation. At the present time the funds available 
for co-operation are so limited that its further extension 
IS dependent upon an increase of appropriations by 
congress. It is against the policy of the survey to 
stop work on important areas or subjects in order that 
co-operation with individual states may be extended. 
The director is willing to enter into "a co-operation 
agreement only when the interests of the country as a 
whole will be benefited. In the execution of the"work, 
certain features must necessarily be taken up first! 
and if this order is in line with what the state desires,' 
co-operation may be had to the greatest advantage] 
both to the state and to the Federal government.' 
The general policy and work of the survey can be 
changed only by the direction of congress." 

It seems to us that the above is suggestive of what 
might also be accomplished in Canada. 



THE NEED OF A FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF 
MINES. 

The time was probably never so opportune as at 
present for the establishment at Ottawa of a Federal 
Department of Mines, under the direction of a re- 
sponsible Minister of the Crown. The industry is now 
on the eve of great developments, and, in the next 
few^ years, under anything like favourable conditions, 
there should take place a quite unparalleled progress 
and growth in Canadian mining. Again, an industry 
whose annual production is already valued at over 
seventy million dollars, and which is therefore a consid- 
erable factor in contributing tow^ards the general pros- 
perity of the Dominion is surely entitled to that recogni- 
tion and assistance which the creation of a distinct 
Department of Mines might be expected to afford. 
It has, we believe, been urged that the Dominion 
Government would scarcely be justified in establishing 
a Mines Department, since it could exercise no juris- 
diction or control over the mines in the provinces. 
But that argument appears singularly ineflfective, 
when attention is called to the useful work for years 
successfully carried on, under precisely similar condi- 
tions, that is so far as these limitations are concerned, 
by the Department of Agriculture. It is asked for 
the mining industry that it be aided and encouraged 
on just such lines. If, for example. Government ex- 
perimental farms are justified, and no one will question 
it, there then should be equally good reasons for the 
establishment of well-equipped government metal- 
lurgical laboratories, where exhaustive experiments 
and tests might be conducted as occasion demanded. 
The need for such experimental works was indicated 
only recently, when, in connection with the Govern- 
ment zinc investigations in British Columbia, ore 
selected for concentration tests, was sent out of the 
covuitry to Colorado for treatment. Obviously it 
would be an advantage if all such work in future could 
be undertaken at home under direct Government 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



47 



supervision. Furthermore, in a case such as Rossland 
district furnishes, where already large sums have been 
spent in the endeavour to discover a cheap and effi- 
cient method of treating the lower grade ores; or, 
another instance, that of the refractory Cobalt ores. 
Government assistance might well be sought and be 
productive of the most important results. 

In addition, of course, to the several experimental 
farms, the work of the Department of Agriculture 
embraces a very wide range. Not only is every farmer, 
every small settler even, in the Dominion, kept well 
supplied with literature of a practical nature, including 
special reports and bulletms, but there are free dis- 
tributions of plants and seeds; and specialists are 
employed to tour the country to actually teach the 
farmer his business. These are but instances of the 
valuable character of a work that is doubtless in no 
small degree responsible for the prosperity now so 
general throughout rural Canada. In very like manner 
the mining industry might be helped forward. What 
is now chiefly desired is the di-ssemination of practical 
information, that will advantage alike the miner, the 
prospector and the investor; and such information 
should, of course, be absolutely dependable and ac- 
curate. The mineral resources of the country also 
recjuire to be more extensively advertised abroad and 
attention called to such progress as is being made. 
This might best be accomplished by the publication 
of statistics at regular and at more frequent intervals 
than at present; while even the very up-to-date 
methods of the U.S. Geological Survey of issuing and 
judiciouly circulating a weekly bulletin summarizing 
the work of the department for these periods, might 
ultimately be adopted. It is not, however, the pur- 
pose of this article to go at length into details, but 
merely to point out that there is ample scope and 
work— which, in fact, might be extended indefinitely 
— for a Federal Department of Mines. 



THE CENTRE STAR AMALGAMATION. 



At a meeting of the shareholders of the Centre Star 
Mining Company, held on January 27th at Toronto, 
the plan as proposed by the directors for the consolida- 
tion of the properties of this company, the St. Eugene 
Mining Company, the Trail Smelter and the Rossland 
Power Company, was duly approved. Under this 
arrangement the capitalization of the consolidated 
property has been placed at $5,500,000.00, of which, 
shares to the equivalent of $4,698,800.00 will be issued 
to shareholders, in exchange for their present holdings, 
on the basis agreed, while $801,200.00 will be reserved 
for treasury uses. The respective companies are also 
contributing $600,000.00 pro rata to provide working 
capital. Previous to the meeting the directors issued 
the following circular: — 

Your directors have for some time past been of the 
opinion that a consolidation of the properties of the 
Centre Star Mining Company (including those of the 
War Eagle Mining Company), the St. Eugene Mining 
Company, the Trail smelter and the Rossland Power 
Company, was desirable and in the interest of the 
shareholders of your company, and to that end caused 
an examination of the various properties to be made, 
and reports thereon to be prepared by Professor R. 
W. Brock, of the Dominion Geological Survey; John 
H. McKenzie, formerly general manager of "the Le 
Roi mines, and a member of the firm of Bradley & 
McKenzie, mining engineers of San Francisco; James 
Cronin, general manager of the Centre Star, War 



Eagle and St. Eugene mines; R. H. Stewart, E.M. 
superintendent of the Centre Star and War Eagle 
and J. M. TurnbuU, E.M. 

Your directors in pursuance of the general scheme 
for amalgamation of the properties above mentioned, 
have, as you have already been advised, entered into 
an agreement providing for the sale of the entire 
assets of your company to the Canadian Consolidated 
Mines, Limited, in consideration of the issue of 15,555 
shares (of the par vahie of $100 each) of the capital 
stock of the last named company the consideration for 
the sale being based upon the "report of the experts 
named above. 

The capitalization of the Canadian Consolidated 
xMines, Limited, will be $5,500,000, of which the sum 
of $4,698,800 stock will be issued in consideration of 
the purchase of the entire assets of the following com- 
panies, in the following proportion, that is to say: 

The St. Eugene Consolidated Mining Co., Ltd $2,33,3,300 
Centre Star Mining Co., including War Eagle 

properties 1,555,500 

Trail smelter 750,000 

Rossland Power Company. . 60^000 

Total $4,698,800 

The remaining $801,200 will be for the present 
retained in the treasury. 

Your directors consider it absolutely necessary that 
the new company should commence business with 
the full complement of supplies and with not less than, 
approximately, $600,000 in cash as working capital! 
and accordingly have arranged that this amount should 
\}e contributed by this company, the St. Eugene com- 
pany and the Trail smelter in proportion to the relative 
values fixed by them for the purpose of amalgamation, 
the working capital so contributed being included in 
the values above stated. 

Your directors are of the opinion that the amalga- 
mation is very greatly in the interests of the share- 
holders of all the companies, as affording greater 
security for the payment of dividends, both in relation 
to a consistent or average production of ore and as 
giving to the amalgamated company a self-contained 
business not dependent upon its ability to make 
satisfactory contracts with independent smelters. 



THE COPPER SITUATION. 

The National Conduit & Cable Company reports copper as 
remarkably steady and strong at about the level of 18|c. for 
electrolytic wire bars for delivery from three to six months hence 

The danger of any decided reaction this side of .June or July 
has been reduced to a minimum by aggressive buying on the part 
of some large consumers and nmning through to July. An era 
of high prices has been established and conditions have swung 
around in favor of keeping business up to the new level of prices. 

The production has increased considerably over previous 
years. It is probable the United States copper production' last 
year was not far from .39.5,000 to 400,000 tons, as against 362,- 
739 tons, or an uicrease of about 10%, which is only about normal 
for the domestic output. Consumption for 1905 in this country is 
estimated at between 600,000,000 and 650,000,000 pounds. 
The year 1906 began with a scarcity of available copper, and the 
question of ready stoclcs is less of a factor than in many years. 
The trade reports from London are of an encouraging nature. 
Stocks of copper in Europe are small and with a strong stat- 
istical position there is no chance for the market to be other 
than firm. 



48 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



THE CALCITE VEIN--A TALE OF COBALT. 



By Dr. W. H. Dhummonu. 

J used to be leeviii' on Boiiaiiii, 

Fines' place on de lake, you bet! 

An' dough I go off only wanee, sapree! 

I t'ink I will leev' dere yet, 

Wit' tree growin' down to de water side, 

Were leetle bird dance an' sing — 

Only come an' see you don't shout wit' me, 

Hooraw! for Temiskaming! 

But silver boom an' de cobalt bloom 

Play de devil wit' Bonami, 

So off on de wood we all nnis' go, 

Leevin' de familee — 

Shovel an' pick, hammer an' drill. 

We carry dem ev'ry w'ere, 

For workiii' away all night an' day 

Till it's tam to be millionaire. 

So it aint very long w'en I mak' de strike, 

W'at dey're callin' the vein cal-cite. 

Quarter an inch, jus' a leetle " pinch " 

But soon she is come all right 

An' widen out beeg : mebbe wan sixteen 

An' now we have got her sure! 

So we jonip on our hat, w'en she go lak' dat. 

Me an' Bateese Couture! 

Early in spring we see dat vein, 
W'en de pat-ridge begin to drum, 
De leaf on de bu.sh start in wit' a rush, 
An' de skeeter commence to come- 



Very nice tam on de wood for .sure, 
If you want to be goin' die, 
Skeeter at night till it's come daylight, 
An' affer dat, small black fly! 

Couple o' gang lak dat ma frien', 

'Specially near de swamp 

An' hongry too, dey can bite an' chew 

An' kip you upon de jomp — 

But never you min', only work away 

So long as de vein is dere — 

For a t'ing so small don't count at all. 

If you want to be millionaire. 

"An' dis is de price, " Bateese he say, 

"T'ree million or not'ing at all!" 

An' I say "you're crazy, it's five you mean 

An' more, if you wait till fall! 

An' s'pose de silver was come along 

An' cobalt she bloom an' bloom, 

W^e look very sick if we sole too quick 

An' ev'ry t'ing's on de boom." 

De cash we refuse w'en dey hear de news, 

W'en I t'ink of dat cash to-day, 

I feel lak a mouse on a great beeg house 

W'en de familee move away. 

One million, two million, no use to us — 

Me an' Bateese Couture, 

So we work away ev'ry night an' day 

De sam; we was alway poor. 

An' den wan morning a stranger man, 

A man wit' hees hair all w'ite. 

Look very wise, an' he's moche surprise 

W'en he's seein' dat vein cal-cite 

An' he say, "Ma frien', for de good advice 

I hope you'll mak' some room 

From sweetheart girl to de wide, wide worl' 
Ketch ev'ry t'ing on de bloom! 

Kip your eye on de vein' for dere's many a slip 
Till you drink of de silver cup, 
An' if you're not goin' to go 'way down — 
You're goin' to go 'way, 'way up." 

" Now w'at does he mean," Bateese he say, 
Affer de ole man lef, 

"Mebbe want to buy, but he t'ink it's high 

So we'll finish de job ourse'f, 

Purty (juick too," an' den hooraw. 

We form it de compagnie. 

An' to geev dem a sight on de vein cal-cite 

We work it on I^onami, 



Can't count de money dat'.s comin' in, 

Sam' as de lotterie. 

Kv'ry wan try, till bimel)y 

Dere's not many dollar on Bonami. 

An' de gang we put onto de job right off, 

Nearly twenty beside de cook. 

Hammer an' drill (ill dey're nearly kill. 

An' feller to watch de book. 

Too many man, an' I see it now. 

An' I'm sorry 'cos I'm de bcss. 

For walkin' aroun' all over de groun' 

Dat's reason de vein get los' 

Ea.sy enough wit' de lantt^rn too, 
Seein' dat vein las' night. 
But to-day I'm out, lookin' all about 
An' w'ere is dat vein cal-cite? 

Very curious t'ing, but you can't blame me 
For I try very hard I'm sure — ' 
Ilelpin' dem on till de vein is gone 
Me an' Bateese Couture, ' 

So of course I wonder de way she go 

An' twenty cent too, a share 

An' I can't understan' dat stranger man 

W'at he mean w'en he'.s sayin' dere 

" Kip your eye on de vein for dere's many a slip 
Till you drink of de silver cup, ' 
An' if you're not goin' to go 'way down, ■ 
You're goin' to go 'way, 'way up!" 



NOTE ON A NEW INSTRUMENT FOR 
SURVEYING DEEP BORE HOLES. 

By J. B. Porter, D.Sc, M. Can.. Soc.C. E. 

Read before the Mining Section, 30th November, 1905. 

It is a well-known fact that deep borings are seldom 
true, and although artesian wells seldom depart very 
much from the vertical owing to the method of drilling 
them, yet diamond drill holes and other borings with 
rotary apparatus very frequently drift very far out of 
line. So long as the hole is not deep this drifting is not 
a serious matter, but on holes of say 1,000 feet, the de- 
parture from line sometimes exceeds ten per cent. In 
extreme cases such as certain very deep recent borings 
near Johannesburg, holes which "were intended to be 
vertical have drifted more than 2,.500 feet to one side of 
their aim. 

In view of the great cost of thesedeep borings it is 
extremely desirable that the exact location of cores 
brought to the surface should be determinable, and a 
number of devices have been introduced within the last 
few years for the purpose of surveying holes. Most of 
these devices are comparatively crude and their use 
involves a great deal of labor. 

The apparatus most generally u.sed of late years has 
been a cylinder of glass, portially filled with hydrofluoric 
acid. This cylinder, usually less than one inch dia- 
meter, is inclosed in a brass case and attached to the 
end of a string of screwed rods and lowered into the hole 
to a known depth where it is left for some hours and 
then withdrawn. The inclination of the hole can easily 
be read from the glass vessel, as the upper surface of the 
hydrofluoric acid etches the glass quite distinctlv, but 
the direction of the hole can only be determined by 
marking the orientation of the top rod while the etching 
is taking place, marking each joint when the rods are 
taken apart and finally screwing them together again 
on the surface in order to compare the orientation marks 
with the etching on the glass tube. By surveying 
points at distances of say 300 or even 500 feet, the 
general course of a bore hole can be determined by the 

Trans. Can. S. C. E., Nov., 1905. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



49 



method above described, but the method is laborious 
and costly and owing to almost unavoidable twisting 
of the rods the results have seldom proA'ed \'erv satis- 
factory. 

Another method of surveying involves the use of 
plummets and compasses immersed in a solution of 
, gelatine which slowly hardens after the apparatus has 
been sent down the hole. This device, although very 
ingenious, has proved very difficult in use and has not 
met with much success, especially in deep holes. A very 
recent form of the apparatus uses paraffine in place of 
gelatine. The instrument contains an electric resistance 
and is connected with a dynamo on the surface by 
double insulated cables. The compass and plummet 
remain fixed in the solid paraffine while the instrument 
is lowered to the station in the hole. Current is then 
sent through the cable and the paraffine melted. The 
current is then shut off and after sufficient time has 
elapsed for the paraffine to solidify the instrument is 
reeled in and its records read. The apparatus should 
give accurate results, but the long line of insulated 
cable is costly and liable to injurv. (Marriott— Trans. 
Inst. Min. and xMet., Feb., 1905.) 

A few months ago an instrument maker in Johannes- 
burg designed a very ingenious apparatus containing 
compass, plummets, small cameras and electric light, 
the>'hole connected with a small adjustable clock so 
that the light could be turned on for a given period after 
the apparatus had been lowered into the hole. This 
apparatus was described by its inventor, Wm. Helme, 
at a meeting of the Institute of Mining Sm-veyors of the 
Transvaal on xMay 27th, 1905. It has since'been used 
in surveying a number of holes and has proven ex- 
tremely satisfactory. 

A prominent mining engineer of the author's ac- 
quamtance states that he has had the machine tested 
by surveying several holes twice and has found the 
readings to agree so closely in all cases that he scarcely 
considers it necessary to take check readings unless the 
first set show some unusual change of direction in the 
hole. The apparatus, instead of requiring rods, the 
use of which involves a great expenditure of time and 
labor, and the use of a derrick and a power hoist, can 
be lowered on the end of a piece of flexible wire from a 
large reel and thus several observations per day may be 
taken by two men. 

The writer has not had an opportunitg to use the 
instrument in actual surveying, but has taken a number 
of observations with it on the surface and has found its 
records interesting and apparently exact. He there- 
fore feels justified in submitting the following brief 
description of the instrument taken from the original 
paper by its inventor. 

GENER.\L DESCRIPTION. 

Briefly described, this instrument is one in which 
both dip and deviation are recorded bv means of photo- 
graphs of the positions of both a plumb-bob and a ma- 
gnetic needle at any desired point in a bore-hole. The 
photographs are taken by means of two small electric 
lamps lit by a " time contact. " 

DETAILED DESCRIPTION. 

The instrument comprises a brass cylinder 20 to 30 
inches long: both length and diameter are varied to 
suit the particular requirements. The cvlinder is made 
in two portions, which screw together quite flush 
shoulder to shoulder. The top and bottom are closed 
by means of tightly-fitting screwed plugs. To the top 
plug is attached a brass swivel with an eve piece, by 
which the instrument is suspended. The swivel is 
fitted to the plug with ball bearings. The object of 
this swivel IS to prevent the wire, which is used in low- 



ering the instrument , from twisting; also, to minimise 
risk of the instniment kicking against the sides of the 
borehole when being lowered or raised. Inside the 
cylinder, immediately beneath the top plug, is a spring 
resting on a pad, which keeps firmly in position a small 
watch or timepiece. Below the watch is a dry batterv. 
Below this again is arranged a tiny electric lamp, and 
below the lamp is a glass plate, from the centre of 
which hangs a small plumb-bob. Below the plumb- 
bob is a circular brass jilate supported on g'mbal bear- 
ings, so that it always remains in a horizontal position. 
On this plate is placed a small disc of sensitised paper. 

piACRAW OF INSTRUMENT 




H 



Below this is another electric lamp, and below this 
again is a compass, which is also supported on gimbal 
bearings. On the dial plate of the compass is placed 
another disc of sensitised paper; each disc is pierced by 
a Pin-prick in the centre, and another on one side, and 
both discs are fixed in exactly the same relative posi- 
tion, one above the other, when in the instrument. 
1 he whole is kept firmly in position from below by 
another spring placed under the little cup holding the 
magnetic needle, and resting on the bottom screwed 
plug. When the hand of the watch is passing the 12 
o clock point on the dial, it makes contact for about 15 



50 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



seconds with a small projecting spring made of copper 
foil, which is connected with one line from the battery. 
The hand of the watch is cormected with the other line; 
and so, when in contact with the spring, the circuit is 
completed; both electric lamps are lighted; and photo- 
graphs are taken of the positions of the plumb-bob and 
the magnetic needle. It is only necessary to set the 
watch so that the hand will only pass the 12 o'clock 
point after sufficient time has elapsed to allow for the 
instrument being lowered to the i-equired depth, and 
also to allow for the plumb-bob and magnetic needle 
having come to rest. In practice, it is usual to take 
readings at, say, every 200 feet to 300 feet, and two 
readings should invariably be taken in each instance. 
When once the photographs have been obtained, the 
rest of the work is easy; for the height of the point of 
suspension of the plumb-bob above the centre of the 
disc being known, and the distance of the lower end of 
of the plumb-bob from the centre of the disc having 
been obtained by accurately measuring the distance 
between the centre os the photograph of the plumb- 
bob and the centra of the disc, angle of dip can be 
calculated. The direction is also easily obtained by 
placing the two discs in the same relative positions 
which they occupied while in the instrument, which 
can at once be done by means of the two pin-pricks 
on each. The direction of the line joining the centre 
with the image of the plumb-bob on the one disc will 
then (unless it happens to fall in the magnetic meridian) 
make an angle with the photograph of the magnetic 
needle on the other disc, and from this angle the 
magnetic direction of the path of the borehole at that 
particular point is determined. In surveying a bore- 
hole, say 4,000 feet in length, two sets of readings 
should first be obtained at regular intervals, which 
should not exceed 250 feet in length. When these 
have been obtained, the dip and deviation must be 
calculated for each point, and then sufficient data are 
available to plot, in plan and section, the true path 
taken by the borehole. (Pro.. Institute of Mine Sur- 
veyors, Transvaal, May 27, 1905.) 



THE WEST GORE ANTIMONY DEPOSITS. 



By Alex. McNeil, President of the Dominion Anti- 
mony Co. Ltd. 

This is written at the editor's request for information 
about the West Gore Antimony deposits. The number 
of such inquiries now coming from foreign countries 
shows that this property is becoming known abroad. 
Enough has been learned to say that Nova Scotia will 
in the future be an important producer of antimony 
and your readers may therefore be interested in the 
matter. 

Antimony was discovered at West Gore, Hants 
County, Nova Scotia, twenty-five years ago. In Nova 
Scotia, antimony as a mineral passes to the owner of 
the soil. The formers who made the discovery under- 
took the development and operation of the mine. 
Making a mine and building a load of hay are two diffe- 
rent things, but it is fail' to say that the West Gore mine 
in those days was managed as well as many Nova 
Scotia gold mines have been. Several thousand tons 
or high grade ore were taken out and shipped and sold 
to Swansea smelters. The ore was sold at the time for 
its antimony contents. The present company believe 
that the ore then shipped contained between i>100,000 
and $200,000. in gold, about which nothing was said 
by sculler or buyer. 



A good mine with high values can stand bad man- 
agement to a certain depth. In this case it went to 
400 ft., and stopped. Then it became an abandoned 
mnie for a decade. During the interval some prospect- 
ing in search of a southern vein resulted successfully 
and a small (juantity of very good ore was taken from 
there. 

The property was taken over from the writer by the 
Dominion Antimony Company, Limited, at the begin- 
ning of 1903. Since that time the old mine has been 
unwatered and the underground workings remodelled 
so that prospecting could be carried on systematically 
and economically. There has been no cessation of 
work since. The main shaft was carried down a little 
over 500 ft., levels were extended on the 2, 3. 4, and 
500 ft. level. At 260 feet east on the 500 ft. level :i 
winze was put down 200 feet and a level driven back 
toward the main shaft. About the .same distance 
west on the 500 ft. level similar work is proceeding. 
The main purpose of this was to determine the advisa- 
bility and correct position for a larger main shaft which 
will be driven vertically to intersect the vein at about 
1000 feet. The vein on which this work is being done 
is a fissure. It is very clearly defined, especially on the 
700 ft. level. Sometimes the vein narrows to a foot 
or two; sometimes it widens to eight or nine feet. 
Generally on the 700 ft. level there is an average of two 
to four feet of very good ore. The development work 
so far carried on, with a small amount of necessary 
stoping, has yielded about 700 tons of high grade ore 
and 7,000 tons of second class ore. The separation 
is arbitary and mechanical and made for the purpose 
of selling ore containing over '40^ antimony. This 
first-class ore has averaged about 45^ antimony and 
a little over $50. in gold per ton. The dump ore, so 
far as can be judged on the sampling done, contains 
between $20 to $30, in both metals. 

The policy pursued by the company in making the 
mine has been a fairly conservative one. A small but 
effective prospecting plant housed in plain but well 
arranged buildings enabled the Company to put in 
underground development most of the eighty odd 
thousand dollars, that have been spent. Then the 
Company looked around for a good man for Manager. 
They found him located in Boise City, Idaho, accepted 
his terms with regard to salary, built the kind of house 
he wanted for his family, and showed that it trusted 
his honesty and judgment by accepting his plan of 
work. The result has been satisfactory. 

West Gore is a pretty valley with fertile farms that 
can grow good apples. It also grows good young men 
who leave it for the LTnited States and other parts when 
they grow up. Since the building of the Midland Rail- 
way one can reach this section by rail which is 2^ miles 
from the mine. From Clarkesville on the railway over 
a fairly good road, part of which has been built by the 
Company, one reaches nearly the highest point in the 
County, which, although a highland for Hants, is not 
more than a good sized hill. Up on this hill the Com- 
pany- has acquired territory until it now owns about 
500 acres, covering about 1^ miles on the strike of the 
A'eins. Antimony float has been found in various di- 
rections from the mine. At Central llawdon, five 
miles away, there was enough antimony in the gold 
ore to make profitable recovery by amalgamation im- 
possible. 

The problem of recovering both the antimony and 
the gold was taken up as soon as the present operations 
began at the mines. It is not a new question, for 
antimony-gold ore has been found in other pis and 
at various times large sums have been spent u, n pro- 
cesses for recovery, which, for one i-eason or other, have 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



51 



turned out unprofitable. The Company working at 
West Gore first turned it.s attention to concentration. 
Experiments carried on upon quantities of several 
tons in a regular mill plant established that a good con- 
centrate could be obtained.* Dry concentration on a 
smaller quantity was also successful. The necessary 
loss in concentration and the comparatively low values 
obtained in the ordinary market for the met'al contents, 
induced the Company to carry on an elaborate series of 
experiments with a view to reaching direct recovery 
or the gold contents at the mine. The Companv was 
encouraged in its work by the fact that in the market 
the price for the gold contents rose while it was at 
work from SO'"; or assay value to a basis of paving full 
value less SIO. It may safely be said that the treat- 
ment of antimony-gold ore for the recovery of a high 
percentage of both metals at a moderate cost has been 
solved. A similar ore in France led to the problem 
being submitted to J. 8. MacArthm- of Glasgow, cele- 
brated for his connection with the cyanide treatment. 
By using a weak .solution of caustic soda. Mr. IMac- 
Arthur found that he could put the stibnite readily and 
quickly in solution and by drawing the carbonic acid 
gas from the fires he could precipitate the antimony 
in a brown powder. As the gold was not afTected by 
his process it remained in the residue. The residue 
was treated by calcination and cyanide and 95% of 
the gold recovered. When Mr. MacArthur visited the 
mine at West Gore he found a new problem facing him. 
The eastern winze had passed through a heavy body of 
native antimony. There is not ki^own a similar bod\' 
of native antimony in the world, although it has been 
found in small quantities in other j^arts. Its occur- 
rence here necessitated further experimental work by 
Mr. MacArthur which, it is understood, has resulted 
successfully. After three years of investigation the 
Dominion Antimony Company has reached the con- 
clusion that it can proceed to treat its own ores, anrl 
the work of doing that will be begun during the present 
year. The experimental work of this Company ^vill be 
the subject of a special paper in the Nova Scotia Gov- 
ernment mine report of the present year, prepared 
therefor by D'Arcy Weatherbe, the 'capable metal 
mine Inspector of the province. Manv mining men of 
prominence have visited the works at' West Gore, and 
they have all expressed their opinion as favourable to 
the future of the mine there. 



MINING IN QUEBEC IN 1905. 



(By our special commissioner.) 

Mining operations in the Province of Quebec were 
carried on during the past year with regularity and 
success. 

Asbestos has been in good demand, and the mines 
at Thetford, Black Lake and Danville have been work- 
ing to full capacity, with the result that the output 
will be exceptionally great. New properties have also 
been developed at Tingwick and Wolfestown and the 
mica market conditions appear to have improved, 



and the principal mines of the Ottawa region have 
been steadily operated. The price for small mica is 
considered satisfactory, but for larger sizes conditions 
are not so advantageous. Several firms at Ottawa 
are now taking the mica produced in Quebec and Ot- 
tawa, it being split by them and then shipped to the 
United States. It is a matter perhaps noteworthy 
to state that these same firms are also handling Indian 
mica. Attention has recently been called to the white 
mica mines of the Province, on account of the rare 
metals, such as radium, thorium, uranium, cerium 
and others which are found in association with mus- 
covite, and, it is alleged, occur in workable quantities. 
A company has been organized to develop several of 
these mines in our Laurentian range. 

Phosphate is obtained in small quantities in work- 
ing the amber mica mines, and is utilized chiefly at 
Buckingham, in competition with American phosphate. 

Chrome mining and concentration is becoming a 
permanent industry in Coleraine, and the production 
is steadily increasing every year. The concentrates 
are high grade and regular in composition. They 
find a fair market in the United States, although they 
are brought in competition with the Caledonia ores, 
which are produced chiefly, and on a large scale. 

The conversion of iron ore into pig has been in pro- 
gress at Drummondville and Radnor. Good results 
attended last year, as usual, the working of the well 
known copper mines of Capelton, a part of the pro- 
duet being utilized locally in the manufacture of sul- 
phuric acid, while the remainder was shipped to the 
United States. There are meanwhile rumours of the 
re-opening of some of the old copper properties in the 
district of Sherbrooke. 

At Three Rivers the ochre production has been 
continued. 

Conditions in Graphite mining continue difficult, but 
an improvement has taken place and this branch of 
the industry is likely ere long to assume much greater 
proportions. There is no change in the condition of 
Feldspar and Baryte. 

Natural gas is now being used in the Eastern Town- 
ships for domestic purposes in several of the villages 
near Three Rivers, while successful experiments have 
been carried on for the compression of peat near 
Farnham. 

On the north shore of the St. Lawrence a large 
quantity of magnetic sand has been ascertained, 
and recent tests indicate the possibility of successful 
concentration and utilization of this^ material. 

The building and ornamental stone quarries have 
been worked extensively, and it is also worth recording 
that cement works have been established at Hull 
and are producing from 1500 to 1800 bbls. of material 
a day. 

Speaking generally, the mining industry in Quebec 
durmg the year has made a steady advance, which, 
m the near future will be considerably accelerated.' 
Not the least notable of the year's developments is 
the confirmation of the improved and promising dis- 
coveries in the Chibogamoo district, and there is every 
reason to believe that this region in Northern Quebec 
will become in due course a profitable field of mining 
operation. 



52 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




I 





The Fiberizing Plant of The Bell's Asbestos Co., Thetford. 




Quarry of The Bell's Asbestos Co., Thetford-- Lookino- West. 



54 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




New 500 Tons Asbestos Separation Plant of King Bros., Thetforu. 




The Asbestos and Asbistic Coy's Plant, Danville. 



5? 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



MINING IN QUEBE(J IN 1905. 




The United Asbestos Co's Works — Spinning Dept. 




The Ti.ANT of The Johnson's Asbe.stos Co., Black Lake. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



57 




58 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



THE BEARING OF ENGINEERING ON MINING. 
With Especial Reference to Mining Education.* 

By Prof. J. B. Porter, Hon. D.Sc. 

(Continued from the January Review.) 

About sixty or seventy years a^o civil engineering 
had become a sufficiently definite profession to attract 
the attention of the schools and many colleges and 
universities, both at Home and abroad, created de- 
partments of engineering. In most cases a single 
instructor or professor was called upon to do the work ; 
at best the staff was meagre, and experimental appar- 
atus of the simplest kind had to suffice; but again the 
day was saved by the enthusiasm of these pioneers in 
a new educational field. The teaching was of necessity 
chiefly general and theoretical, and details, when treat- 
ed at all, were discussed informally. The result of 
this method and of this enthusiasm was that the young 
men went out with high heart, ready for any fate, and 
therefore their success was great. Of these men are 
the great engineers of the present day. 

As engineering science developed^ its practice be- 
came specialised and forty odd years ago the schools 
began to follow suit. Mining aiid metallurgy had al- 
ways been considered somewhat apart, and often were 
the first subjects to receive special consideration. In 
other cases, schools originally instituted as schools of 
niines crystallised out successively departments of 
civil, mechanical, electrical engineering, etc. 

This process of differentiation has gone further in 
the United States than elsewhere, and no less than 
thirteen separate and distinct engineering courses are 
offered with more promised for the immediate future*. 
Even in Canada, where we are accused of being con- 
servative, my own University offers its bewildered 
matriculant six or seven formal engineering courses, 
and some of these again branch in the final year. 
These special courses are no doubt necessary, and 
their number will probably increase; but great harm 
will be done to engineering in a broad sense if this 
tendency to specialised teaching cannot be kept within 
strict bounds. 

The same fundamental sciences underlie all branches • 
the same training in physics, mathematics, and mechan- 
ics is essential to a true understanding of each profession 
and the man who learns these and other basal subjects 
thoroughly, even at the expense of technical training, 
is far more likely to succeed ultimately even in any 
special technical work than the man who has received 
elaborate training in one line, but whose first principles 
are "weak." Furthermore, not one student in a dozen 
knows when he comes up to the University which 
branch of engineering he really prefers; still less does 
he know which one he will ultimately practise. Young 
engineers are no less subject to chance and circum- 
stance than other men; and for this reason, even if 
there were no better one, we should strive first to make 
our men engineers, and then and then only give them 
special training. 

The fact that no man can tell in advance what his 
life's work will be is sometimes used as an argument in 
favour of a general engineering course, with a smattering 
of everything. An intelligent boy who keeps his eyes 
operi will learn not a little of many practical things in 
connection with his theoretical studies, and the most 
effective method of teaching is to point theory with 
practical illustration whenever this can be done without 
losing sight of the main issue. It is, however, a most 
serious mistake to make a course general rather than 

*Architectural, chpiiiical, civil, conmie'rcial, electrical, hy- 
draulic, mechanical, nielalliufrical, niiniiii., mi nicipal, na\al, 
railway, and .sanilary eiifrinccriiifr. 



thorough, and even a speciality really well taught is 
better than broad, but shallow instruction. 

The courses in mining engineering' offered by the best 
schools, especially in the United States and Canada, are 
frequently criticised as hiiving the fault I have just 
named: in brief of being too broad and of attemj)ting too 
much. Mining engineers, in all but a few favoured 
localities, are usually alone so far as trained associates 
go, and the problems they have "to face are more varied 
than those coming to any other engineers. General 
engineering work and surveying are their daily task; 
simple problems in electrical and mechanical engineer- 
ing must be disposed of without the assistance of 
specialists, and a good knowledge of geology with some 
mineralogy and chemistry is absolutely essential. No 
other engineer must know so many things; and, there- 
fore, in general, we teach our mining students more sub 
jects than are ordinarily given in other engineering 
courses. It is a fair question, however, whether even 
electrical and mechanical engineers would not be the 
better for a fair knowledge of geology, and such simple 
chemistry as we give our candidates for mining degrees. 

Mining courses are sometimes ol>jected to by another 
class of critics, the so-called practical men, as being too 
theoretical, and by a third class as being too technical 
and material at the expense of theory. These criti- 
cisms neutralize one another to a large extent, but I 
fear that the last has occasional justification, and shall 
deal with it later. 

Thus far, I have not touched upon a matter that is 
just now receiving a great deal of attention, viz., the j 
extent to which practical and technical training should ij 
enter into an engineering education. This subject has it 
recently been discussed by so many different learned \i 
bodies and individuals that I approach it with hesita- i 
tion. It is, however, of vital importance to engineering 
education, and must be carefully considered. 

The last word on technical education is in the form of 
a report or to speak more correctly, a series of questions, 
issued a few weeks ago by the Committee on Engineer- 
ing Education of the Institution of Civil Engineers. 
This committee, under the chairmanship of the last pre- 
sident of the Institution, Sir William White, has evi- 
dently considered the subject very carefully, and has 
made up its mind on certain points. On others it is 
apparently divided, and the alternative opinions are 
stated briefly and impartially. The paper is now in the 
hands of a number of engineers and educators, who have 
been asked to reply to certain questions ; and the com- ■ 
mittee will no doubt give due weight to their opinions 
when it draws up its final report. • 

It would be improper for me to discuss this paper at 
length; but I think I may state certain conclusions, 
with which I heartily concur, without betraying any 
confidence. The committee is apparently convinced 
(a) that engineering students in all branches should take 
the same course in the elementary sciences, and in cer- 
tain advanced subjects; and that technical work and 
studies in their special branch should be deferred to the 
last part of the course. This point has already been 
sufficiently discussed. 

The committee thinks that: (b) Engineering students 
should have some practical elementary manual train- 
ing, and that this had best be regular work in shops of 
one or more kinds. The aihount of this work, its exact 
nature, and whether it should precede, accompany, or 
follow the academic work are, however, matters on 
which the committee does not express a definite opi- 
nion, (c) Tlie committee thinks that students should 
also have some practical technical training in' works 
The nature and amount of this training, and whether it 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



59 



should precede, accompany, or follow the technical part 
of the course, are not definitely decided. 

An engineering student, whatever his specialty, 
should undoubtedly do some shop work on the ordinary 
materials of construction at a very early period in his 
course. He will not be able to spare time enough to 
become a skilled workman, or even a half-skilled ap- 
prentice, and he must be made to fully understand this ; 
but he can and should work long enough to know some- 
thing of the use of tools, and to understand the qualities 
of the materials of construction which he is about to 
study theoretically. This elementary shop work is 
often attempted in workshops connected with the tech- 
nical schools themselves, and frequently it can be done 
in the afternoons while regular studies are going on. 
This method is economical of time, and there are many 
advantages in having the teaching and shop work under 
the same direction; but unless a boy is to get thorough 
practical training later it is better for him to get his ex- 
perience in ordinary shops, where he would be required 
to work full time under ordinary shop discipline. In 
no other way can he be made to realize what work really 
is; the intimate acquaintance with workmen is also very 
useful. 

This shop work if done outside of the school can usual- 
ly be arranged for the long vacation which should be 
long enough to give time for it, and for a reasonable 
holiday. Two periods of two or three months each in 
two successive vacations should suffice for an ordinary 
boy, especially as practical technical training is also re- 
quired at a later period in his course. This latter tech- 
nical work is even more important, in my opinion, than 
the shop experience. It should, if possible, follow the 
general science teaching, and precede the specialisation. 

These students should first be taken to the mines in a 
body and be given an opportunity to study works under 
the guidance of a staff of competent instructors. After 
a month or six weeks of this field class work each stu- 
dent should obtain bona-fide employment in some 
works in his chosen speciality, but the exact nature of 
the work is of no very great moment, so long as it is 
good engineering work, done by good workmen intelli- 
gently directed. The important thing again is to get 
the student in touch with real work and real wage- 
earners, and to give him an idea of scale. The elemen- 
tary shop work may be done if necessary at convenient 
times in a school workshop, but this technical work 
must be real in every respect. The student should, for 
the time being, become a pialn workman on wages, res- 
ponsible to his foreman for certain duties, and liable to 
penalty or discharge for cause. 

The time to be given to the work must depend on 
circumstances. Three months, under the right sort of 
foreman, in a small but interesting mine or works, will 
teach as much as a year of ill-directed drudgery. Fur- 
ther more, students differ greatly in the readiness with 
which they take to practical work. I have known men 
who were the better students for having had many years 
of hard apprenticeship; but very frequently the' man 
who has spent even one year in practice finds it difficult 
to return to his classes. He is earning money at work, 
and can often ill-afford to give it up, and again become 
dependent on his people. Study also often proves irk- 
some, and sometimes very difficult, after a man has 
been actively employed in work. As a result, many 
men fail to return to their final studies, and thus lose 
what should be the most useful part of their education. 

If a definite time for practical experience must be set 
in advance, I should say that two periods of about four 
months each in different works, or one period of a year 
would be about right; but in this, as in all other matters 
of technical education, it is far better to make the regu- 



lations somewhat elastic in respect of field work and 
advanced study. Much time can be saved the students, 
and their work made more effective, if each case is sep- 
arately considered by the responsible head of their 
school. 

The final studies may now be considered. The student 
fresh from the field, but not yet forgetful of school me- 
thods, usually begins this advanced work with enthu- 
siasm. The teaching may now be distinctly specialised 
and quite technical, but care must be taken to keep 
fundamental principles in sight, and the detailed tech- 
nical work should be carefully laid out to cover only cer- 
tain important typical operations. This academic 
work can be made much more interesting and effective 
by the free use of technical laboratories, in which en- 
gineering machinery (and in our case ore-dressing and 
metallurgical apparatus) can be used; but here, as in 
the lecture-room, care must be taken to teach principles, 
not processes. Certain processes must of course be 
used, and a good deal of careful detailed work done; but 
the primary purpose must always be to teach general 
principles, and mere technology must be kept in a se- 
condary place. The best function of laboratories, 
aside from the limited use necessary to illustrate fun- 
damental principles, is to develop the individuality of 
the students. Each man should be given certain care- 
fully selected pieces of independent work, and he should 
be encouraged to attack the task in his own way. One 
or two comparatively heavy investigations are far 
better than many short experiments, and the instructor 
in charge can often do his men far more good by show- 
ing interest, and yet letting them work out their own 
salvation whenever possible, than by being too ready to 
set up apparatus ^and smooth over difficulties. This 
advanced individual work can utilise to the full the 
resources of even the most magnificently equipped labo- 
ratories; but care should always be taken, especially in 
schools which like my own are very rich in practical 
apparatus, to see that the students do a few things 
thoughtfully, and with a clear apprehension of their 
bearing, rather than that they get shallower experience 
of many processes and machines. 

In connnection with this advanced study the men 
should be taught to write up their work, and to apply 
the knowledge gained in works, laboratories, and lec- 
ture rooms, to some practical problems in engineering. 
In this, questions of estimates and costs should be con- 
sidered, for our men now are about to go out into the 
world, where costs from an essential element in every 
enterprise. Estimates made even by advanced students 
are likely to be far from right, but their preparation 
gives the men extremely valuable experience, and a 
competent, instructor can do excellent work by 
discussing economic matters with his men in this stage 
of their training. 

This should end the school course in engineering, for 
no amount of mere teaching will turn a boy into an 
engineer, still less into a mining engineer. If,' however 
we give him a good grounding in science and the prin- 
ciples of engineering, then put him in touch with prac- 
tical engineering work, and finally teach him the ele- 
ments of the technology of his subject, we shall have 
prepared him as well as any school can prepare a man 
to go out into the world and learn to become a good en- 
gineer. 

The course that I have outlined is, I think, decidedly 
better than anything that is now offered by the schools 
at Home or abroad, because it makes a certain amount 
of practical work obligatory, and yet connects and even 
combines this work with at least as much theoretical 
and pure science study as is now required. It has 
however, the disadvantage of taking four or five years' 



60 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



instead of three or four as at present, and it presupposes 
the most cordial support of the works and mine mana- 
gers. « 

The feeling of managers and superintendents has 
changed greatly in the last few years, and tolerance, at 
least, can now be counted on, even when warmer feel- 
ings are still lacking; but even the most friendly mana- 
ger cannot be blamed for feeling some hesitation about 
subscribing to a scheme that will require him to regular- 
ly take on student workmen. He will say that such 
boys are in the way, do not earn their pay, add to his 
anxiety, cause dissatisfaction among his regular work- 
men, and in the end leave, him and go back to school 
just when they are beginning to be of use. If he is very 
well disposed, he may even ask to be let off with a con- 
tribution to the school funds, or to some approved cha- 
rity. If he is a mere man, his request will be quite 
different. The objections stated are all quite real, but 
like objections to many other good things they become 
comparatively unimportant when fairly faced. A few 
years ago I persuaded some of my friends in Canada and 
the United States to try the plan, and gave them each 
one or two young men for the experiment. The stu- 
dents did not prove troublesome, quickly made friends 
among the workmen, and in many cases even earned 
their pay. It is true that they had to go back to school 
after a few months, but not infrequently they took back 
with them a promise of permanent employment and re- 
turned to the mine immediately after taking their de- 
grees. In brief, the managers have found the difficult- 
ies far less than they expected, and in part, at least, 
counterbalanced by the fact that they now come to 
know intimately a number of young men from whom 
they can select the best later, if they need to increase 
their staff. Nearly every manager who has tried the 
plan is willing to take on the next year, and some have 
become really interested in the students, on whom they 
are able to confer such great benefits, and thus have 
become active and invaluable assistants in the work of 
mining education. 

I make no claim to have been the first to use this 
means of supplementing a mining school education. 
Individual students have done holiday or interim work 
in mines ever since mining schools began ; but it does 
not give me great satisfaction to be able to say that my 
friends, the mine and smelter managers, have come 
forward so cordially, that for several years I have been 
able each summer to secure an engagement at at least 
living wages for every boy in my classes who has been 
willing to work. Over 80 per cent, of them do actually 
work in this way each summer, although our regulations 
do not as yet require them to do so. 

One other difficulty in my plan is that it requires a 
larger staff of instructors than ordinary teaching, and 
these instructors must be good men, heartily interested 
in their work. Formal lectures and set exercises may 
perhaps be acceptably given to classes by men whose 
chief interest is outside the class room ; but no man can 
succeed in such close individual teaching as I have re- 
commended, unless he give his whole time and his whole 
heart to his work. The responsible heads of the several 
engineering departments of the school should be men 
who have had considerable and successful practical ex- 
perience, and they must keep in touch with their pro- 
fession by travel, and by taking occasional professional 
and consulting engagements. This not only keeps 
them fit and fully informed, but it greatly strengthens 
their influence with their students. Their profe.ssional 
work must, however, be completely subordinated to 
their main duty of teaching. There are few professions 
that require more constant and earnest effort, and the 
men who are to guide the final professional studies of 



young engineers must be free from conflicting or divert- 
ing interests. 

The subordinate teachers need not all be experienced 
men, in the sense of having spent many years in works, 
but they should be sufficiently familiar with practice to 
fully appreciate the professional or technical bearing of 
the subjects taught. Practicing engineers should also 
be engaged for occasional special lectures, or short 
courses. If these men are eminent in their profession, 
they will stimulate the students greatly, and will also 
have a good effect on the regular members of the teach- 
ing staff. 



TACTICS AT THE LE ROI MEETING. 

^ A circular letter has been issued to shareholders of the Le Roi 
Company, by Mr. C. Williamson Milne, whose statements .sub- 
stantiate the view we took in last month's issue of the Mining 
Review, regarding the unfair practice that was u.sed by Mr. 
McMillan and his supporters at the recent meeting of his com- 
pany. After referring to the fact that he was unable to obtain 
a hearing at the meeting, in consequence of the opposition of 
McMillan's supporters who appeared to be determined that no 
one except those who were prepared to attack the Board should 
have a patient hearing, Mr. Milne states that although, since 
giving his views with regard to the benefits likely to accrue to 
the Le Roi by amalgamation, he has since heard that a number of 
the present shareholders are opposed to the scheme. He uses 
the words "present shareholders" advisedly, for he states it 
has been an open secret in the city for a long time that certain 
interested parties had been buying for control, and that the nomi- 
nees into whose names the shares were going would vote accord- 
ing to instructions, and against amalgamation. 

The circular states: Some of us should much like a disclaimer 
from Mr. McMillan that he is in any way directly or indirectly 
associated with these astute Americans. The innocent fashion in 
which some of the provincial shareholders have been led to believe 
that there was an organized conspiracy between the Board and 
the representatives of the Canadian 'companies to practically 
"steal" the Le Roi property would be amusing if it were not 
deplorable. 

Mr. McMillan has spoken of various valuations placed upon 
the Canadian Smelting Works, which are owned by the Canadian 
Pacific Railway. These valuations have not differed to any 
extent. In the first instance Mr. McMillan is discussing a price 
provided in a cash option at £120,000, which checks closely 
the valuation made at a later date by John H. Mackenzie viz • 
18 per cent, of £800,000 or £144,000, payable not in cash but 
in shares, and including I understand, all additional plant and 
machinery added after the date of the option referred to as well 
as the Trail concentrator, which Mr. McMillan says cost some 
£60,000. In the second instance, by taking 18 per cent, of 
£1,100,000 (£198,000), Mr. McMiUan is giving you a valuation 
not upon the Trail smelter plant alone, but upon plant, plus 
cash contribution by the Canadian Smelting Works for working 
capital, coke, coal, limestone, stores, and supplies. 

Reference to the valuation by Mr. Mackenzie is made on page 
7 of the director's report as being about £800,000 and distinctly 
states that, instead of distributing £800,000, the value of the 
combined properties and plants, that £1,100,000 is to be "divided 
proportionately". The difference between £1,100,000 and £800,- 
000 was to pay the respective companies for their cash contri- 
bution (working capital) plus coke, coal, limestone, stores and 
supplies, which were to be determined finally by Messrs. Clarkson, 
Cross & Helliwell, chartered accountants and local auditors, 
for all the mining companies, including the Le Roi Mining com- 
pany. This amount of £300,000 would probablv have been 
more than the value of the above, and any balance would have 
been left unissued or distributed proportionately between the 
various companies. 

Mr. McMillan explicitly stated at the meeting that he was 
personally offered £15,000 provided this scheme went through. 
When opportunity offered, I pointed out that a public statement 
of this kind, unsupported by any evidence, left a most monstrous 
imputation on every gentleman who had been connected with 
these negotiations, and that Mr. McMillan was in duty bound to 
disclose the name of the parties who made the offer — but I 
tailed to elicit any response. 

The Centre Star and War Eagle are and have been produc- 
ing about 15,000 tons monthly of ore similar in grade to the 10,000 
of 12,000 tons being produced by the Le Roi, while the St. 
Eugene is mining 12,000 to 15,000 tons monthly from which 
are produced 2,500 to 3,000 tons of lead concentrates of a gross 
value of about £13 per ton. If the Canadian lead bounty were 
cancelled, the St. Eugene could sell every ton of concentrates 
in Europe and net as much as they are at present receiving. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



61 



Mr. Aldridge informs me that the Canadian companies earned 
last year, over and above all expenses, improvements and ocn- 
struction £180,000. They have a cash reserve of £162,000 
earned through operations. 

Throughout the whole of the controversy, Mr. McMillan has 
repeatedly made statements which call for confirmation. The 
proposal to loan a blower (costing when new about £400) to 
Trail smelter, on business terms, advantageous to the I>e Roi 
company, becomes the dismaatling of the Northport smelter 
and a hysterical application is made to the TTnited States courts 
for an injunction. We have six blowers at Northport and have 
seldom \ised more than two and never more than four at the 
same time in the past three vears, so that we could have suffered 
no loss, but stood to gain (if we elected to sell) by this friendly 
act. 

Mr. McMillan complains of vulgar personal abuse aimed at 
him by the directors. I have referred to the circulars issued by 
the board, but they bear no evidence of anything of the sort. 
On the other hand the reference to Mr. Geo. S. Waterlow in 
Mr. McMillan's circulars are, to put it mildly, in the worst 
possible taste, and contain innuendoes that seem to border on 
the libellous. 

Mr. McMillan prepared to recommend the payment of a 
dividend for the year ending June, 1905. By his own showing, 
only last year we were in such desperate straits for working capital 
that the Bank of Montreal asked for the deposit of the title 
deeds to our property. A dividend of only 4 per cent, would 
absorb roughly, £40,000 and we have not got the cash with which 
to pay it. Such cash as we have is urgently needed for working 
capital, but Mr. McMillan would deplete our cash resources as 
cheerfully and recklessly as he has depleted the mine of its ore 
rese^^•es, and again go back to the old policy of "trusting to luck 
and to the clemency of the Bank of Montreal." Such a policy 
is fatuous in the extreme. If luck is with us again it may suc- 
ceed, if otherwise, disaster will follow; but why risk disaster? 

We have a mine in the Le Roi with magnificent possibilities, 
but you must give it a chance by spending considerable sums 
of money on energetic exploration and development work. 

From the "alone I did it" tone of his circulars, one would 
almost infer that Mr. McMillan had at any rate discovered the 
pay ore shoots in the mine, if indeed, he did not place them there. 
He did neither, and he cannot guarantee to keep up the present 
ore shipments for any lengthy period, and at the same time 
increase the payable or? reserves in the mine. 

It seems fair to assume that if returned to power Mr. Mc- 
Millan win at the earliest opportunity restart the Northport 
smelter, notwithstanding the fact, which seems to me to have 
been conclusively proven, that by doing so the Le Roi company 
loses one dollar, at least, on every ton of ore smelted. For years 
past, the Northport smelter has proved a sump for the revenues 
of the Le Roi company. I have applied for and obtained the 
official figures from the" 30th June, 1901, to the 30th June, 1904, 
showing the deficiencies on the Northport smelter, figures, due 
to over-estimation of profits. These deficiencies have only been 
ascertained at the various periods when the Northport smelter 
has been cleaned up. In the aggregate, the difference between 
the estimated valuation of profits and the actual results has 
been no less a sum than £172,000. Either there has been gross 
miscalculation on the part of the smelter managers or" the metal- 
lurgical losses have been enormous. The figures for each year 
are as follows: — 

Deficiency for year ending: — 

June 30, 1901 $250,000 

June 30, 1902 233,000 

June .30, 1903 129,622 

.lune .30, 1904, (say) 250,000 



$862,622 

being equal to £172,524. 

In view of the facts which have been submitted to us with 
reference to the Northport smelter, it would be madness to re- 
turn Mr. McMillan, or his nominees to power without having 
a definite assurance for him and them that the Northport smelter 
will not be reopened. This, it seems to me, is one of the main 
issues of the controversy. 

What, then, are Mr. McMillan's qualifications for the post. 
In his circulars he has made several references to the lack of 
practical knowledge on the part of Sir Henry Tyler and Mr. 
Waterlow. Where and when did Mr. McMillan get his practical 
and technical training in mining and metallurgy? Up till about 
1897 he was emigration officer for the Province of Manitoba. 
Since then he has been a mining broker in Rossland and associa- 
ted with the following companies: 

British Columbia (Rossland and Slocan) Syndicate, Ijimited. 

The Snowshoe Gold and Copper Mining Co., Limited. 

None of the numerous properties owned by these companies, 
so far as I can learn, are operating at a profit to-day in Canada. 
During his tenure of office with the Le Roi he has, despite the 
expressed wishes of its chairman, persisted in sending the Le 



Roi ores to Northport resulting in the reduction of the company's 
profits during the past year alone by a sum of no less than 
£20,000. 

Mr. McMillan has indulged in a number of cheap sneers at 
Messrs. Bradley and Mackenzie, the consulting engineers, who 
have been placed in charge of the Le Roi mine. Mr. Macken- 
zie's policy has never been proved to be wrong; indeed, Mr. 
McMillan has taken credit to himself for results which were large- 
ly due to the directions given by Mr. Mackenzie. Messrs. 
Bradley and Mackenzie are consulting engineers in the western 
states of U.S. to Messrs. Wernher, Beit & Co., and to the Ex- 
ploration Company Limited, of London. These concerns do 
not have the reputation of being content to employ engineers 
who are not in the first rank in their profession. Messrs. Brad- 
ley and Mackenzie are also consulting engineers of the Alaska 
Treadwell, Alaska Mexican, and Alaska Lfnited, three of the 
first mining properties on the American continent. Mr. Bradley 
is president and consulting engineer of the Bunker Hill and 
Sullivan mine in Idaho, the largest silver-lead producing mine 
in the ITnited States. 

It is the advice of men controlling interests such as these 
which Mr. McMillan affects to despise, setting up in opposition 
the views of himself and one or two subordinates appointed by 
him. After the attacks which have been made upon them, there 
is no hope that Messrs. Bradley and Mackenzie will continue, 
even if asked to do so, to operate the Le Roi property, but it is 
interesting to turn for a moment to the comparative expense 
under their regime and that of Mr. McMillan. 

Messrs. Bradley and Mackenzie agreed to act as managers 
and con.sulting engineers for a fee of £1200. With the smelter 
shut down the only additional executive officers whom the 
company would have required to pay were, mine foreman at 
a salary of £600 per annum and a competent office manager at 
a salary of £500— altogether £2300. 

Under Mr. McMillan, his own salary, at one time £2500, 
latterly reduced to £1500. Mr. Astley, mine superintendent, 
received £1600; Mr. Goddell, the .smelter manager, £1600; 
the manager of the Rossland office, £720; and the mine foreman 
£720. The office manager .at Northport £600; bookkeeper at 
Northport £300; and the mine representative at Northport 
(Mr. McMillan's brother), £360; altogether £7400. An object 
lesson, this, in economy! 

Now I wish to put myself right inlone particular. It may 
be remarked that at the meeting of the Le Roi shareholders in 
.January 1905, I said: "I think it is due to Mr. McMillan that 
the .shareholders of this company should expressly thank him 
for the way in which he stood in the breach, when, in Septem- 
ber last he took up the general managership of the company 
on terms which, if the amount is any criterion, indicate a very 
modest scale of remiuieration indeed." 

The .accounts for 1904 showed that Mr. McMillan had re- 
ceived as managing director, in salary and expenses, the sum of 
£625. I never dreamt at that time that Mr. McMillan was likely 
to rate his abilities at £2500 or even £2000 per annum, and I 
would have been just as ready to characterize as monstrous, 
such a scale of remuneration as I was prepared to commend the 
payment of £-500 as a modest fee for his commercial services. 

REMUNERATION OF BOARD. 

T would remind the shareholders that thf present board 
have worked for three years without fee or reward of any kind 
and that if Mr. McMillan's advice is taken and a dividend paid, 
the directors are entitled to participate, and will receive remuner- 
ation for the first time. That they have not recommended a 
dividend is in itself conclusive evidence that their policy has 
not been a personal or a selfish one, but conceived only in the 
interests of the shareholders. 

The only director who has made money out of the company 
during the past three years is Mr. McMillan. Mr. McMillan 
has doubtless worked hard, and done his best according to his 
knowledge and ability, but he has already been handsomely 
paid for any services he may have rendered in the past. 



REPORT OF THE MINING COMMITTEE OF THE 
HALIFAX BOARD OF TRADE. 

The annual meeting of the Halifax Board of Trade was held 
on January 16th. The Mining committee presented the 
following report: — 

Mining has not received the careful consideration, attention 
and support from the members of the committee its magnituda 
and more extensive possibilities would seem to demand. 

When we seriously reflect, it must be apparent that the ocm- 
mercial, economic and political prosperity of this province, and 
particularly the City of Halifax, depends largely upon the suc- 
cessful development of this most important branch of our com- 
mercial life; and further reflections must reveal the necessity 
of a serious and well organized campaign by the members of 



62 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



this board, if we are to broaden and strengthen this corner stone 
01 our commercial foundation. 

It has occurred to me that perhaps in some instances we have 
exerted our energies on subjects minor, and left the major ones 
to shitt for themselves. However, I trust the present year we 
may record a more active and energetic movement by its mem- 
bers in the support of this the most important of our pro- 
vincial natural resources — its mines 

Coal Mining. ^Owing to severity of the weather during the 
winter of 1905 and the re-establishment of the duty on coal 
going into the United States markets, there has not been the 
increase m the production of this commodity as was anticipated 
Many of the mining companies have however, enjoyed a large 
share of prosperity; prices have been successfully maintained 
with no immediate prospects of depreciation in either price or 
output Unfortunately the local consumer does not enjoy the 
same degree of satisfaction— to whom there seems to be no im- 
mediate prospect of relief. It is an open question whether or 
not the present existing conditions are not detrimental to other 
important branches of industries. However, the remedy if 
one IS desired, remains in the hands of the consumer, rather than 
in those of the producer, as is generally supposed. 

In Cape Breton new prospects are being developed on exten- 
sive plans made for larger output in the near future. In the 
Pictou field two new shafts have been sunk, one to the Ford 
the other to the cage pit seam. When these mines are fully 
developed tiiey wiU largely augment the output from the.se 
fields. At DeBert and Maccan satisfactory developments are 
being carried on; while in the western part of Cumberland 
County there is said to be a new and extensive field yet undevel- 
oped, portwns of which are being prospected by the Standard 
Coal and Railway Co., who are said to have already cut a ten- 
foot seam. This field, when fully developed, should add largely 
to the natural resources and \\'ealth of the Province. 

Iron Ore. — Iron ore deposits are receiving more recognition • 
but not as much as we would desire. While the future looks 
extremely encouraging and with proper and suflicient induce- 
ments many promising prospects should develop into fairly 
large proportions. And could the bounty now paid by the 
Dominion Government on metallic iron made in Canada "be so 
apportioned that specific bounty would be paid to the 
producers of Canadian iron ore there would then immediately 
spring into existence a large number of individual mines. 

When we seriously consider that were an export duty to be 
placed upon raw ores now being imported and used by the steel 
plants of this province it would seriously cripple, if not entirely 
destroy these industries, which have cost people so much, makes 
this problem one of extremely vital importance to the people 
of this province, and further shows the wisdom of placing the 
industry in a position absolutely independent of any foreign 
manipulation. The independence of the industry should be 
maintained, but this can only be done by encouraging the de- 
velopment of raw material found within our own Dominion or 
provincial limits. 

I would, therefore, strongly advise the appointment of a 
committee from this Society to more fully consider this question 
in all its branches; that this committee should be instructed 
to place Its finding before the Tariff Revision Commission 
urging the necessity of the re-adjustment of the bounty now 
paid in favor of the producers of native ores. 

The Mining Society of Nova Scotia, already alive to the 
situation, and its importance, have appointed a committee to 
deal with this matter, and a unity of these two committees 
is strongly recommended. 

Prospecting for Oil— During the year 1905 prospecting for 
oil had been continued at or near Cheverie. and, as I understand 
without any discouraging features being met with, and that 
prospecting will be continued during the coming summer. 

Gold Mining.— There has been little or no marked improve- 
ment in this industry during the past year. 

At the suggestion of a committee appointed by the Mining 
Society of Nova Scotia, the local government was induced to 
eniploy an expert engineer to examine into the gold fields of 
this province and to report on the same. This examination has 
been made, and results are anxiously looked for. 

This industry is one of decided importance to the City of 
Halifax, and should receive greater recognition from this Board, 
as the present depressed condition means a loss to the city of not 
less than $500,000 per annum. 

The Mining Society at its next annual meeting will no doubt 
go more fully into the subject and possibly make further recom- 
mendations to the Government, and the co-operation of this 
Board will strengthen their position. 

(Sgd.) A. A. HAYWARD, 

Chairman Mining Com. 

A BANK MANAGER ON MINING IN CANADA. 

At the recent annual meeting of the shareholders of 
the Canadian Bank of Commerce, an interesting report was 



submitted by the general manager. Regarding mining in 
Canada during the past year, reference was first made to 
the gratifying and important industrial fact of the further 
improvement in the conditions surrounding the manu- 
lacture of iron and steel, and particularly the beginning 
ot the manufacture of rails, the excellent quality of which 
was at once demonstrated in the Maritime Provinces In 
Ontario, It was stated interesting mining has been stimulated 
discovery of the rich deposits of silver-cobalt ores in 
the Cobalt area It is stated that several million dollars 
worth of ore will be taken from these veins within the Pmall 
area mentioned. Allusion is made, however, to the refractory 
nature of the ores, but the hope is expressed that before loni 
a satisfactory method of treatment will be available The 
report proceeds to say that during the coming summer there 
wil probably be a considerable influx of population into the 
dLstnct surrounding Cobalt, and signs are not wanting that an 
attempt will be made to create not only a mining, but a mining 
.stock boom. T he report remarks that serious lo.s.ses to the public 
have in the^past resulted from attempts to capitalize mere pros- 
pects which only producing mines should command, and it is 
hoped that no encouragement should be given to any movement 
ot the kind. 

In Saskatchewan and .Alberta, each of which provinces are 
much larger than Manitoba, coal, oil and other natural resources 
are now l)eing developed. 

In British Columbia coal mining shows a handsome increase 
in production, and several new mines are being opened. It is 
stated that there seems to be no reason established in view of 
the unlimited supplies of raw material, whv British Columbia 
should not take its place among the great coal-producing coun- 
tries of the world. 

Copper mining and smelting are now established and profitable 
industries. They require large capital and completed technical 
knowledge, but the results of such a combination seem to be 
as sure as in other well-managed manufacturing busines.ses 
lona-^nAn! ^^^P^t ^.^e Boundaiy mining district is about 
1,000,000 tons. There is a marked improvement in lead and 
silver mining and the outlook seems better than for many years 



ONTARIO MINING INTELLIGENCE. 

From Our Own Correspondent. 

Before the Canadian Section of the Society of Chemical 
Industry, Prof. MiOer recently read a paper on the Mineral 
Deposits at Cobalt. Referring to the richness of Northern On- 
tario he pointed out that nickel of the value of from $50 000 000 
to $60,000,000, in a refined state, had been produced in 'the 
Sudbuiy district. Eastern Ontario was also rich in minerals 
rnica and corundum superior to any in the world being produced 
there. There are three magnetic metals in nature, all of which 
are found m Ontario. The educational system was largelv 
to.blame. Prof. Miller thought, for the slow development of the 
province. He cautioned the people again.st booms— minino- 
on paper. Only 7 per cent, of the mines in the Yukon had paid 
borgreat was the demand for information about the Cobalt 
district that 7,000 maps had been distributed by the Bureau 
of Mines, and 9,000 more had been ordered, 5000" copies of the 
report had been distributed and more were wanted Inquiries 
were coming from all parts of the world. Referring to waste in 
mining. Prof, Miller stated that $3,000 worth of sulphur was 
lost everj^ day at Sudbury in the roast heaps. In the course 
of the evening Prof. Miller exhibited a number of German nickel 
coins and strongly advocated the adoption of a nickel coinage 
for Canada. 

Proceedings have been taken at the instance of the Ontario 
Government to set aside the leases held by the Temiskamino- 
and Hudson's Bay Mining Co., the Nipissing Mining Co., and 
the White Silver Co., on the ground of fraud and misrepresen- 
tation, it being alleged that there was no valuable discovery made 
at the time the leases were applied for. In each case transfers 
have been made, the preaent holders not being the original 
lessees. This complicates the case, the present holders, in 
some cases at teast being innocent parties who obtained mining 
rights for a valuable consideration. 

A branch of the Canadian Mining Institute of Canada has 
been formed at Toronto. Mr. Eugene Coste having been elec- 
ted chairman, Mr. W. Dillon-Mills, secretary, and Mr 
Geo. R. Mickle, treasurer. One of the first acts of the branch will 
be to take up and discuss the proposed changes in the Ontario 
Mining Law. 

The annual meeting of the Canadian Society of Civil Engi- 
neers was held at Toronto, .Ian. 30, 31, Feb. l", 2. The only 
paper bearing directly on mining was one by Dr. j. B. Porter 
of McGill College, on Diamond Mining at Kunberley, South 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



63 



Africa, illustrated with lantern slides. It was full of interest 
and the audience was most appreciative. 

Samples of steel made by the electric process at Deseronto, 
have reached the Bureau of Mines at Toronto, and appear to be 
of excellent quality. They are produced from sulphurous ore 
from the Coe HOI mine and titanium from the Horton mine. 
One sample was produced in 15 and the other in 20 minutes. 
The steel was produced direct from the ores, but the experiments 
were merely conducted on a small scale hy way of laboratory 
test. 

The Canadian Copper Company's new smelter at Copper 
Cliff is now in operation. The cost of the works was approxi- 
mately ■?100,000. The plant,which has a capacity of 10 tons a day, 
is not adapted for saving the cobalt or other constituents of 
the Cobalt ores with the exception of the silver and arsenic. 

A German Syndicate is said to have been formed to explore 
for minerals in Canada on an extensive scale and is said to have 
unlimited capital at its disposal. 

Mr. Controller Jones is our authority for the statement 
that negotiations for the establishment of extensi\'e iron smelt- 
ing works in the east end of Toronto have reached such a stage 
that the works are now practically assured, in order to treat 
Hutton and Temagami ore, which will be delivered on the spot 
by the James Bay and Grand Tnmk railways. 

Judgment has been given by the Court of Appeal for On- 
tario in the case of the Wakefield Mica Co. The liquidator 
appealed from the judgment of Judge Anglin, but the appeal was 
dismissed. Messrs. J. 8. King and C. A. Johnston are held not 
to be contribtitories and that the Mica Co. was never validly 
organized, no meeting of the shareholders or directors ever 
having been held. 

A ver>' valuable discovery of iron ore has been made north- 
east of SudburJ^ The ore is very low in sulphur and phosphorus 
and will make a Bessemer steel of high quality. Railway facili- 
ties will be afforded, it is stated, if the ore proves as valuable 
as is at present believed. 

Messrs. MacKenzie & Mann have secured an option for 
which they are said to have paid $10,000, on a group of iron pro- 
perties in Hutton and vicinity. 

As a way out of the difficulty about the Gillies timber 
limits adjoining Cobalt, Mr. J. M. Clarke, K.C., proposes that 
the mining lands within the limits be handed over to the pro- 
vincial university to provide an endowment. Some Ontario 
papers speak favorably of the proposal, and the university 
authorities are urging the government to act on the suggestion. 

Diamond drill tests on the iron property at the north-east 
angle of Lake Temagami have afforded satisfactory results, and 
it is said offers have since been made for the property which is 
owned by Mr. T. B. Caldwell, M.P., Sir Wm. Mulock and Mr. 
E. O'Connor of Temagami. 

A dispute has arisen over the ownership of the Violet mine 
m the Township of Bucke. The Hon F. Cochrane, Minister 
of Lands and Mines has meanwhile heard the evidence and 
reseri^ed decision. Mr. H. J. M. Rothschild, of New Liskeard, 
is the claimant. The mine has been worked for some months 
by Mr. J. O. Handy, of Pittsburg. 

A United States syndicate has secured an option for, it is 
reported $150,000, on the Tip-top copper mine, situated on the 
line of the Canadian Northern Railway, about 80 miles west of 
Port Arthur. The mine is owned by Lt. Col. Ray. of Port 
Arthur; Folger Bros, of Kingston and some United Sta;tes 
investors. 

An offer of $1,000,000 is understood to have been made for 
the Tretheway mine at Cobalt. Mr. W. G. Tretheway, who 
has the largest interest, was di.sposed to accept, but his partners 
deemed the offer a not sufficiently tempting one. 

Recent tests of the copper pre found at Cloud Bay, near 
Port Arthur, show very satisfactory results, samples having 
yielded as high as 26 per cent. The vein is said to be identical 
with that of the Calumet mine and is 2.3 feet wide in some places. 
A Boston company is meanwhile arranging to work the property 

Mr. Wra. Curtis, who was connected with the Silver Islet 
mine when it was producing heavily, passed through Toronto 
recently on his way from Cobalt where he had been making in- 
vestigations on behalf of Detroit investors. Mr. Curtis expressed 
a very favourable view of what he saw in the new silver district 

The Michipicoten Gold Mining Co. having leased ten claims 
is making arrangements with the Michipicoten Power Co. for 
power for a fifty stamp mill which the company propose to erect. 
The Company's representative is Mr. J. J. Heilmann of Pittsburg. 

Captain Lawson, mine superintendent at Copper Cliff, 
has been promoted to be general manager of the Canadian Copper 
Co's works. 

Edison having secured mining claims on the Montreal 
River, is arranging for the accommodation of the men to be 
employed on the work. 

Companies are announced almost every day to exploit 
Cobalt properties The best properties are not for sale, and 



many of the new concerns have no property, or if they have 
it is not within the mineral belt. There are indications of many 
wild-cat schemes. One advertisement announces that there 
is a vein of calcite on the promoter's property. Probably the 
statement is true, but it is probably intended to' deceive the igno- 
rant who are not aware of the nature of calcite. There is 
every prospect of a great rush to Cobalt in the spring and doubt- 
less wild-catting will be very general. 

The sub-station of the Huronian Power Co. at Copper Cliff 
is nearing completion and power from High Falls was expected 
to be produced on about Feb. 1. The station is built of iron 
and concrete and when completed will have cost over $250,000. 
It will be of great service in furnishing power for mining ' and 
smelting operations. 



COAL NOTES. 



NOVA SCOTIA. 

At a meeting held at Glace Bay on January 22nd, at which 
were present representatives of the Dominion Coal Company 
of the Government and of the P.W.A., the report was submitted 
embodymg the tests made during the past few months, in con- 
nection with the different powders u.sed at the several collieries. 
A decision was finally arrived at that the companies would 
supply Bobbinite and Bull Dog powders, and that the men were 
to be allowed to use which they pleased. In the matter of price 
It was agreed that the company should supply the powder at 
a reduction if the matter can be arranged with the powder 
manufacturers. 

The Dominion Iron & Steel Company's rod mill will be 
closed down for several weeks as the supply of wire rods on hand 
IS at pi-esent greatly in excess of market requirements. Several 
thousand tons of wire is now in storage in the company's ware- 
house, ready for shipment. 

Tests continue to be made of Crow's Nest coal for railway 
purposes, some recent results having proved most satisfactory 
in competition with other western coals; thus, a test made by 
the engineers of the Northern Pacific Railway yielded the follow- 
ing results: — 

Pounds of water evaporated per pound coal at feed tem- 
perature, 33 degrees F., 8.1. 

Pounds water evaporated per pound coal from and at 212 
F., 9.95. 

Pounds coal burned per 1,000-ton-mile on up grade of 0 25 
per cent, for 115 miles, 120.19. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

It is reported in consequence of the present increased 
demand for coal lands in Alberta and Saskatchewan and in 
t;he B.C. Railway belt, that the Department of the Interior has 
decided in future that if the first instalment of the purchase 
price IS not paid before the expiiy of the period allowed an ap- 
plicant when an application is accepted by the department, his 
right under the application will be held to have absolutely lapsed. 
When payments have been made on account the rule will be 
on and after April 1st next, that if the payments are not made 
on the date fixed by the terms of sale, the rights of the purchasers 
will be forfeited. If a purchaser does not wish to complete 
the payment on the whole of the tract covered by his application 
and he so notifies the department before the 1st of April next 
he may be permitted to apply the amount which he has paid 
on the whole tract to a portion thereof, in such a way that his 
amount may complete the purchase of such lesser portion of 
the original tract. 

It is reported that the well known railway magnate, Mr. 
D C. Corbin, and others, have recently completed the purchase 
of 17 square miles of coal lands in the Crow's Nest area some 
60 miles east of Fernie, and adjoining the C.P.R. coal lands 

In his annual report for 1905, J. W. Harrison, broker of 
San Francisco, reports the consumption of coal during this period 
m that market as having been 219,182 tons less than that of 
the preceding year. The report states that this shrinkage 
must not be taken as an indication that our fuel requirements 
have been at all less than in 1904. The apparent diminished 
quantity of coal fuel has been much more than made good 
by an output this year of fully three million barrels of fuel oil 
m excess of last year. The quantity of coal shipped here from 
British Columbia is in excess of last year shipments, whereas 
the Australian amount has shrunk fully 40 per cent A new 
feature has recently developed itself in colonial deliveries beino- 
made here by steamers, there are several already chartered 
which have yet to arrive, with fi-eight at about 16 shillings per 
ton, and with the duty of 67 cents per ton, the importers receive 
a very small compensation for coal; less than one-half the amount 
demanded for British Columbia coal at port of shipment. 

The quotations of coal of all grades have ruled very uniform- 
ly throughout the year, the prices of steam grades have favored 



64 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



buyers having fuel oil for a close competitor. The labor dis- 
turbances in British Columbia, which lasted for about six months 
this year, served to diminish the importations from Nanaimo 
section, and helped to increase the colonial importations, both 
as to quantity and price. Favorable terms were reached in 
November last, and work has been recommenced, and is now 
running harmoniously. About 80 per cent, of the coal trade 
is under the control and supervision of one firm locally. This 
is found to work with advantage to the buyers, and the sellers 
as the material can be handled so much more economically, 
and prices are sustained more unformly. There are six 
steamers now being utilized by the firm transporting coal from 
British Columbia only. The last deliveries here of the six 
steamers amounted to over 24,000 tons, partially for steam 
purposes, and partially domestic grades. 

The following comparative table shows the origin and 
tonnage of coal delivered in San Francisco during the past three 
years: — 

1903 1904 1905 

Tons Tons Tons 

British Columbia 289,890 335,137 348,515 

Australia 276,186 148,409 85,031 

English and Welsh 61,580 64,664 65,087 

Scotch 3,495 1,666 None 

Eastern (Cumberland and An- 
thracite 13,262 29,055 11,663 

Seattle (Washington) 127,819 139,063 84,965 

Tacoma (Washington) 256,826 182,313 81,480 

Mount Diablo, Coos Bay and 

Tesla- 84,277 96,520 114,930 

Japan, and Rocky Mountain by 

rail 102,219 54,245 40,219 

Total 1,215,554 1,051,072 831,890 



REPORTS AND MEETINGS. 

Le Roi No. 2, Limited. — At a meeting of this company, 
held on the 15th of January, a report was submitted showing 
a balance to credit of profit and loss account of £29,810, after 
writing off the sum of £13,911 against mine development and 
£3,924 as depreciation on machinery and plant, buildings, etc. 
There was brought forward from the previous year the sum of 
£28,690, and after paying a final dividend for 1904 of 2s. per 
share there remained the sum of £16,090, which with the present 
balance of £29,810, gives a total of £45,901 available for distri- 
bution. Ovit of this a dividend of Is. per share was paid on the 
7th of October, absorbing £6,300. The directors now recommend 
a final distribution for 1905 of 3s. per share, leaving £20,701 to 
be carried forward. Messrs. Hill and Stewart report that during 
the past year the development of the mine has been vigorously 
pushed with highly sati.sfactory results, 12,237 tons were shipped 
to the smelter, and 10,678 tons to the concentrator. The mining 
expenses for the year, including diamond drilling, show an ex- 
penditure of .14.22 per ton as compared with $4.45 the previous 
year, although the tonnage dealt with has been less. The com- 
pany has taken advantage of an opportunity that occurred to 
acquire various claims in the Rossland and Ymir districts, but 
has relinquished the option over the Vernon-Thompson group. 
Mr. Couldrey, who occupied the post of mine manager during 
the years 1903-4, has now returned to Rossland and taken 
charge of the property. 

Denoro Mines, Limited, (Rossland). — Mr. Smith Curtis, 
managing director, has Lssued the following circular to sharehol- 
ders: — 

Since the last annual meeting, mostly development work 
has been carried on at the Oro Denoro mine. Sufficient ore has 
been taken out to meet the expense of mining, etc., so that the 
financial position of the company continues to be sound. The 
work of exploration carried on at various places on the property 
has shown that there is a reasonable certainty of a large tonnage 
of ore of at least as good grade as that being shipped by the 
Big Boundary Copper Mines to smelters operated in conjunction 
with such mines. Were there a Custom Smelter buying such 
ores the Oro Denoro could maintain a large output. As it is 
now, it is only ores of special quality that the smelters will take 
from the Oro Denoro. 

A large body of ore was last summer and fall stripped of a 
deep layer of earth so as to permit its being quarried. This 
ore lies on the hillside between the two railway lines crossing 
the property and was ready for mining early in November but 
the Great Northern Railway failed to observe its contract with 
your company and complete a shipping siding until a few days 
ago when the siding was at last finished and since then 800 tons 
have been sent to the (iranby smelter and other shipments are 
uruUu' way. 

It is too soon to tell how this ore body will turn out in values, 



but it is believed to be payable at the rates quoted by the smelter. 
If so regular shipments will be made from it. 

Two months ago arrangements were made to acquire a 
half interest in the Hungry Man mine situate three and one- 
half miles from Slocan Junction, a station on the C.P.R. branch 
line between Nelson and Castlegar. One-fourth of this mine 
has been bought and paid for. The development work to date 
has been fully up to expectations and a payable ore body has 
been followed down 33 feet. A steam hoist and pump have 
been installed and will enable work to be done more cheaply 
and expediously. The ore is pyrrhotite carrying an average 
of about $20 in gold. As this interest at the present time seems 
likely to become a valuable asset of your company, the annual 
meeting will not be held until some time in February when it 
will be possible to give more certain information about it. 

Skylakk Developing Company, (Boundary District). — 
The annual meeting of this company was held in Phoenix, during 
January, the directors being re-elected as follows: The president, 
Mr. A. B. W. Hodges, vice-president, Mr. R. B. Boucher, M.D.; 
directors, Messrs. H. A. Wright, C. D. Hunter, W. S. Macy. 
Mr. A. B. Hood was re-elected secretary-treasurer, and Mr. 
O. B. Smith, junior manager. The report of the manager, for 
the year, was of a favourable character. The development 
work done comprised 1,071 feet, and 535 J tons of ore were mined 
and shipped to the Granby and Nelson smelters. At the 150 
ft. level the ore body was again found to be faulted, but by cros- 
cutting to the east a very short distance, the vein was found 
again in place. The difTiculty of determining the amount of 
ore now in sight is pointed out in the report. An estimate of 
490 tons of high grade ore is presented as a very conservati\'(' 
calculation. 



MINING NOTES. 



NOVA SCOTIA. 

A very remarkable showing was made during the month of 
December by the Dominion Iron & Steel Company, all previous 
records in every department having been surpassed, and a new 
record established, particularly in the output of wire rod. 

The total production of pig iron last year was 162,000 tons, 
of the open hearth steel furnaces 173,500 tons, and of the rolling 
mills 47,000 tons. The steel rail mill turned out from the time 
it was first operated in June 44,000 tons. These were all 80- 
pound rails of uniformly good quality and practically all were 
delivered against contracts. Shipments were made under rigid 
inspection to the leading railroads of the Dominion and contracts 
are now in hand which will absorb the output of the mill for some 
months. The monthly production gradually increased until 
the end of the year, December having nearly 10,000 tons to its 
credit. This is not the measure of the mill's capacity, over 
600 tons having been rolled on a single day and on .several oc- 
casions it was proved that it is po.ssible to roll 1,000 tons a day. 

It is believed that upon the return of the President, Mr. 
Plummer, from England, the company will be re-organized and 
placed on a better financial footing 

The company is now confronted with the following charges 
in round figures: — 

First mortgage bonds $390,000 

Second mortgage bonds 150,000 

Sinking funds, first mortgage 55,000 

Sinking fund, second mortgage ....... 250,000 

Total $845,000 

The preferred dividend requires $350,000, making a total 
of $1,195,000 of obligations ahead of the common stock. The 
company must thus earn $100,000 a month from operation to 
pay interest, sinking fund and preferred dividend requirements. 
The accumulated dividends on the preferred stock including 
the April dividend will amount to $21 per share, or $1,050,000. 
There is also the floating debt to be taken into consideration. 
The general understanding is that under the re-organization plan 
the second mortgage bonds will be retired by the issue of another 
security, the preferred stockholders will be asked to agree to 
having their shares put on an 8% basis, thus receiving back 
dividends at the rate of 1% per annum. With the retirement 
of the second mortgage bonds and the removal of the $250,000 
required for the sinking fund for that issue, the increased pro- 
duction possible, the excellent business in prospect, a brighter 
day should be dawning for the long suffering holders of Dominion 
Iron & Steel common, and the shares have even now started to 
reflect the good news which is coming from the property. 

Shipments from the Dominion Steel Company's works, 
during January, aggregated approximately 17,000 tons. 

QUEBEC. 

In an article headed "Exit the Anglo Canadian" the Buck- 
ingham Press comments in the following anmsing fashion: — 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



65 



"There was not a fire at the premises of the Anglo-Canadian 
Graphite Syndicate, Limited, recently, but some people saw 
Sparks. The sale in connection with the company then took 
place, and the movables were disposed of. The result of the 
sale is not verj' encouraging for the creditors. The liabilities 
foot up something like $8,000.00 (eight thousand dollars) and 
the proceeds of the sale, gross we mean, come to about $750.00 
(seven hundred and fifty small dollars). Out of this sum will 
come the law costs and advertising, and the fees of the permanent 
liquidator. Less than 10 per cent, of the liabilities has been 
realized at this sale, 90 per cent, of which will go to satisfy 
privileged claims unless we are greatly mistaken. Over 600 cords 
of mixed wood went for a lump sum equivalent to 25 cents per 
cord. Four tons of steel rails with fish plates and bolts went 
for the sum of 8 dollars. One steam drill brought $70, another 
$5. There was a slight hope until the sale came off that opera- 
tions would be resumed here by a new company of which Messrs. 
W. E. Duncan and Darcy McMahon were to be managing direc- 
tors. But though Mr. Duncan was at the sale he did not pur- 
chase anything. The buying of the wood by him would have 
afforded grovmd for the assumption that operations would be 
resumed, but as it appears to-day the Carbondale business seems 
as dead as the proverbial door nail, snuffed out like a tallow 
candle. But perhaps McMahon and Duncan have something 
up their sleeves, not of the hair raising kind, but something all 
wool and a yard wide, don't you know. We hope so any way. 

There is not much hope of the Weart mill resuming opera- 
tions. If the International Company had really intended to 
re-open this mine it is quite likely the 600 odd cords of wood 
disposed of would not have gone for the price it did, but as a 
distinguished friend of ours says, "You can't mostly always 
generally sometimes tell." 

ONTARIO. 

The Big Master mine, after running, has again been obliged 
to close down, the recent clean-ups apparently having not 
been sufficient to more than defray expenses. The statements 
that have recently appeared regarding the value of the clean- 
ups made were, morover, doubtless exaggerated. 

Five hundred and fifty oil leases in South Essex were filed 
in the county registrar's office during the year. The value of 
these leases is given as $1,318,179.00. 

The concrete foundations for the Atikokan Ore Company's 
blast furnaces, to be erected at Port Arthur, have been com- 
pleted and contracts for steel structural work and machinery 
have been let, the work being divided into fourteen contracts. 
The Canada Foundrj- Company, of Toronto, has secured $200,000 
worth of the work; Canada Bridge Co. $100,000 and Caledonia 
Iron Works, Montreal, $20,000. The remainder of the contracts 
went to United States firms, and were for machinery not 
made in Canada. If contractors finish their work on time the 
company will start furnaces going next August. The mine at 
Atikokan is being equipped with the best machinery obtainable 
and the shipping of ore therefrom will begin as soon as naviga- 
tion is open. A railway six miles long from 'the Canadian 
Northern main line to the mine will be constructed at once. 
The authorized capital stock of this company is $2,000,000. 

A local paper publishes the following interesting note, re- 
garding the alleged blanketting of claims in the Cobalt'district: — 

A sensational move by the Attorney General, Mr. Foy, to 
open up a large area of the Cobalt district, which it is claimed 
has been illegally " blanketted," was inaugurated on Saturday 
when Wm. Pinkerton, of Pinkerton, Clute & Co., issued the first 
instalment of writs on a wholesale scale. By noon 50 writs 
were issued at Osgoode Hall, and by Monday morning 100 more 
were issued. It is asserted that fully half of the Cobalt district 
is affected by the action taken and that the property could be 
easily sold to-day for $10,000,000. The action is the result of 
representations made to the Government by miners and pros- 
pectors concerning holdings of Temiskaming and Hudson Bay 
Mining Co., Ltd., a company organized and incorporated during 
the final months of the Ross government. Under its charter 
it was empowered to locate 640 acres of land for purposes of 
development. It is alleged that not only was this allotment 
taken up, but that 11 men who constituted original shareholders 
also took up all claims possible, and that each then made a dec- 
laration of trust handing over these claims to the company and 
thus making a breach of the mining laws. 

The Lake Superior Corporation's steel rail mill is now run- 
ning at full capacity, there being a large number of orders ahead. 
It is stated that possibly this year arrangements will be made 
for the construction of a large coke plant and the installation 
of open-hearth furnaces. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Nelson. — While some inconvenience has resulted from the 
recent fire at the Ymir mine, operations both at the mine and 
mill have been carried on uninterruptedly. At the mine develop- 
ment is under way to the west of the main shaft on the 500, 600, 



700 and 1,000 ft. levels, and it is reported that important new 
discoveries of ore are being made. 

A new furnace described as the Blanchard, after its Seattle 
inventor, has been installed at the Pilot Bay smelter, the pre- 
liminary experiments on Blue Bell ore having given entire 
satisfaction. 

It is expected that the new mill under construction at the 
La Plata mines will be in readiness to commence operations 
within the next two or three months. The mine is meanwhile 
shipping ore regularly to the Hall mine smelter, at the rate of 
about 10 carloads a month. 

East Kootenay. — The St. Eugene Consolidated Mining 
Company, Limited, paid, during the month, a seventh dividend 
of 2 per cent. This company has now paid to date, in the form 
of dividends, $560,000.00. The mine and concentrating mill 
are now in active operation. About 90 tons of concentrates 
a day are being sent to the Canadian Smelting Works at Trail. 

Cariboo. — In an interview with the Victoria Times Mr. 
H, Jones, M.P.P., Cariboo District, is reported to have stated 
that prospects at the present in that district are extremelv 
encouraging, and that there is a likelihood of gradually increased 
activity in and about the Cariboo mines during the coming season, 
Hitherto the work done has been largely of a prospecting nature, 
but the big companies, after sinking to the necessary depths, 
are striking out for the deep channels where heavy deposits of 
gold are believed to e.xist. Already in .some cases these tunnels 
or drifts extend underneath the Willow river, through a stratum 
of deposit about 100 feet thick between the present and the an- 
cient bed of the river. The nature and extent of the preliminary 
work may be gathered from the fact that the minimum depth 
of shaft required for workings of this kind is 100 feet. There are 
at present about seven big companies working, in addition to 
numerous prospecting ventures, hydraulicing concerns and in- 
dividual diggers, and the quantity of gold taken out, chiefly by 
the latter, amounted to some $350,000 in value during the past 
season. This return would have been largely increased but for 
the serious shortage of water consequent upon an exceptionally 
dry season. 

It is reported that better pay has been struck at the Cariboo 
Consolidated La Fontain mine, gravel running 9 oz. and upwards 
to the sett. 

Boundary. — The second furnace of the Dominion Copper 
Company's smelter at Boundary Falls was blown in during the 
month. Shipments from this company's mines have also been 
considerably increased. 

The Boundary Iron Works, Limited has declared a first 
dividend of 5 per cent, payable on the Isf^of March. It is 
stated that the business of this foundry has grown enormously 
during the last few months. 

The strike of smelter employees of the B.C. Copper Company 
and the Dominion Copper Company, at the beginning of January 
was, fortunately, short lived, and" as the result of conferences 
between the officials and the men the matter in dispute was 
amicably arranged on the basis of an 8 hour day. The men 
had asked to be paid the same rate for an 8 hour day as for one 
of 12 hours. However a new schedule was arrived at, by which 
the coke wheelers and charge wheelers are to receive $2.70 a 
day and tappers and pot dumpers $3.00. 

Slogan. — The Kaslo Kootenaian remarks editorially that 
much adverse comment has been occasioned recently anent the 
excessive freight charges on zinc ores between Sandon and 
Kaslo. Some of the shippers maintain that hitherto the rate 
has been only $1 per ton to Kaslo and are much incensed over 
the new rate, claiming that the Great Northern in levying such 
charges are attempting to divert the ore to the United States 
smelters for the purpose of securing the long haul over their 
own lines. On the other hand the local railroad people deny 
this and further maintain that there never was a tariff rate 
of $1 per ton from Sandon to Kaslo. The rates have always been 
the same — $2.50 per ton — between Sandon and Nelson and all 
mtermediate points. Mr. H. M. Adams, of the Freight Depart- 
ment staff of the Great Northern, meanwhile has stated that rates 
on ore on the K. & S. Road have never, to his knowledge, been 
advanced. The present rate of $2.50 per ton in carload lots to 
Pilot Bay and Nelson being the lowest rate that has ever been 
in effect. 

RossLAND.— A suitable plant has been purchased for use 
m operatmg the Copper Valley mine, situated on Big Sheep Creek 
m the vicmity of Velvet-Portland. It is proposed to actively 
develop the property. It is reported by the Rossland Miner 
that the St. Paul mme, one of the early discoveries in the district 
and operated by a company, has been purchased by Mr. W. R. 
Brock, of Toronto, with the possible intention of re-organizing 
the ongmal company and resuming work. The St. Paul claim is 
situated on the northern slope of Deer Park Mountain, immedi- 
ately west of the White Bear. 

Notice is given in the British Columbia Gazette of the incor- 
poration of the White Bear Mining Co., Ltd., with a capital of 



66 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



one million dollars in shares of 10 cents each. The company is 
specially limited under section 56 of the companies act. The 
object of incorporation is to take over the property and business 
of the White Bear mine in this city and to acquire all the prop- 
erty and rights necessary to the operation thereof. 

The Coast.— The Government. Agent at Texada Lsland 
reports that the Marble Bay Company last year shipped 12,000 
tons of ore. The mine has been developed to a depth of 671 
feet, the .shaft having been deepened at 100 feet, in addition to 
which 340 feet of drifting was done and 200 feet of other develop- 
ment work. The company reports that the gold values in the 
ore have been maintained, and that the copper values have some- 
what increased. 

Operations were started at the Crofton smelter on the 
4th of January, and a shipment of blister copper has already been 
made to New Jersey. The briquetting plant has been installed 
and the works are now in full running order and treating ore, 
not only from the company's own property at Howe Sound^ 
but from Prince of Wales Island, and from Mullen, Idaho. 

YUKON. 

Dredging possibilities on the Hootalinqua have lately been 
attracting some attention, and it is learned that Boston capital 
has become interested in the exploitation of the field. 

The Yukon WorM, in a recent article, refers to the success 
achieved by the individual miner on Barker Creek, situated 27 
miles before Stewart Crossing. The creek, which has only re- 
cently been exploited, is 35 miles long, pay having been found 
15 miles from the mouth. On the discovery claim the width 
of the stream is from 500 to 1,500 feet. It is" stated that at pre- 
sent 25 men are working claims here and in .some cases are earning 
from .$8.00 to $10.00 a day. The ground is shallow, being from 
14 to 16 feet deep, the gravel having a brownish color, similar 
to that given by iron stain. The benches in the vicinity are 
said to be most promising. 



MINING MEN AND AFFAIRS. 

Mr. S. F. Parrish, formerly manager of the Le Roi mine 
at Rossland, is now residing at La JoUa, California, where he has 
assumed the management of an important property. 

Mr. John Y. Cole, of Rossland, who for the past 12 years 
has been engaged in mining in different Kootenay districts, 
has left British Columbia, and proposes establishing himself at 
Cobalt, Ont, 

Mr. J. B. Tyrrell, the well known inining engineer of Dawson, 
Y.T., is spending the winter months in Ottawa, his address there 
being 266 McLaren Street. 

A short but useful course on mining instruction has recently 
been provided by the University of the State of Washington, 
Seattle, lasting three months. The studies include geology, 
mineralogy, assaying, chemistry, mining and milling, and the 
mining laws of the United States, British Columbia and Alaska. 
No charge is made for tuition, except in the assaying and chemis- 
try course. 

Mr. S. S. Fowler, of Nelson, accompanied by Mrs. Fowler, 
is spending the winter months in California. 

Mr. Paul S. Couldrey, manager of the Le Roi No. 2, recently 
at the request of the company examined the property of the 
Velvet-Portland Mines, Ltd., preliminary, it is conjectured, 
to the resumption of operations at these mines. 

The Canadian Mining Review has been informed by the 
secretary of the Exhibition branch of the Department of Agri- 
culture that it has been awarded a diploma of the Gold Medal 
class for its exhibit at the St. Louis World's Fair, 1904. 

Mr. M. Gintzberger, manager of the Monitor and Ajax 
Fraction mines at McGuigan, has had the misfortune to break 
a leg. We learn, however, that he is rapidly recovering from 
the accident. 

We regret to record the death, which occurred recently, 
of Mr. E. J. Thain, who for some time past has acted as Govern- 
ment Mining Recorder at Atlin. 

Dr. H. A. Young, M.P.P. for the Atlin District, in a recent 
interview stated that while a shortage of water last year neces- 
sarily reduced the production of the district, nevertheless thinks 
the yield will probably aggregate .1600,000.00. He furthermore 
expressed the opinion that the development of the Windy Arm 
mines will have the beneficial effect of attracting more attention 
to mining in the northern territory. Dr. Young further stated 
that individual miners are still doing well in Atlin, the past 
season having been an exceptionally good one, so far as this 
class was concerned. At the present time about 300 men are 
engaged in drifting work, and the clean-ups will take place in 
the spring. 

Mr. J. Obalski is to be congratulated on having been appoin- 
ted Director of Miii(!s for the Province of Quebec, and also 
Superintendent of Mines, with a corresponding increase of salary. 

Mr. James Crease, manager of a gold mine at Mount Uniacke, 
N.S., was very near the vict im of a murderous assault last month^ 



having been shot at on his way to the property. Shortly before 
Mr. Crea.se had received anonymous letters warning him to leave 
the neighborhood or suffer the consequences, and notices had been 
posted in the district threatening the employees at this property 
to cease work. The matter is being investigated by the Nova 
Scotian authorities. 

Mr. G. C. Bateman, who last year graduated from the King- 
.ston School of Mining, has received an excellent appointment 
at Copper Cliff'. 

J ^' ^' Brigstocke, Manager of the Drummond Mines 
Ltd^ Haileybury, w;is married last month to Mi.ss loraine Leslie' 
of King.ston. ' 

Mr. J. C. Drewry, one of the directors of the St. Eugene 
and managing director of the Canadian Gold Fields syndicate' 
spent .some days in Montreal last month. - He speaks very hope- 
fully of the mimediate future of mining in British Columbia. 

Mr. G. H. Duggan has been appointed second vice-president 
of the Dominion Coal Company. 

We extend most hearty congratulations to Dr. F. D. Adams 
Logan Professor of Geology, McGill University, who, in recogni- 
tion of his notable services, established in connection with the 
science he represents, has been awarded by the Geological Society 
of London, the Lyell medal. This medal was also awarded in 
1881 to Dr. Adams' distinguished predecessor. Sir Wm. Daw.son. 

We have received a communication from the Secretary of 
the Iron & Steel Institute, 28 Victoria Street, London, England, 
stating that a research scholarship or scholarships, of .such value 
as may appear expedient to the council of the institute from time 
to time founded by Mr. Andrew Carnegie (Past-President) 
who has presented to the Iron and Steel Institute eighty-nine 
one-thousand dollar 5 per cent, debenture bonds for the purpose, 
will be awarded annually, irrespective of sex or nationality, on 
the recommendation of the council of the institute. Candid'ates 
who must be under thirty-five years of age, must apply on a 
special form before the end of February to the secretary" of the 
institute. 

The object of this scheme of scholarships is not to facilitate 
ordinary collegiate studies, but to enable students, who have 
passed through a college curriculum or have been trained in 
industrial establishments, to conduct researches in the metallurgy 
of iron and steel and allied subjects, with the view of aiding its 
advance or its application to industry. There is no restriction 
as to the place of research which may be selected, whether 
university, technical school, or works, provided it be properly 
equipped for the pro.secution of metallurgical investigations. 

The appointment to a scholarship shall be for one year, but 
the council may at their discretion renew the scholarship for a 
further period instead of proceeding to a new election. The 
results of the research shall be communicated to the Iron and 
Steel Institute in the form of a paper to be submitted to the 
annual general meeting of members, and if the council consider 
the paper to be of sufficient merit, the Andrew Carnegie gold 
medal shall be awarded to its author. Should the paper in any 
year not be of sufficient merit, the medal will not be awarded in 
that year. 



COMPANY NOTES. 



British Columbia Copper. — The annual general meeting 
of this company will be held in Charleston, W. Va., on Feb. 13th. 
The books were closed on Jan. 23rd, and will be re-opened on 
Feb. 17th. 

Tyee Copper Company. — During December the smelter 
ran 11 days and treated 2,035 tons of Tyee ore giving a return 
after deduction of freight and refining charges, of .$33,460.10 

Crow's Ne.st Pass Coal.— It is rumored that the directors 
of this company are contemplating proposing to the shareholders 
at the annual meeting next month the issue of bonds bearing 
interest of 5% in connection with a reorganization plan. It 
is not clear why this should be necessary. 

Le Roi. — Shipments for last month amounted to 6925 tons 
containing 2772 ounces of gold, 5300 ounces of silver, 205,700 
pounds of copper. Estimated profit on this ore, after deducting 
cost of mining, smelting realization and depreciation, $32,500. 
Expenditure on development work during the month, .118,000. 



MINING CORPORATIONS. 

ONTARIO. 

New York and Ontario Mining Company, Limited. — Capital 
$40,000.00, in shares of $100.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. 
Provisional Directors, Messrs. Geo. Reginald Geary, Fitzgerald 
Douglas Byers and Oscar Frederick Taylor. 

The Dwyer Mining Company, Ltd.— Capital, $100,000.00, 
in shares of .$5.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Provisional 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



67 



Directors, Messrs. John Brush LeRoy, Daniel Robert Dwyer 
and John Russell Humphreys. 

Vermilion River Iron Ore Company, Limited: — Capital, 
§80,000.00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. 
Provisional Directors, Messrs. Frank Denton, John Walter Mc- 
Donald and Ella A. Francis. 

Wendigo Progressive Mining & Development Company, 
Ltd.— Capital, $40,000.00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, 
New Liskeard, Ont. Provisional Directors, Messrs. John Cox, 
Samuel Drew Eplett, Geo. Wm. Slade, John Wesley Foreman 
and John McFarlane. 

DjTOond Development Company, Ltd. — Capital, $250,000, 
in shares of $100.00 each. Head Office, Ottawa. Provisional 
Directors, Messrs. Chas. Wilson Farran Gorrell, Adam Tozeland 
Shillington, Bion Joseph Arnold, Wayland Lloyd Arnold and 
Ralph Glenroy Arnold. 

Northern Ontario Copper Company, Ltd. — Capital, $500,000.- 
00 in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Sault Ste. Marie. Pro- 
visional Directors, Messrs. John Angus Montague, Ozias Byron 
Jury, Uriah McFadden, Wimmiam Edwin Gimby and Arthur 
Cyril Boyce. 

Croesus Mining Company, Limited. — Capital $500,000.00, 
in shares of $100.00 each. Head Office, Ottawa. Provisional 
Directors, Messrs. Shirley Ogilvie, Douglas L. McGibbon and 
Travers Lewis. 

Clarks Standard Developing Co., Limited. — Capital $40,- 
000.00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, New Liskeard. 
Provisional Directors, Messrs. John Jeffery GriUs, Thos. Clark, 
Robert B. Herron, William Votier Cragg and James Leitch 
Brown. 

Canadian Cobalt and Silver Mining Company, Limited. — • 
Capital, $250,000.00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, 
Ottawa. Provisional Directors, Messrs. Thos. Birkett, Alphonse 
Antoine Taillon, Thomas Lindsay, Herman Humphrey Lang, 
William Drummond Hogg, Wm. Frederick Powell, Douglas 
Macnair and Robert Taylor Shillington. 

Abitibi Mining & Developing Company, Ltd. — Capital 
$100,000.00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Finch, Ont. 
Provisional Directors, Eathen Henrj- Marcellus, John McLaugh- 
lin, Jno. J. McMillan, James Currie, Colin Smith Nesbitt, Her- 
bert Eardley Bingham, Duncan Alexander McNaughton. 

The Terrill Cobalt Mining Co., Limited.— Capital $100,000.00, 
in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Sault Ste. Marie. Pro- 
visional Directors, William Edwin Gimby, Geo. Woolrich, 
David Irvine Millar, Henry H. Taylor, Wesley Burns Moore- 
house, Alexander Mclntyre, Frederick Rogers, Abraham Geo. 
TerriU and Robert Henry Schultz. 

Empire Construction Companv, Limited. — Capital $1,000,- 
000.00, in shares of $100.00 each. Head Office, Montreal. 
Provisional Directors, Vicomte Louis Charliers de Buisseret, 
gentleman; Eugene Fichefet, contractor; Baron Constant Gof- 
finet, minister plenipotentiary; Louis Goffin, engineer; Louis 
Grenier, engineer; Gerard Macquet, engineer; C omte John 
d'Oultremont, (Grand Marechal de la Cour), Armand Rouffart 
engineer; Edmond Rouffart, doctor of medicine, aU of Brussels, 
Belgium, except Louis Grenier, who resides at Ghent, Belgium, 
and Louis Charliers de Buisseret, who resides at SenefTe, Belgium; 
James B. Tudhope, Orillia, Ont.; Henry W. Fleury, Aurora, 
Ont.; Paul Galibert, merchant, and Thomas Gauthier, accoun- 
tant, both of Montreal. 

Canadian Consolidated Mines, Limited. — Capital $5,500,000.- 
00, in shares of $100.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Provisional 
Directors, Messrs. Henry Smith Osier, barrister-at-law; William 
Beardsley Raymond, barrister-at-law, Frank Ford, barrister-at- 
law; Geo. Chas. Loveys Loveys, accountant, William Wellington 
Livingston, student-at-law; James Miller Ewing, accountant, 
and Britton Osier, sohcitor, all of Toronto ,Ont. 

The Abittibi Mining Company, Ltd. — Capital, $10,000.00. 
in shares of $100.00 each. Head Office, Montreal. 

Temagami Silver Mining Company, Ltd. — Capital $150,000.- 
00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Sturgeon Falls, Ont. 
Pro\asional Directors, Messrs. Geo. Gordon, Jesse Bradford, 
Alex. Burton Gordon, Thos. Urquhart, Jeremiah Daniel Cock- 
burn, Chauncey Thos. Kirby and Geo. Phillip Cockburn. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Crescent Mines, Ltd. — Capital, $1,000,000.00 in shares of 
$1.00 each. 

White Bear Mining Company,Limited. — Capital, $1,000,000.- 
00, in shares of 10 cents each. 

The Norma Mines, Limited.— Capital $300,000.00, in shares 
of $1.00 each. 



the larger quantity being areas that had expired and had been 
re-applied for. 

The following is a statement of the numbers of areas applied 
for and district: — 

Areas 

Oldham 48 

Meteghan 30 

Cow Bay 6 

Chezzettcook 16 

Renfrew 9 

Montague 48 

Antrim 6 

Millers Lake 22 

Stormont 13 

Fifteen Mile Stream 89 

Scraggy Lake 11 

Malaga Barrens 6 

Lochaber 39 

Wagamatkook 14 

Whitebum 2 

Gold River 12 

Beaver Dam 10 

Harrigan Cove 4 

Total 385 

The latest mill returns to hand, give tonnage and yield as 
follows: — Frederick Taylor mill, Oldham, during Oct., Nov. and 
Dec, 1905 crushed 531 tons, which yielded 547 oz. 0 dwt. 0 grs. 

At the Philadelphia mill, North Brookfield, 350 tons crushed 
in November yielded 142 oz. 15 dwt. 0 grs. and in December 
162J tons crushed yielded 75 oz. 15 dwt. 0 grs. gold. 

In the Stormont district the McCawley mill crushed 397 
tons during Oct., Nov., and Dec. and the yield of gold therefrom 
was 370 oz. 10 dwt. 0 grs. and in same district 392 tons were 
crushed at the MacKeen mill and yielded 165 oz. 18 dwt. 20 grs. 
gold. 

At the J. A. Crease mill Mount Uniacke 35 tons were crushed 
during Dec. which yielded 71 oz. 5 dwt. 0 grs 



LAST YEAR'S PRODUCTION OF PIG IRON. 



During the year 1905 a considerable advance was made in iron 
and steel output in nearly all the producing countries. This is 
shown by the following comparative table giving the production 
of pig iron in the respective countries in thousands of tons: — 

1905 1904 

United States 23,000 16,497 

Germany 11,000 10,058 

Great Britain 9,500 8,563 

Belgium 1,400 1,283 

France 3,200 3,000 

Russia 3,500 2,978 

Austria Hungary 1,500 1,480 

Sweden 600 529 

Canada 420 295 

Other countries 600 500 

Totals 54,720 45,183 

It is probable that this is the greatest advance of pig-iron 
output hitherto attained in any one year. 



NOVA SCOTIA MINING INTELLIGENCE. 

(From Our Own Correspondent.) 



During the month of January 385 gold mining areas were 
taken up under prospecting license in the different districts, 



MINING SHARE MARKET. 

The market for mining shares has been more active during 
the month than for a long time past. 

The consolidation of the Centre Star and other properties 
in British Columbia, has been favorably received, and all the 
floating stock of it and the St. Eugene has been quietly absorbed. 

The Canadian Gold Fields Syndicate is firm on the satis- 
factory reports presented at the annual meeting. There is a 
considerable demand for many of the low-priced Rossland 
properties, on the belief that the smelter charges in the future 
will be so reduced as to enable many of the properties that are 
now closed down, to produce ore at a profit. 

In the Industrials there has been a fair amount of business 
done and prices are buoyant on the increased earnings of the 
various companies, due to the improved business conditions. 

The following list shows the quotations for the week ending 



68 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Bid. 
.05 J 

.35 



February 8th, as supplied to the Review by Robert Meredith 
& Co., 57 St. Francois Xavier St., Montreal: — 
Par value 

of shares. Asked 

.10 Canadian Gold Fields Syndicate 06 

5.00 Cariboo Hydraulic 

1 . 00 Centre Star .40 

1 00 Deer Trail Consolidated .02 

1 . 00 Giant 02 J 

10.00 Granby Consolidated 10.25 

10 .00 Montreal and Boston ■ i 

1.00 North Star [[ 1 

1 . 00 Payne 02 

1 . 00 Rambler Cariboo 35 

1 . 00 Monte Christo '03i 

1.00 St. Eugene 68 

1.00 White Bear .'02^ 

100 . 00 Nova Scotia Steel (common) .73 

100.00 Nova Scotia Steel (preferred) 122.00 

100 .00 Dominion Coal (common) .81^ 

100.00 Dominion Coal (preferred) 122. OOJ 

100.00 Dominion Iron and Steel (common). . .32 
100.00 Dominion Iron and Steel (preferred) . .79^ 
— Dominion Iron and Steel (bonds) 85 



INDUSTRIAL NOTES. 

Bulletin No. 10 is a very handsome descriptive pamphlet, 
printed in two colors, and issued by the Jeffrey Mfg. Company, 
Columbus, Ohio. It contains upwards of 60 pages of illustra- 
ted matter dealing with the well known Jeffrey electric mine 
locomotives, and will well repay perusal. 

The David Maydole Hammer Company, Norwich, N.Y. 
sent us an illustrated catalogue describing hammers manufac- 
tured by them, which now comprise 343 styles, sizes and finishes. 

The Allis-Chalmers-Bullock, Ltd. are distributing among 
their clients and others, a very handsomely printed monthly 
calendar, in gold and colors! These cards are not only useful 
but ornamental, and make an acceptable gift. 

The Abner Doble Compaiiy, represented in Canada by the 
John McDougall Iron Works Company, Ltd., in Montreal, send 
us a copy of Bulletin No. 7, devoted to the Doble Tangential 
Water Wheel. In addition to the usual information, this cata- 
logue contains data sheet for estimates, which should greatly 
facilitate ordering. 

B. Greening Wire Company have just issued an interesting 
pamphlet on Wire Bonding for Concrete Construction. This 
is a subject in which many of our readers are interested, and 
they will therefoie be glad to have the pamphlet in question, 
which very fully covers the subject. 

Extensi^'e additions to the works of the Canadian Rand 
Drill Company at Sherbrooke Que., will shortly be undertaken. 
A new foundry, it is understood, is among the improvements to 
be carried through. 

The Sullivan Machinery Company are good enough to send 
us the following cutting from the Cripple Creek Times, which 
may be of interest to some of our readers: — 

An interesting feature of mining in the Cripple Creek dis- 
trict, and an item which is as closely watched by the operator 
as any other, is the cost of making air per drill shift, upon which 
largely depends the possibilities of economical operation. The 
wide range in this one respect is shown by the fact that in some 
instances the cost is as high as $3 per drill shift, while in others 
the same results are obtained at a cost of 53 cents. This great 
difference is due to the class of machinery used and the care and 
intelligence with which it is operated. Of the different records 
obtained from mine operators the following seems to show the 
greatest economy: 

Mr. John Sharp, the well known lessee who ■ op^-'ac'ng 
the Morning Glory of the Work and t'.ic Colorado B'< s o) the 
Cripple Creek Consolidated Company, furnished data o^^ering 
a period from September 20, 1904, to January' 17, 1905 luring 
which time 1,367 drill shifts were operated. " As shown l)y his 
books, during that time the coal bills amounted to .fl 183.17. 
The greatest number of shifts worked in one month was in October 
when 492 were employed. 

The rock hoisted amounted to 7,500 tons during the months 
of October, November and December, and the coal bills for 
hoisting amounted to .|450, leaving the total coal bill for running 
the air compressor .$733.17, or 53.7 cents per drill shift. 

It is doubted if this record can be duplicated in the district. 
In speaking of his accomplishnaent in economical operation 
Mr. Sliari) said: "I think that my record for making air per 
drill shift is about as low as it can be made. My cost was 53.7 
cents per drill shift- for coal. The machine used was a straight- 
line compressor with simple steam and compound air cylinders, 
and was built by the Sullivan Machinery Company of Chicago. 
It is supposed to operate only ten drills, but often exceeded the 



rated capacity. In my opinion it is as economical a compres.sor 
as can be constructed, and certainly the tests I gave the machine 
under all conditions, are sufficient to demonstrate this fact." 

The Sullivan Machinery Company of Chicago, reports the 
appointment of Mr. H. T. Walsh, as manager for the Pacific 
Coast, with headquarters with the well-known firm of Henshaw, 
Bulkley & Co., at San Francisco. Mr. Walsh has had an extended 
experience with mining equipment having represented the 
Sullivan Machinery Co. in the Rocky mountain region for a 
number of years. Henshaw, Bulkley & Co. who have been for 
a long time the agents of the Sullivan Machinery Co. will con 
tinue to carry a stock of Sullivan rock drills and compressors 

The Golden Key Mining Co., Hillside, Ariz., is in.stalling 
a power plant to operate its machinery. Contract has been 
closed for two of the well-known " Hornsby-Akroyd " oil engines 
16 horse power each, built by the De La Vergne Machine Com- 
pany of New York. 

The American Steel Dredge Works, Logansport, Indiana 
which was organized by Messrs. James P. Karr and John D. 
Ranch; now have their complete plant in operation. 

An important order recently .secured by the Canadian 
Westinghouse Company was obtained from the Vancouver 
Power Company, of Vancouver, B.C. This order included a 
1500 H.P., 2200 volt revolving field engine type generator, 
which will be direct connected to a Pelton water wheel. This 
is a duplicate of the generators now in operation in the power 
plant of this company and will operate in multiple therewith. 
The order includes switch boards, air blast transformers of 550 
K.W. capacity. There is also included in the order a 1000 K.W. 
60 cycle rotary converter to operate .550 volts. This converter 
will furnish power for railway work and will be controlled direct 
from the switchboard. 

A conspicious departure in the lighting of canals is that of 
the Welland canal near St. Catharine, Ontario. Over 600 A.C. 
series arc lamps have been provided by the Canadian Westing- 
house Company and these have been "in operation for the past 
few months and have given splendid service. This installation 
as a whole redounds great credit to the Ontario government, 
as well as the consulting engineer, Mr. R. J. Paflcer, under 
whose direction the complete plant was installed. 

There is ever}' indication of the reawakening of the mining 
industry in the northwestern part of Ontario. The Northern 
Development Co. for example, which has being doing hand 
work for several years in the Rainy River district is now pre- 
paring to operate on an extensive scale, and recently purchased 
from Allis-Chalmers-Bullock, Limited, Montreal a complete 
mining plant including boilers, air compressors, rock drills, 
hoisting engine, pump and a large quantity of miscellaneous 
mining equipment. 



MINING AND METALLURGICAL PATENTS. 

(Specially reported for the Canadian Mining Review) . 

806,173 — Electric Furnace. Romaine M. Meyers, Fruitvale, 
Cal. 

An electric furnace having a plurality of pyro-electro- 
lytic bars within a heat resisting shell, means of protect- 
ing the substance to be heated and the said bars during 
the insertion and withdrawal of said substance, con- 
sisting of the heat-resisting rods arranged in parallel 
with said bars, between said bars and the space occupied 
by said substance. 

805,414 — Metal Separator for Ore-Concentrating Plants. Henry 
C. Krause, Point Mills, Michigan. 
The combination of a hopper having a funnel-shaped 
partition which terminates at the bottom in a contract- 
ed discharge-opening between the top and bottom of 
' e hopper and forms with the lower part of the hopper 
a receptacle for metal and heavy concentrates passing 
through said discharge-opening when the opening at 
the lower end of the hopper is closed, and a trap con- 
nected with the lower part of said hopper and provided 
at its upper and lower ends with valves and a water- 
supply connection leading into said hopper between 
said partition and the upper valves. 

806,621 — -Copper Refining Furnace. Ralph Baggaley, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

The combination of thick metal walls built up of com- 
paratively narrow segments, a relatively thin refractory 
lining, a solid removable metal t ip, of sufficient thick- 
ness to withstand and to consei ve the internal heat, 
means for supplying auxiliary heat above the level 
of the bath, means for introducing precreated hydro- 
carbon gas below the level of the bath, means for regu- 
lating the escape of hot gases, and means for tipping 
the vessel either to receive or to pour the charge. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



69 



807,973 — Process of Obtaining Marketable Electrolytic Deposits. 

Pierre Steenlet, Brussels, Belgium, assignor to Marcel 
Perrew Lloyd, Brussels, Belgium, 
A process which consists in charging the diaphragm 
with an organic substance, treating said organic sub- 
stance to render it insoluble interposing the thus- 
charged diaphragm between a metallic-anode and the 
cathode and the corresponding portions of an electro- 
lyte containing a metal, and causing an electric current 
to flow from the anode to the cathode through the thus- 
charged diaphragm and form a metallic deposit on the 
cathode. 

806,121 — Zinc Furnace. Emile Dor-Dellatre, Budel, Nether- 
lands. 

In a gas-heated zinc furnace, the combination with 
a furnace-chamber, of air and gas channels adapted to 
communicate with the chamber through a common 
passage, adjustable means for regulating the admission 
of air and gas to said common passage, and means 
within the chamber in alinement with said passage to 
deflect laterally the currents entering the chamber 
through said passage. 

807,271 — Process of Extracting Metals from their Sulfids. 
Antonine H. Imbert, Grand-Montrouge, France. 
The process for extracting from its sulfid, a metal having 
less affinity for sulfur than is posse.ssed by copper, con- 
sisting in mixing the sulfid of such metal with the 
amount of copper only sufficient to combine with the 
whole of the sulfur, in heating this mixture to a tem- 
perature suitable for the reaction for forming copper 
sulfid and liberating the other metal, and collecting 
this liberated metal and the copper sulfid separately. 

807,016 — Conveyor. Joseph H. Burns, Cleveland, Ohio. 

A conveyor comprising two parallel chains arranged 
side by side and a suitable distance apart laterally 
and aprons spaced longitudinally of the chains and 
attached at tlieir forward ends only and removably 
to the chains, which aprons are detached by pressing 
the chains toward each other at the forward ends 
of the aprons. 

806,774 — Process of Treating Ores. Horace F. Brown, Oakland, 
Cal. 

A process which consists in reducing the same whOe 
in atmospheric suspension and during such suspension 
causing the reduced particles to agglomerate into 
clinker, the bodning of the ore being caused by the 
resultant spongy condition thereof. 

807,071 — Gas Producer. Bruno Graupe, Colgnoe, Deutz, Ger- 
many. 

In a gas producer with top and bottom combustion 
zones and intermediate means for the withdrawal of 
the gas, a substantially vertical grating composed of 
vertically-extending grate-bars forming part of the 
producer-walls through which the gases are led off. 

806,894 — Calcining Furnace — George N. Jepson,- Worcester, 
Mass. 

A down-draft calcining-furnace comprising a heating- 
chamber, a fire-box, flues connecting the fire-box with 
the upper portion of said chamber and flues at the 
lower portion of said chamber for carrying away the 
products of combustion, a series of tubes within said 
chamber and extending through the walls thereof, 
and collars fitted within the walls of said chamber and 
loosely surrounding said tubes whereby the tubes are 
permitted to expand longitudinally. 

807,594 — Gas Producer. William H. Bradley, Bellevue, Pa., 
assignor of one-fourth to Alexander Gilliland and one- 
fourth to William C. Bradley, Bellevue, Pa. and one- 
eighth to Sara L. Bradley and one-eighth to Mrs. M. 
E. Webster, St. Louis, Mo. 

A gas-producer having a water-trough, a cross-inclined 
wall and a wind-pipe above said wall and transverse 
thereto, said wind-pipe having clearance-spaces on 
both sides thereof for the removal of ashes. 

807,661 — Ore Concentrator. Walter S. Craven and George W. 
Craven, Butte, Mont. 

An ore concentrator having an inclined feed-table, 
means whereby water is supplied thereto in only suffi- 
cient quantity to insure the flow of ore and to flow 
with the latter, a trough at and extending beyond the 
lower end of the table, the edge of the trough farthest 
from the table on the same plane as the table, and the 
edge of the other side under and separate from the 
lower edge of the table, a partition extending from the 
table to near the bottom of the trough, and means for 
agitating the material in the trough. 



8o6,l03 — Conveyor. Paul Burchardt, Kramfors, Sweden. 

The combination with a chute, having a bottom and 
longitudinal ribs located within said chute and near 
the bottom thereof, of a belt consisting of a plurality 
of flat sheet-metal plates hinged together, said belt 
being movable longitudinally within said chute and 
bearing on said longitudinal ribs. 

807,118 — Apparatus for Drawing Coke-ovens. Isaac C. Kelly, 
Scottdale, Pa. 

The combination of tongs constructed to grasp the 
cokQ and hold the same, a carrier for said tongs arran- 
ged to alternately project the same into and draw the 
same out of the oven, and automatically operating 
mechanism for opening and closing said tongs. 

807,501 — Process of Concentrating Ores. Alfred Schwarz, New 
York, N.Y., assignor to Schwarz Ore Treating Company, 
Phoenix, Ariz., a corporation of Arizona. 
A method which consists in subjecting a non-sulfid 
ore to the action of a soluble sulfid to convert the miner- 
al into a sulfid, then treating the mass with a hydro- 
carbon and finally separating the hydrocarbon with 
the entrapped metallic constituents of the ore from 
the tailings. 

808,293 — Roasting Furnace. Frank E. Marcy, Chicago, 111. 

In a furnace, a hollow rabble-shaft, a pipe having an 
inlet branch confined within the shaft for conveying 
a cooling medium through the shaft in one direction, 
and a return branch within the shaft coupled to, or 
forming a continuation of said inlet branch, for con- 
veying the cooling medium in the opposite direction. 

808,488 — Combined Apparatus for Grinding or Crushing, Wash- 
ing and Separating Ores. Reginald Stanley, Nuneaton, 
England. 

An apparatus for treatment of ores, comprising rolls 
between which the material is reduced to a coarsely- 
ground condition, finishing-rolls adapted to allow only 
a thin layer of material to pass between them, a travel- 
ing belt of gauze underneath the finishing-roll to catch 
the material falling therefrom, means of any kind for 
forcing the crushed material through the gauze into 
a trough below the same, means for redistributing the 
material that cannot pass through the gauze to the 
finishing-rolls for regrinding. 

808,141 — Method of Making Lead Hydrate. George D. Coleman, 
Boston, Mass. 

A method of continuously making lead hydrate which 
consists in introducing comminuted metallic lead, 
water and a limited quantity of an oxidizing reagent 
into a closed vessel, subjecting the contents to attrition 
and mixing and continuously drawing off the product 
with some of the water. 

808,361 — Process of Roasting Ores. Herbert Haas, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

A process which consists of bringing them to a point 
of ignition, and supplying a light blast of air evenly 
distributed throughout the whole mass for the purpose 
of maintaining combustion thereof, and creating a 
sintered agglomeration, said blast being .sufficiently 
light, and being continued for a sufficient time, to 
drive off and oxidize only the more easily-separable 
molecules of sulfur, or other metalloids, maintaining 
the heat below the smelting-point, and then increasing 
the blast to separate from the residue the less easily 
separable molecules of sulfur, continuing to increase 
the blast as required for the complete separation of 
the sulfur and then decreasing the blast in proportion 
to the amount of air decreasingly required to combine 
with the residual sulfur or other metalloids. 

808,741 — Coke Handling Apparatus. George G. Fryer, Syra- 
cuse, N.Y. 

The combination in a coke-handling apparatus with 
a coke-oven; of a device for discharging the body of 
coke from the oven, and a platform for receiving the 
body of coke, said platform being movable on an axis 
arranged in a plane at an angle to the path of the body 
of coke during the passage of said coke through the 
ovens. 

808,754 — Method of Applying Heat for the Treatment of Ores 
and Metalliferous Sands. William J. Jackson, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

A method Avhich consists in adding to said ores or 
metalliferous sands a suitable exothermic material 
capable of developing heat when the aqueous solution 
of the extracting reagent is applied thereto. 



70 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



809,085— Electrolytic Apparatus. Henry S. Blackmore, Mount 
Vernon, N.Y. 

An apparatus comprising an electrolytic vessel having 
a means for producing a heavy and light metal alloy 
by the electrolysis of the light-metal compounds, in 
combination with means for displacing the heavy and 
light metal alloy by gravity, means for associating the 
heavy and light metal alloy with a metal hydroxid, 
means for removing the light-metal oxid thus produced, 
means for converting the light-metal oxid into light- 
metal hydroxid, and means for returning a portion of 
the light-metal hydroxid to the chamber containing 
the heavy and light metal alloy. 

808,798 — Apparatus for the Agitation of Solutions used in Elec- 
trodeposition of Metals. William C. "Wood and Bertie 
Oaksford, London, England, assignor to W. Canning & 
Co., Birmingham, England. 

In an apparatus for the electrodeposition of metals, 
the combination with the tank for containing the elec- 
trolyte of a trough arranged within the same, the said 
trough having within it a plunger designed for drawing 
the electrolyte into the trough and ejecting it there- 
from. 

808,618— Method of Converting Matte. Charles M. Allen, Lolo 
Mont., assignor to Ralph Baggaley, Pittsburg, Pa. 
A niethod which consists in bessemerizing it is a vessel 
having a non-silicious interior, and thereafter trans- 
ferring it into an acid-lined vessel and bessemerizing it. 



'a grand journal.' 

'An interesting fact in connection with The Mining Journal is that 
with the year 1905 it enters upon the third score and ten years of its exist- 
ence, having been established in the year 1835. While three score years 
and ten may be the span of life allotted to man — his period of usefulness 
drawing at that age to a close — it is not so with The Mining Journal. Time 
has written no wrinkle upon its brow; stronger, brighter, better than 
ever, and of great good to mining men all over the world.' — Los Angeles 
Mining Review. 

TLhc ill^ining Journal. 

RAILWAY AND COMMERCIAL GAZETTE. 

The Oldest Mining Paper and the Pioneer of the Tech- 
nical and Trade Press of the World. 

Circulates all over the World amongst Miners, Metallurgists, 
Engineers, Manufacturers, Capitalists, and Investors. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY, PRICE 6d. 

Subscriptions— Inland, £1. 4s. per annum. Abroad, £1. 8s. 
per annum, payable in advance. 

THE MINING JOURNAL advocates the interests of the Min- 
ing and Metallurgical Industries at home and abroad, and has a 
unique reputation for its Special Correspondence from all the 
Mining Districts of the World, and also for its Prices Current of 
Metals, which are bought and sold in all parts of the Globe upon 
the basis of the 'next published Mining Journal prices.' 

THE MINING JOURNAL was established more than seventy 
years ago, and still maintains its position as the leading organ 
of the World's Press devoted to Mining and its allied interests. 

THE MINING JOURNAL'S advertising pages form a com- 
plete Buyer's Directory. 

THE MINING JOURNAL is neither controlled, nor is any 
interest in it held or exercised by any Mine-owner, Speculator, 
or Syndicate, nor is it in any way whatever connected with any 
Stock or Share Dealing Agency. 

THE MINING JOURNAL 

46 Queen Victoria Street, E.G., — LONDON, England. 



The Canadian Bank 
of Commerce 

PAID UP CAPITAL $10,000,000 REST $4,500,000 

Head Office: TORONTO 

B. E. WALKER, General Manager. 

ALEX. LAIRD, Ass't Gen'l Manager. 

Branches throughout Canada and in the United States and 
England, including the following: 



Atlin 


Nelson 


Seattle 


Cobalt 


New Glasgow 


Skagway 


Cranbrook 


Ottawa 


Springhill 


Dawson 


Parry Sound 


Sydney 


Fernie 


Penticton 


Toronto 


Greenwood 


Port Arthur 


Vancouver 


Halifax 


Portland, Ore. 


Victoria 


Ladysmith 


Princeton 


White Horse 


Montreal 


San Francisco 


Winnipeg 


Nanaimo 


Sault Ste. Marie 





NEW YORK: 16 Exchange Place 
LONDON, England: 60 Lombapd St., E.G. 



A branch has recently been opened at COBALT, in the 
newly-discovered silver mining camp in New Ontario. 




FORTY-SIXTH YEAR. 



C6 PAGES : WEEKLY : ILLUSTRATED. 

INDISPENSABLE TO MINING MEN 



$3 PER YEAR POSTPAID. 

SEND FOB SAMPLE COPT. 

Mining and Scientific Press 

330 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



MAJOR DAVID BEAMES, 

Late I.S.C., and of Berl^^ampstead, Fngland. 

If the above will communicate with C. J. Walker's 
Advertising Agency, 24 Coleman Street, London, 
England, he may hear of something to his advantage. 



Blaisdell Cyanide Vat Excavating and Distributing Macliinery 

Blaisdcll Machinery solves the problem of abolishing unskilled labour from Cyanide Plants, and provides the final 
link for a complete mechanical method of handling ore between the mine and the dump, and effects a saving of from 50 
per cent, to 90 [xt coui. in operative expoiisos. 

THE JOHN McDOUGALL CALEDONIAN IRON WORKS CO. Ltd., Montreal 

Sole Manufacturers in Canada of this machinery under Canadian Patents No. 81,954 and No. 86,862. Send for Catalogue. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xxiii 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC 

The Attention of Miners and Capitalists in the United States 
and in Europe is invited to the 

Great Mineral Territory 

Open for Investment in the Province of Quebec. 



Gold, Silver, Coppep, Ipon, Asbestos, Mica, Plumbago, Phosphate, 

Chpomie Ipon, Galena, Etc. 

Ornamental and Structural Materials in Abundant Variety. 

The Mining Law gives absolute security to Title, and has been 
specially framed for the encouragement of Mining. 



Mining concessions are divided into three classes: — 

1. In unsurveyed territory (a) the first class contains 400 
acres, (b) the second, 200 acres, and (c) the third, 100 acres. 

2. In surveyed townships the three classes respectively 
comprise one, two and four lots. 

All lands supposed to contain mines or ores belonging to 
the Crown may be acquired from the Commissioner of Coloniza- 
tion and Mines (a) as a mining concession by purchase, or (b) 
be occupied and worked under a mining license. 

No sale of mining concessions containing more than 400 
acres in superficies can be made by the Commissioner to the 
same person. The Govenor-in-Council may, however, grant 
a larger extent of territory up to 1,000 acres under special 
circumstances. 

The rates charged and to be paid in full at the time of the 
purchase are $5 and $10 per acre for mining lands containing 
the superior metals*; the first named price being for lands 
situated more than 12 miles and the last named for lands situated 
less than 12 miles from the railway. 

If containing the inferior metal, $2 and $4 according to 
distance from railway. 

Unless stipulated to the contrary in the letters patent in 
concessions • for the mining of superior metals, the purchaser 
has the right to mine for all metals found thereon ; in concessions 
for the mining of the inferior metals, those only may be mined 
for. 

*The superior metals include the ores of gold, silver, lead, copper, 
nickel, graphite, asbestos, mica, and phosphate of lime. The words inferior 
metals include all other minerals and ores. 



Mining lands are sold on the express condition that the 
purchaser shall commence bona fide to mine within two years 
from the date of purchase, and shall not spend less than $500 
if mining for the superior metals; and not less than $200 if for 
inferior metals. In default, cancellation of sale of mining lands. 

(b) Licenses may be obtained from the Commissioner on 
the following terms: — Application for an exploration and pros- 
pecting license, if the mine is on private land, $2 for every 100 
acres or fraction of 100; if the mine is on Crown lands (1) in 
surveyed territory, $5 for every 100 acres, and (2) in unsurveyed 
territory, $5 for each square mile, the license to be valid for three 
months and renewable. The holder of such license may after- 
wards purchase the mine paying the prices mentioned. 

Licenses for mining are of two kinds: Private lands licenses 
where the mining rights belong to the Crown, and public lands 
licenses. These licenses are granted on payment of a fee of $5 
and an annual rental of $1 per acre. Each license is granted for 
200 acres or less, but not for more; is valid for one year, and is 
renewable on the same terms as those on which it was originally 
granted. The Governor-in-Council may at any time require 
the payment of the royalty in lieu of fees for a mining license 
and the annual rental — such royalties, unless otherwise deter- 
mined by letters patent or other title from the Crown, being 
fixed at a rate not to exceed three per cent, of the value at the 
mine of the mineral extracted after deducting the cost of mining 
it. 



The fullest information will be cheerfully given on appUcation to 

THE MINISTER OF LANDS, MINES AND FISHERIES, 

PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, QUEBEC. 



xxiv 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Ontario's 

MINING 

LANDS 



THE Crown domain of the Province of Ontario contains an area 
of over 100,000,000 acres, a large part of which is comprised 
in geological formations known to carry valuable minerals 
and extending northward from the great lakes and westward from 
the Ottawa river to the Manitoba boundary. 

Iron in large bodies oi magnetite and hematite; copper in sulphide 
and native form; gold, mostly in free milling quartz; silver, native 
and sulphides; zincblendes, galena, pyrites, mica, graphite, talc, marl, 
brick clay, building stones of all kinds and other useful minerals have 
been found in many places and are being worked at the present time. 

In the famous Sudbury region Ontario possesses one of the two 
sources of the world's supply of nickel, and the known deposits of this 
metal are very large. Recent discoveries of corundum in Eastern - 
Ontario are believed to be the most extensive in existence. 

The output of iron, copper and nickel in 1903 was much beyond 
that of any previous year, and large developments in there industries 
are now going on. 

In the older parts of the Province salt, petroleum and natural 
gas are important products. 

The mining laws of Ontario are liberal, and the prices of mineral 
lands low. Title by freehold or lease, on working conditions for seven 
years. There are no royalties. 

The climate is unsurpassed, wood and water are plentiful, and in 
the summer season the prospector can go almost anywhere in a 
canoe. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway runs through the entire mineral 

belt. 

For reports of the Bureau of Mines, maps, mining laws, etc., apply 

to 

HON. FRANK COCHRANE, 

Commissioner of Lands and Mines. 

or 

THOS. W. GIBSON, 

Director Bureau of Mines, 

Toronto, Ontario. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XXV 




PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 

Leases for Mioes of Gold, Silver, Coal, I[od, Copper, Lead, Tio 



PRECIOUS STONES. 



TITLES GIVEN DIRECT FROM THE CROWN, ROYALTIES AND RENTALS MODERATE. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 



Under the provisions of Chap. 1, Acts of 1892, of Mines and Minerals, 
Licenses are issued for prospecting Gold and Silver for a term of twelve 
months. Mines of Gold and Silver are laid off in areas of 150 by 250 feet, 
any number of which up to one hundred can be included in one License, 
provided that the length of the block does not exceed twice its width. The 
cost is 50 cents per area. Leases of any number of areas are granted for a 
term of 40 years at S2.00 per area. These leases are forfeitable if not worked, 
but advantage can be taken of a recent Act by which on payment of 50 cents 
annually for each area contained in the lease it becomes non-forfeitable if 
the labor be not performed. 



Licenses are issued to owners of quartz crushing mills, who are required 
to pay Royalty on all the Gold they extract at the rate of two per cent, on 
smelted Gold valued at S19 an ounce, and on smelted Gold valued at $18 
an ounce. 

Applications for Licenses or Leases are receivable at the office of the 
Commissioner of Public Works and Mines each week day from 10 a.m. to 
4 p.m., except Saturday, when the hours are from 10 to 1. Licenses are 
issued in the order of application according to priority. If a person dis- 
covers Gold in any part of the Province, he may stake out the boundaries 
of the areas he desires to obtain, and this gives him one week and twenty- 
four hours for every 15 miles from Halifax in which to make application at 
the Department for his ground 



MINES OTHER THAN GOLD AND SILVER. 



Licenses to search for eighteen months are issued, at a cost of thirty 
dollars, for minerals other than Gold and Silver, out of which areas can be 
selected for min ing under lease. These leases are for four renewable terms 
of twenty years each. The cost for the first year is fifty doOars, and an 
annual rental of thirty dollars secures each lease from liability to forfeiture 
for non-working. 

All rentals are refunded if afterwards the areas are worked and pay 
royalties All titles transfer , etc , of minerals are registered by the Mines 
Department for a nominal fee and provision is made for lessees and licensees 
whereby they can acquire promptly, either by arrangement with the owner 
or by arbitration all lands required for thier mining works. 

The Government as a security for the payment of royalties, makes tht 
royalties firjt lieu on the plant and fixtures of the mine. 



The unusually generous condition under which the Government of 
Nova Scotia grants its minerals have introduced many outside capitalists, 
who have always stated that the Mining laws of the Province were the best 
they had had experience of. 

The royalties on the remaining minerals are: Copper, four cents on 
every unit; Lead, two cents upon every unit; Iron, five cents on every ton; 
Tin and Precious Stones, five per cent.; Coal, 10 cents on every ton sold. 

The Gold district of the Province extends along its entire Atlantic 
coast, and varies in width from 10 to 40 miles, and embraces an area of over 
three thousand nules, and is traversed by good roads and accessible at all 
points by water. Coal is known in the Counties of Cumberland, Colchester 
Pictou, and Antigonish, and at numerous points in the Island of Cape Breton 
The ores of Iron, Copper, etc., are met at nulherous points, and are being 
rapidly secured by miners and investors. 



Copies of the Mining Law and any information can be^had on application to 

The Hon.W. T. PIPES, 

Comrpissioner Public Works and Mines, 

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA. 



XX vi 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




DOMINION OF CANADA 



SYNOPSIS OF CANADIAN NORTH-WEST 
MINING REGULATIONS. 



COAL— Coal lands may be purchased at $10 per acre for soft coal and $20 for 
anthracite. Not more than 320 acres can be acquired by one individual or company. 
Royalty at the rate of 10 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds shall be collected on the gross 
output. 

QUARTZ— A tree miner's certificate is granted upon payment in advance of $7.50 
per annum for an individual, and from $50 to $100 per annum for a company, 
according to capital. 

A free miner having discovered mineral in place, may locate a claim 1 ,500 feet x 
1,500 feet. 

The fee for recording a claim is $5. 

At least $100 must be expended on the claim each year, or paid to the mining 
recorder in lieu thereof. When $500 has been expended or paid, the locator may, 
upon having a survey, made, and upon complying with other requirements, purchase 
the land at $1 an acre. 

The patent provides for the payment of a royalty of 2^ per cent, on the sales. 

Placer mining claims generally are 100 feet square ; entry fee $5, renewable 
yearly. 

A free miner may obtain two leases to dredge for gold of five miles each for a 
term of twenty years, renewable at the discretion of the Minister of the Interior. 

The lessee shall have a dredge in operation within one season from the date of 
the lease for each five miles. Rental $10 per annum for each mile of river 
leased. Royalty at the rate of 2^ per cent, collected on the output after it exceeds 
$10,00C 



W. W. CORY, 

Deputy of the Minister of the Interior. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xxvii 



DEEP DRILLING 

makes economical mining and the deepest hole 
can be drilled at the smallest cost by a 

DIAMOND 
ROCK DRILL 



You will find lots of 
information in our 
new catalogue — may 
we send it? 




it can cut through 2,500 feet of solid rock in a 
vertical line. It brings up solid cylinders of rock, 
showing formation and character. 

Made in all capacities, for 
Hand or Horsepower, Steam 
or Compressed Air — mounted 
or unmounted. 



American Diamond RogI( Driil . Company 

95 Liberty Street, NEW YORK CITY, U.S.A. 

Cable Address, "Deciduous," New York. 



xxviii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



HADFIELD'S4r?SHEFFIELD 



Heclon Rock and Ore Breaker 

HADFIELD AND JACK'S PATENT 

The only Perfect Gyratory Stone-Cruhher 

THE PARTS THAT ARE SUBJECT TO EXCESSIVE WEAR ARE MADE OF 

Hadfield's Patent "Era" Maganese Steel 



WE MANUFACTURE JAW BREAKERS, CRUSHING ROLLS, 
ELEVATORS, BIN GATES, AND GOLD MINING REQUISITES. 




Sole Representatives of the Hadfleld Steel Fouadry Company, Ltd., Sheffield, for Canada. 
PEACOCK BROTHERS, Canada Life Building, [Montreal. 



M. BEATTY & SONS, Limited 

WEILLAND, ONTARIO 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




DREDGES 
DERRICKS 
MINE HOISTS 
CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS 
for SAND and WATER 

STONE DERRICKS 
STEEL SKIPS 



DITCHERS 
STEAM SHOVELS 
HOISTING ENGINES 
SUBMARINE ROCK 

DRILLING MACHINERY 

CLAM-SHELL BUCKETS 
COAL AND CONCRETE TUBS 



AND OTHER CONTRACTORS' MACHINERY 
AGENTS: 

E. Leonard & Sons, Montreal, Que., and St. John, N.B. The Stuart Machinery Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

The Wm. Hamilton Mfg. Co., Vancouver, B.C. 



HEINE SAFETY BOILER 




MANUFACTURED BY 



The Canadian Heine Safety Boiler Co. 



TORONTO, ONT. 



THE HEINE SAFETY BOILER-Made in un- 
its of 100 to 500 h.p., and can be set in batteries of any 
number. Suitable for Mines, Pulp Mills, Water and Elec- 
tric Installations, and large plants generally. The best 
and most economical boiler made. 



the: 



anacJian^Tlming Review 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



INDEX 



1905 

JULY-DECEMBER 



INDEX TO VOL. XXY. 



Adams, Dr. F. D., and the Directorship of the Geological 

Survey 108 

All^erta, Coal in 3 

Alheita Coal Mining Notes 64,102 

Alberta, (.)il in 30 

American Zinc Duties 53 

Americans in Temiskaming 37 

Anglo Canadian Graphite Syndicate 21 

Anthracite Mining Costs 34 

Argall, Philip 53 

Asbestos Mining in Canada 151 

^sbestos Mining in Quebec 116 

Asbestos and Mica, Monographs on 144 

Atlin District, Steam Shovels in 54 

Atlin District. Season of 1905 in 108 

Beaver Valley Oil Company I39 

Big Bend Di.strict, B.C I73 

Big Four Company's Misrepresentations . 70 

Big Dipper Mining Company, Meeting of 182 

Bloom, A Song of Cobalt. . \ 110 

Bounties on Coal Oil 34 

Bounties on Oil 106 

Bounties paid by Dominion Government 133 

Britannia Copper Syndicate, Meeting of 64 

Britannia Copper Mines 61 

British Columbia (special correspondence) . . .96,129 

British Columbia Coal Notes 32 

British Columbia Coal Mining Notes 63,102,138 

British Columbia Mining Notes 30, 61, 103, 139,' 180 

British Columbia Mining Notes (special correspondence) . . 174 

British Columbia Zinc Ores 1 

British Columbia Zinc Resources 25 

Canada Corundum Company's Mill, Recent Developments at, 77 

Canada Pig Iron Production in 57 

Canadian Copper, Smelter of 36 

Canadian Gold Fields Syndicate, Dividend 30 

Canadian Graphite Developments 123 

Canadian Metals Company 61 

Canadian-Mexican, Trade Developments of 184 

Canadian Minerals at Liege 53 

Canadian Mining, Revival in m 

Canadian Mining Institute, Officers and Council of 158 

Cariboo Consolidated 182 

Cariboo Consolidated, Ltd., Meeting of 164 

Cariboo Consolidated, Ltd., Extraordinary Meeting of 184 

Chibogamoo Mining Company 9 I8O 

Classes for Miners 38 

Coal Imports to San Francisco 58 

Coal in Newfoundland .• 58 

Coal Oil Bounties 34 

Coal Supplies, Digest of Evidence for Royal Commission 57 

Coal Tests 25 

Cobalt 17(3 

Cobalt District, Invalidation of claims in 98 

Cobalt District, Market for Ores 143 

Coleman Township, Ont., Cobalt Silver in 70 

Company Notes 33, 66, 101, 141, 184 

Copper Iland-Book, The ' 57 

CopjK'r Industry in Canada 71 

Copper Mines of Lake Superior 57 

Copper ruining & Smelting Co. of Ontario 61 

Copper Prices 54 

Co])per, The World's Output of 34 

Copper Market Il(!port 106 

Coste, E., On yjroposed Revision of Ontario Mining Law 94 

CroA\ 's Nest Pass Coal Company, Production of (half-year). . . 32 



Dalhousie University 33 

Department of Mines, A National 5 

Dillon-Mills, S., On occurrences of hematite North of Georgian 

Bay 

Dismissal of Le Roi Director 95 

Dominion Iron & Steel Company, Annual Report of 134 

Dominion fJovernment Bounties 133 

Dominion Steel Company, Financial Position of 102 

Dredging in the Yukon 140 

Drummond, Dr. W. H no 

Eastern Coal Company, Maccan, N.S 182 

Eastern ( )ntario. Iron Pyrites in 14 

Electric Smelting of Iron 72 

Electric Smelting of Zinc Ores 83 

Elect ric Smelting and Newspaper Optimism (special corres- 
pondence) 93 

Electro Metallurgy of Iron, The 109 

Electrolytic Methods for producing bycalcic Phosphate 15 

Elk River Coal & Oil Company , 65 

Eva Mining Company, B.C., Annual Meeting of 99 

Examination and Valuation of Mines, by J. E. Hard- 
man 17, 90, 124 

Fergie, Chas., Address to 76 

Fort Francis, Ont., Iron Ranges North of 35 

Forest Rose Mining Company 61 

Fraser, Graham, Retirement of 126 

Garde, A.C 53 

Geology of Western Ore Deposits 13] 

Geological Survey of Canada, Economical Work in (1904). ... 79 

Government by Order-in-Council in Ontario 38 

Government by Order-in-Council in Ontario (correspon- 
dence) 92 

Great Northern Mines, Ltd., Annual Meeting of 62 

Graphite Mining and Canadian Possibilities 146 

Granby Con. M. S. & P. Co., Report of no 

Granby Con. M. S. & P. Co., Directors' Report of 137 

Granby Con. M. S. & P. Co., Extraordinary Meeting of 182 

Granby Company's Holdings at Phoenix 62 

Hall Mining & Smelting Company, Annual Report of 148, 177 

Hardman, J. E., on Examination and Valuation of Mines. 

17, 90, 124 

Hardman, J. E., on Quebec's New Mineral Region 9 

Hastings Exploration Syndicates' dividend. . .• 62 

Hastings Exploration Syndicate, 7tti. Annual Meeting of . . . . 65 

Hematite Deposits at Bell Island 109 

Hematite Occurrences North of Georgian Bay 119 

Hendryx Process at Nelson ' 54 

Hill Crest Coal & Coke Company, Prospectus of 3 

Hobart, F., on Mining Statistics 12 

Huntingdon-Heberlein Process 75 

Industrial Notes. . 33, 66, 106, 142, 183 

Ingalls, W. R. 53 

Initial, Title to Mineral Lands, Principles governing 144 

Inspection of Claims of Cobalt 69 

Invalidation of claims in Cobalt District 98 

lowa-Lillooet Gold Mining Company 63 

Iron, Electric Smelting of 72 

Iron Ore Resources of Nova Scotia 22 

Iron Interests of Nova Scotia 107 

Iron and Steel Trade in the United States 34 

Iron Ores of Nictaux and Torbrook, Analysis of 50 



Iron Ores of Nova, Scotia, Torbrook and Nictaux 47 

Iron Pyrites in Eastern Ontario 14 

Joint Stock Mining Companies, Law of 7 

Jones, Mr. F. P.. New General Manager of the Dominion Iron 

& Steel Company 145 

King Edward Mines, 2 

Kootenays, The, Mining in (special correspondence) 28 

Lake Superior, Copper Mines of 57 

Lake Superior, Corporation 109 

Lake Superior, Corporation, Annual Report of 99, 135 

Law, Joint Stock Mining Company's 7 

Lawrence, Dr 35 

Lead Poisoning, Prevention of 36 

Le Roi (special correspondence) 95 

Le Rpi and Mr. McMillan 2 

Le Roi Circulars 112 

Le Roi Amalgamation 170 

Le Roi Squabble, The 71 

Liege, Canadian Exhibition at, translated from the German 

by F. Cirkel 39 

Liege, Canadian Minerals at 53 

Lightning Creek Gold Gravel & Dredging Co 139 

Londonderrj' Iron Ore Deposits' 23 

Manitouian Island, Occurrences of Oil on 108 

Maritime Coal & Railway Company, Ltd 87 

Market for Ores from Cobalt District 143 

McKay, J., on Ontario Mining Law 51 

McKinley Mines, Ltd., Annual Meeting of 182 

McMillan, A. J., and Le Roi Mine 2 

Metal Market Conditions 37 

^lica in Canada, Production of 149 

Mines Branch Department of the Interior 144 

Alining Exhibit at Halifax 99 

Mining Interest in Canada, Rehabilitation of 108 

Mining Law Revision in Yukon 69 

Mining Men and Affairs 25, 55, 99, 132, 179 

Mining and Metallurgical Patents 171, 67 

Mining Statistics 101, 133, 180 

Mining Statistics, by Hobart 12 

Mining Incorporations, Ontario 141, 182 

Mining Incorporations, British Columbia 142, 183 

Montreal & Boston 33 

New Fairview Corporation 141 

Newfoundland Coal '. 58 

Newfoundland Gold Mining in 98 

Nictaux and Torbrook, Iron Ores of 50 

North Bay, Government Smelter at 35 

Nova Scotia Coal Notes 31, 182 

Nova Scotia Iron Ores of Torbrook and Nictaux ... 47 

Nova Scotia Coal Mining Notes 137, 63 

Nova Scotia Coal Mining Notes (special correspondence). 101, 131 

Nova Scotia Coal and the Ontario Market 141 

Nova Scotia Iron Ores 5 

Nova Scotia Iron Ores, Resources of - 22 

Nova Scotia Gold Mines — 29 

Nova Scotia Mining Notes 29, 60 102, 138, 182 

Nova Scotia Mining Notes (special correspondence 59 

Nova Scotia Mineral and Coal Production, Jan'y. to June ... 99 

Nova Scotia Mining Areas Applied for in November 179 

Nova Scotia Mining Society's Semi-annual Meeting 173 

Occurrences of hematite North of Little Current, Georgian 

Bay 119 

Officers and Council of Canadian Institute, 1905-6, 158 

Ogilvie Gold Dredging Co., Ltd 3 

Ogilvie, William 3 

Oil in the West 113 

Ontario, Bureau of Mines, Report of .' 173 

Ontario Concerning Mining Titles in 167 

Ontario, Mines Act Amendment of 168 

Ontario Mining Intelligence (special correspondence) 27 

Ontario Mining Law, Proposed Amendments to 51, 52 

Ontario Mining Laws, Proposed Revision of 70, 114, 127 

Ontario Mining Notes 29, 60, 103, 138, 181 

Ontario Mining Notes (special correspondence) 178 

Ontario Mining News (special correspondence) 59, 97, 130 

Ontario Miners' Meeting 175, 128, 144 



Ontario Proposed Mining Royalties 36 

Ontario Royalties on Minerals 2 

Pig Iron Production in Canada 57 

Pilot Bay Smelter, Resumption of operations at 122 

Placer Mining Methods and Costs in the Northern Gold 

Fields 40 

Platinum in British Columbia 172 

Port Hood Coal Company, Inverness County, C.B 108 

Prevost, Hon, J 75 

Princess Royal Gold Mining Co., Ltd 33 

Principle Governing Initial Title to Mineral Lands 144 

Prox-idence Mining Company 136 

Production of Mica in Canada 149 

Purington, C. W. , on Costs of Placer Mining in Alaska 40 

Pyrite Smelting, by T, A. Rickard 131 

Quebec's New Mineral Region, by J. E. Hardraan 9, 43 

Quebec Mining Notes 29, 60, 180 

Raymond, Dr. R. W., on The Principles governing initial 

titles to Mineral Lands 144 

Recent Developments at the Canada Corundum Go's Mill .... 77 

Richards, Prof. J. W., on Electro-metallurgy of iron 109 

Rickard, T. A 69 

Robertson, W. Fleet, on The Mines of Windy Arm 174 

Royalties in Ontario 36 

Royalties on Minerals in Ontario 2 

San Francisco Coal Market 58 

Share Market 33 66 

Shakespeare Gold Mining Company - 137 

Silver-Cobalt-Nickel Ores of the Temiskaming Mining Divi- 
sion 173 

Slough Creek Company loi 

Society of Chemical Industry, Meeting of 184 

Standard Asbestos Co. , Ltd 116 

Star of the East M. & D. Co., Meeting of 98 

Steam Shovels in Atlin District 54 

Steel, Bounties on 106 

Steel Rails, Bounty on 25 

Stewart River, Dredging on 3 

Tariff Commission in the Kootenays 74 

Technical Methods of Ore Analyses, by A. H. Low 131 

Temiskaming Silver Discoveries 2 

Templeman, Hon. Senator 5 

Title to Locations in Cobalt area 71 

Topographical Maps and Geological Field Work 72 

Toronto Globe and Cobalt Discoveries 4 

Tyee Copper Company, 6th. ordinary general meeting of 32 

Tyee Copper Company, Position of 36 

Tyee Copper Company, (special correspondence) 54 

United States, Iron and Steel Trade in 34 

Value of Topographical Maps and Geological Field Work .... 72 

War Eagle-Centre Star Amalgamation 184 

Western Canada Cement & Coal Co 61 

Western Iron Company 139 

Western Oil & Coal Co 139 

AVhy the Mineral Industry in Ontario has not progressed 170 

Windy Arm, Mines of, by W. Fleet Robertson 174 

Ymir 33 

Young's Lake Mining Company of Ontario 182 

Yukon, Change of Mining Regulations in 75 

Yukon Coal 54 

Yukon, Dredging in 140 

Yukon Mining Notes 32,' 62,' 105, 140 

Yukon Mining Operations — 1905 181 

Yukon, Proposed Revision of Mining Laws of 69 

Yukon, Water Shortage in 35 

Zinc Commission in British Columbia no 141 

Zinc, Electric Smelting of, by F. T. Snyder 83 

Zinc in British Columbia ] 105 

Zinc, Investigations in British Columbia, The 73 

Zinc Ores and the United States Tariff 1, 24, 53 

Zinc Reduction Plant at Frank .' '. . 105 

Zinc Resources of British Columbia 53 

Zinc Resources of British Columbia, Report on . . 25 



THE 



anac3ian5jlmmg ^Review 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



INDEX 



1905 

JULY-DECEMBER 



INDEX TO VOL. XXV. 



Adams, Dr. F. D., and the Directorship of the Geological 

Survey 108 

Alljerta, Coal in 3 

Alberta Coal Mining Notes : 64,102 

Alberta, Oil in 30 

American Zinc Duties 53 

Americans in Temiskaming 37 

Anglo Canadian Graphite Syndicate 21 

Anthracite Mining Costs . . ' 34 

Argall, Philip 53 

Asbestos Mining in Canada 151 

Asbestos Mining in Quebec 116 

Asbestos and Mica, Monographs on ] 44 

Atlin District, Steam Shovels in 54 

Atlin District, Season of 1905 in 108 

Beaver Valley Oil Company 139 

Big Bend District, B.C I73 

Big Four Company's Misrepresentations 70 

Big Dipper Mining Company, Meeting of 182 

Bloom, A Song of Cobalt 110 

Bounties on Coal Oil 34 

Bounties on Oil 106 

Bounties paid by Dominion Government 133 

Britannia Copper Syndicate, Meeting of 64 

Britannia Copper Mines 61 

British Columbia (special correspondence) 96,129 

British Columbia Coal Notes 32 

British Cohmibia Coal Mining Notes 63,102,138 

British Columbia Mining Notes 30, 61, 103, 139,'l80 

British Columbia Mining Notes (special correspondence) . . 174 

British Columbia Zinc Ores 1 

Bi-itish Columbia Zinc Resources 25 

Canada Gorundum Company's Mill, Recent Developments at, 77 

Canada Pig Iron Production in 57 

Canadian Copper, Smelter of 36 

Canadian Gold Fields Syndicate, Dividend 30 

Canadian Graphite Developments 123 

Canadian Metals Company 61 

Canadian-Mexican, Trade Developments of 184 

Canadian Minerals at Liege 53 

Canadian Mining, Revival in Ill 

Canadian Mining Institute, Officers and Council of 158 

Cariboo Consolidated 182 

Cariboo Consolidated, Ltd., Meeting of 164 

Cariboo Consolidated, Ltd., Extraordinary Meeting of 184 

Chibogamoo Mining Company 9^ 180 

Classes for Miners 38 

Coal Imports to San Francisco 58 

Coal in Newfoundland 58 

Coal Bounties 34 

Coal Supplies, Digest of Evidence for Royal Commission 57 

Coal Tests 25 

Cobalt 176 

Cobalt District, Invalidation of claims in 98 

Cobalt District, Market for Ores 143 

Coleman Township, Ont., Cobalt Silver in 70 

(Company Notes 33, 66, 101, 141, 184 

Co])per Hand-Book, The 57 

Copper Industry in Canada 7I 

Copper Min(!s of Lake Superior 57 

Copper mining & Smelting Co. of Ontario 61 

Copper Prices 54 

Copper, The World's Output of 34 

Cop])er Market Report 106 

(-oste, E., On proposed Revision of Ontario Mining Law 94 

(Jrow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Production of (half-year). . . 32 



Dalhousie University 33 

Department of Mines, A National 5 

Dillon-Mills, S., On occurrences of hematite North of Georgian 

l^ay 119 

Dismissal of Le Roi Director 95 

Dominion Iron & Steel Company, Annual Report of 134 

Dominion Government Bounties 133 

Dominion Steel Company, Financial Position of 102 

Dredging in the Yukon 140 

Drumtiiond, Dr. W. H no 

Eastern Coal Company, Maccan, N.S 182 

Eastern Ontario, Iron Pyrites in 14 

Electric Smelting of Iron 79 

Electric Smelting of Zinc Ores 83 

Electric Smelting and Newspaper Optimism (special corres- 
pondence) 93 

Electro Metallurgy of Iron, The 109 

Electrolytic Methods for producing bycalcic Phosphate 15 

Elk River Coal & Oil Company 65 

Eva Mining Company, B.C., Annual Meeting of 99 

Examination and Vahiation of Mines, by J. E. Hard- 
man 17, 90, 124 

Fergie, Chas., Address to 76 

Fort Francis, Ont., Iron Ranges North of , 35 

Forest Rose Mining Company 61 

Eraser, Graham, Retirement of 126 

Garde, A.C 53 

Geology of Western Ore Deposits 131 

Geological Survey of Canada, Economical Work in (1904). . . . 79 

Government by Order-in-Council in Ontario 38 

Government by Order-in-Council in Ontario (correspon- 
dence) 92 

Great Northern Mines, Ltd., Annual Meeting of 62 

Graphite Mining and Canadian Possibilities 146 

Granby Con. M. S. & P. Co., Report of HO 

Granby Con. M. S. & P. Co., Directors' Report of 137 

Granby Con. M. S. & P. Co., Extraordinary Meeting of 182 

Granby Company's Holdings at Phoenix 62 

Hall Mining & Smelting Company, Annual Report of 148, 177 

Hardman, J. E., on Examination and Valuation of Mines. 

17, 90, 124 

Hardman, J. E. , on Quebec's New Mineral Region 9 

Hastings Exploration Syndicates' dividend 62 

Hastings Exploration Syndicate, 7th. Annual Meeting of. . . . 65 

Hematite Deposits at Bell Island 109 

Hematite Occurrences North of Georgian Bay 119 

Hendryx Process at Nelson 54 

Hill Crest Coal & Coke Company, Prospectus of 3 

Hobart, F., on Mining Statistics 12 

Huntingdon^Heberlein Process 75 

Industrial Notes 33, 66, 106, 142, 183 

Ingalls, W. R 53 

Initial, Title to Mineral Lands, Principles governing 144 

Inspection of Claims of Cobalt 69 

Invalidation of claims in Cobalt District 98 

lowa-Lillooet Gold Mining Company 63 

Iron, Electric Smelting of 72 

Iron Ore Resources of Nova Scotia 22 

Iron Interests of Nova Scotia 107 

Iron and Steel Trade in the United States 34 

Iron Ores of Nictaux and Torbrook, Analysis of 50 



Iron Ores of Nova, Scotia, Torbrook and Xictaux 47 

Iron Pyrites in Eastern Ontario 14 

Joint Stock Mining Companies, Law of 7 

Jones, Mr. F. P., New General Manager of the Dominion Iron 

& Steel Company 146 

King Edward Mines, 2 

Kootenays, The, Mining in (special correspondence) 28 

Lake Superior, Copper Mines of 57 

Lake Superior, Corporation 109 

Lake Superior, Corporation, Annual Report of 99, 135 

Law, Joint Stock Mining Company's 7 

Lawrence, Dr 35 

Lead Poisoning, Prevention of 36 

Le Roi (special correspondence) 95 

Le Roi and Mr. McMillan [[[ 2 

Lp Roi Circulars 112 

Le Roi Amalgamation. I70 

Le Roi Squabble, The 71 

Liege, Canadian Exhibition at, translated from the German 

by F. Cirkel 39 

Liege, Canadian Minerals at 53 

Lightning Creek Gold Gravel & Dredging Co 139 

Londonderry Iron Ore Deposits 23 

Manitouian Island, Occurrences of Oil on 108 

Maritime Coal & Railway Company, Ltd 87 

Market for Ores from Cobalt District 143 

McKay, J., on Ontario Mining Law 51 

McKinley Mines, Ltd., Annual Meeting of 182 

McMillan, A. J., and Le Roi Mine 2 

Metal Market Conditions 37 

Mica in Canada, Production of -. 149 

Mines Branch Department of the Interior 144 

Mining Exhibit at Halifax 99 

Mining Interest in Canada, Rehabilitation of 108 

Mining Law Revision in Yukon 69 

Mining Men and Affairs 25, 55, 99, 132, 179 

Mining and Metallurgical Patents 171, 67 

Mining Statistics 101, 133, 180 

Mining Statistics, by Hobart 12 

Mining Incorporations, Ontario 141, 182 

Mining Incorporations, British Columbia 142, 183 

Montreal & Boston 33 

New Fairvievv Corporation 141 

Newfoundland Coal 58 

Newfoundland Gold Mining in 98 

Nictaux and Torbrook, Iron Ores of 50 

North Bay, Government Smelter at 35 

Nova Scotia Coal Notes 31, 182 

Nova Scotia Iron Ores of Torbrook and Nictaux 47 

Nova Scotia Coal Mining Notes . 137, 63 

Nova Scotia Coal Mining Notes (special correspondence). . 101, 131 

Nova Scotia Coal and the Ontario Market 141 

Nova Scotia Iron Ores 5 

Nova Scotia Iron Ores, Resources of 22 

Nova Scotia Gold Mines — 29 

Nova Scotia Mining Notes 29, 60 102, 138, 182 

Nova Scotia Mining Notes (special correspondence 59 

Nova Scotia Mineral and Coal Production, Jan'y. to June .... 99 

Nova Scotia Mining Areas Applied for in November 179 

Nova Scotia Mining Society's Semi-annual Meeting 173 

Occurrences of hematite North of Little Current, Georgian 

Bay 119 

Officers and Council of Canadian Institute, 1905-6, 158 

Ogilvie Gold Dredging Co., Ltd 3 

Ogilvie, William 3 

Oil in the West II3 

Ontario, Bureau of Mines, Report of 173 

Ontario Concerning Mining Titles in 167 

Ontario, Mines Act Amendment of 168 

Ontario Mining Intelligence (special correspondence) 27 

Ontario Mining Law, Proposed Amendments to 51, 52 

Ontario Mining Laws', Proposed Revision of 70, 114, 127 

Ontario Mining Notes 29, 60, 103, 138, 181 

Ontario Mining Notes (special correspondence) 178 

Ontario Mining News (special correspondence) 59, 97, 130 

Ontario Miners' Meeting 175, 128, 144 



Ontario Proposed Mining Royalties 36 

Ontario Royalties on Minerals 2 

Pig Iron Production in Canada 57 

Pilot Bay Smelter, Resumption of operations at 122 

Placer Mining Methods and Costs in the Northern Gold 

Fields 40 

Platinum in British Columbia 172 

Port Hood Coal Company, Inverness County, C.B 108 

Prevost, Hon, J 75 

Princess Royal Gold Mining Co., Ltd 33 

Principle Governing Initial Title to Mineral Lands 144 

Providence Mining Company 136 

Production of Mica in Canada 149 

Purington, C. W. , on Costs of Placer Mining in Alaska 40 

Pyrite Smelting, by T, A. Rickard 131 

Quebec's New Mineral Region, by J. E. Hardman 9, 43 

Quebec Mining Notes 29, 60, 180 

Raymond, Dr. R. W., on The Principles governing initial 

titles to Mineral Lands 144 

Recent Developments at the Canada Corundum Go's Mill ... 77 

Richards, Prof. J. W., on Electro-metallurgy of iron 109 

Rickard, T. A 59 

Robertson, W. Fleet, on The Mines of Windy Arm 174 

Royalties in Ontario 36 

Royalties on Minerals in Ontario 2 

San Francisco Coal Market 58 

Share Market 33 66 

Shakespeare Gold Mining Company 137 

Silver-Cobalt-Nickel Ores of the temiskaming Mining Divi- 
sion 173 

Slough Creek Company loi 

Society of Chemical Industry, Meeting of 184 

Standard Asbestos Co., Ltd HQ 

Star of the East M. & D. Co., Meeting of 98 

Steam Shovels in Atlin District 54 

Steel, Bounties on 106 

Steel Rails, Bounty on 25 

Stewart River, Dredging on * 3 

Tariff Commission in the Kootenays 74 

Technical Methods of Ore Analyses, by A. H. Low 131 

Temiskaming Silver Discoveries 2 

Templeman, Hon. Senator 5 

Title to Locations in Cobalt area 71 

Topographical Maps and Geological Field Work 72 

Toronto Globe and Cobalt Discoveries 4 

Tyee Copper Company, 6th. ordinary general meeting of 32 

Tyee Copper Company, Position of 36 

Tyee Copper Company, (special correspondence) 54 

United States, Iron and Steel Trade in 34 

Value of Topographical Maps and Geological Field Work .... 72 

War Eagle-Centre Star Amalgamation 184 

Western Canada Cement & Coal Co [ 61 

Western Iron Company 139 

Western Oil & Coal Co 139 

Why the Mineral Industry in Ontario has not progressed. 170 

Wmdy Arm, Mines of, by W. Fleet Robertson 174 

Ymir 33 

Young's Lake Mining Company of Ontario 182 

Yukon, Change of Mining Regulations in 75 

Yukon Coal 

Yukon, Dredging in • ■ • ■ . 

Yukon Mining Notes . 32,' 62,' 105, 140 

Yukon Mmmg Operations — 1905 igl 

Yukon, Proposed Revision of Mining Laws of 69 

Yukon, Water Shortage in [ ] 35 

Zinc Commission in British Columbia no 141 

Zinc, Electric Smelting of, by F. T. Snyder ['. . ' 83 " 

Zinc in British Columbia 105 

Zinc, Investigations in British Columbia, The 73 

Zinc Ores and the United States Tariff 1 ' 24 53 

Zinc Reduction Plant at Frank 105 

Zinc Resources of British Columbia 53 

Zinc Resources of British Columbia, Report on. ............ 25 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



i 



Westinghouse Motors 

For nine Work 

Increase Production 
Decrease Costs 

Westinghouse Motor-Driven mining machinery is 
effecting economies in operation and increasing pro- 
duction to such a marked degree, that mines adhering 
to the old methods of driving are becoming the excep- 
tion; they find they cannot compete with plants having 
modern equipments. 

Canadian Westing^house Co., Limited 

General Office and Works: HAMILTON, ONT. 

For particulars address nearest office 

Lawlor Bldg., Kina and Yonge Sts. Sovereign Bank of Canada BIdg. 

Toronto Hamilton flontreal 

152 Hastings Street 922-923 Union Bank Bids. 134 Granville Street 

Vancouver Winnipeg Halifax 





DIAMOND DRILLS 

Our Drills are of the latest design and represent the 
highest point of perfection yet reached. Operated by 
hand power, horse power, steam, air, and electricity. 
Send for Catalogue. 

STANDARD DIAMAND DRILL CO. 

Chamber of Commepce Building-, Chicago, U.S.A. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co. 

L I M I T E: 

PROPRIETORS, MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF 

Sydney IV|ines Bituminous Coal 

UnexceUed Fuel for Steamships and Locomotives, 
Manufactories, Rolling Mills, Forges, Glass Works, 
Brick and Lime Burning, Coke, Gas Works, and 
tor the Manufacture of Steel, Iron, etc. : : : : 

COLLIERIES AT SYDNEY MINES, CAPE BRETON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



HAMMERED AND ROLLED STEEL 

FOR MINING PURPOSES 

"^^'IftooT^^ cu"*^® Bevelled Steel Screen bars, Forged 

Steel Stamper Shoes and Dies, Blued Machinery Steel V.' to %" Diameter; sfeel 
It?«. ^K* ^^'■T^i'^' C-^^^ Bar Steel, Wedge Steel, Hammer Steel, Pick 

rtrue^o^^.'JSorptrt^Trnl TLh': "^'^'^^ compressed Shafting.' .^^t^ 



A FULL STOCK OF 



MILD FLAT, RIVET-ROUND & ANGLE STEELS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 

Special Attention Paid to Miners' Requirements. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



STEEL WORKS and Head Office: NEW GLASGOW, N.S, 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



iii 



COAL 

DOMINION COAL CO., LTD 

GLACE BAY, C.B., CANADA 

MINERS OF 



BITUMINOUS COALS 

The celebrated "Reserve" 
coal for Household use. 



INTERNATIONAL" GAS COAL 

And the best steam coal from its 
ColUeres on the Phalen seam. 



YEARLY OUTPUT 3,500,000 TONS 




Shipping facilities at Sydney and Louisburg, C.B., of most modem type. Steamers carrying 5,000 tons loaded in twenty- 
four hours. Special attention given to quick loading of sailing vessels, small vessels loaded with quickest despatch. 

BUNKER COAL 

The Dominion Coal Company has provided unsurpassed facilities for bunkering ocean-going steamers with despatch. Specia 
attention given to prompt loading. Steamers of any size are bunkered without detention. 

By improved screening appliances, lump coal for domestic trade is supplied, of superior quality. 
Prices, terms, etc., may be obtained at the offices of the Company. 

ALEXANDER DICK, General Sales Agent, Glace Bay, C.B. 

DOMUnON COAL COMPANY, Limited, 112 St. James Street, Montreal, Que. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, 171 Lower Water Street, Halifax, N.S. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, Quebec, Que. 

AND FROM THE FOLLOWING AGENTS : 



R. P. & W. F. STARR, St. John, N.B. 

PEAKE BROS. & CO., Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

HULL, BLYTH & CO., 4 Fenchurch Avenue, London, E.C. 



J. E. HARLOW, 95 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 
HARVEY & CO., St. Johns, Newfoundland. 
A. JOHNSON & CO., Stockhohn, Sweden. 



G. H. DUGGAN, Third Vice-President. 



iv 



THE CANADIAN MIMING REVIEW. 




RUBBER GOODS 



THE MARK OF QUALITY 

When you see this Trade Mark 
on a Rubber Article — 

IT'S RIGHT. 



The Canadian Rubber 
GoMPANYOF Montreal 

(LIIVIITED) 
Sales Branches and Warehouses : 

172 Granville St. HALIFAX, N,S. 

Imperial Bank BIdg.. MONTREAL, Que. 
Front & Vonge Sts. - TORONTO, Ont. 
Princess Street - WINNIPEG, Man 
Cordova Street - VANCOUVER, B.C 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 



FOR MINING PURPOSES 

Rubber Belting, Fire Hose. Steam and Air Hose, High Pressure 
Star Red " Sheet Pack ng, Valve and Piston Packings, Sheave 
and Pulley Fillings, Rubber Bumpers, and Springs, Rubber 
Clothing and Boots, Etc. 







View of Factories, Montreal, Quebec. Floor area, 21 acres. 



John A. Roebling's Sons Company 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



OF NEW YORK 



HIGHEST GRADE WIRE ROPE 

OF ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



ELECTRICAL WIRES OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 




117-121 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK CITY -:- NEW YORK 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



V 



WALKER BROTHERS (WiGAN) Limited 

WIGAN, EINGl-AND 



Largest Air Compressors in Canada 

are of WALKER BROTHERS (Wigan) LIMITED manufacture. 



THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES HAVE INSTALLED WALKER BROTHERS AIR COMPRESSORS, 
IN CAPACITIES RANGING UP TO 6300 CUBIC FEET OF FREE AIR PER MINUTE, ALL 
OF WHICH ARE PROVIDED WITH WALKER PATENT AIR VALVES. 



Dominion Coal Company Ltd. 
Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. 
Intercolonial Coal Mining Co. Ltd. 



Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company Ltd. 

Belmont Gold Mine Ltd. 

Cape Breton Coal, Iron & Railway Co. Ltd. 



Sole Canadian q p- gk ^% ^\ ^\ O O ^N^H Li r O Canada Life Building 

Representatives r^t-MWwWfV DMvJ I rlLr^O MONTREAL, P.Q. 



vi 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



BY THE LINES OF THE 

Canadian 
Pacific 
Railway 

All important points in Canada and the United 
States can be reached. 

Fast Trains 

To Quebec, the Laurentians, Eastern Town- 
ships, St. John, N.B., Halifax, Boston, Wor- 
cester, Springfield, Mass., New York, Portland, 
Me., and the principal Atlantic Seaside resorts, 
Kawartha Lakes, Toronto, Niagara Falls, De- 
troit, Chicago, Ottawa, the Temiskaming, Mis- 
sissaga,French River, New Ontario, Sault Ste. 
Marie, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Winnipeg and 
the Western Prairies, the Kootenay Mining 
regions, the Mountains of British Columbia- 
unrivalled for scenic grandeur — Vancouver and 
the Pacific Coast. 

Fast Steamship 
Service 

On the Upper Lakes, Owen Sound to Fort 
William, on the inland waters of British Col- 
umbia, on the Pacific Coast to China, Japan, 
Australia, via Honolulu and Suva, and to 
Skagway en route to the Yukon. The fastest 
and most luxuriously furnished steamers be- 
tween Victoria, Vancouver and Seattle, and on 
the Atlantic Ocean between Bristol, London, 
Liverpool, Montreal and Quebec, in summer, 
and St. John in winter. 

Double Daily 
Transcontinental 
Train Service 

During summer months, and Daily Transcon- 
tinental Service during winter months. 

For illustrated pamphlets apply to any Can- 
adian Pacific Railway Agent, or to 

c. E. Mcpherson, c. e. e. ussher, 

General Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, 

Western Lines, Eastern Lines, 

WINNIPEG, Man. MONTREAL. 
ROBERT KERR, 

Passenger Traffic Manager, 

MONTREAL. 



SCHOOL OF MINING 

AFFILIATED TO 
QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY 

Kingston, Ontario 



THE FOLLOWING COURSES <BE OFFERED 

1 . Three Years' Course for a Diploma in 

(a) Mining Engineering and Metallurgy. 

(b) Chemistry and Mineralogy. 

(c) Mineralogy and Geology. 

(d) Chemical Engineering. 

(e) Civil Engineering. 

if) Mechanical Engineering. 

(g) Electrical Engineering. 

(h) Biology and Public Health, and 

2. Four Years' Course for a Degree (B.Sc.) in 

the same. 

3 . Courses in Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geol- 

ogy for degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

For futher information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

4. Post-Graduate Course for the Degree of 

Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) 

For further information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

rr^HE SCHOOL is provided with well equipped 
laboratories for the study of Chemical Analysis, 
Assaying, Blow-piping, Mineralogy, Petrography "and 
Drawing. It has also a well equipped Mechanical 
Laboratory. The Engineering Building is provided 
with modern appliances for the study of mechanical 
and electrical engineering. The Mineralogy, Geology 
and Physics BuUding offers the best facilities for the 
theoretical and practical study of those subjects. 
The Mining Laboratory has been remodelled at a cost 
of some $12,000, and the operations of crushing, 
cyaniding, etc., can be studied on a large scale. 

The school is prepared to make a limited number 
of mill runs on gold ores in lots of 2 to 20 tons during 
the months of September, October and November, 
and will undertake concentrating test on large lots of 
ore from December to March. 

For Calendar of the School and 
further information apply to 

The Secretary, School of Mining, 
Kingston, Ont. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



vii 



The Bank of British North America 

Established in 1836. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter in 1840. 
CAPITAL PAID UP - - - • $4,866,667 

RESERVE FUND . . - ■ . 2,044,000 

LONDON OFFICE: 5 GRACECHURCH STREET, E.C. 
COURT OF DIRECTORS 
J.H.Brodie M.G.C.Glyn H.J. B. Kendall 



J.J.Carter R.H.Glyn F.Lubbock 

H. R. Farrer E. A. Hoare Geo. D. Whatman 

A. G. Wallis, Secretary. W. S. Goldby, Manager. 

HEAD OFFICE IN CANADA, ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL. 

H. Stikeman, Gen. Manager. J. FJmsly, Supt. of Branches. 

H. B. Mackenzie, Inspector. 

BRANCHES IN CANADA: 

Montreal, A. E. Ellis, Loc. Mgr. 



Ontario 
London 

Market Sub-bch. 
Brantford 
Hamilton 
Barton St .Sub-bch. 
Toronto 

Toronto Junction 
Toronto Junction 
" Stock Yards 
Weston (Sub-bch) 
Midland 
Fenelon FaUs 
Bobcaygeon 
Campbellford 
Kingston 
Ottawh 



Qdebec 
Montreal 

" St. Catherine St. 
Longueuil (Sub-bch) 
Quebec 

Levis (Sub-branch) 

New Brunswick 
St. John 

St. John, Union St. 
Fredericton 

Nova Scotia 
Halifax 

Manitoba 
Winnipeg 
Brandon 
RestoD 



J. R. Ambrose, Sub. Mgr. 

N. W. Territories 
Battleford 
Calgary 
Duck Lake 
Estevan 
Rosthem 
York ton 

British Columbia 
Ashcroft 
Greenwood 
Kaslo 
Rossland 

Trail (Sub-branch) 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Yukon Terr. 
Dawson 



AGENCIES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

New^York (52 Wall St.) — W. Lawson and J. C. Welsh, Agents. 
SaniFrancisco (120 Sansome St.) — H. M. J. McMichael and A. S. Ireland. 
Agents 

Chicago — Merchants Loan & Trust Co. 

London Bankers — The Bank of England and Messrs. Glyn & Co. 

Foreign Agents — Liverpool — Bank of Liverpool. Scotland — National 
Bank of Scotland, Limited, and branches. Ireland — Provincial Bank of 
Ireland, Limited, and branches; National Bank, Limited, and branches. 
Australia — Union Bank of Australia, Ltd. New Zealand- — Union Bank of 
Australia, Ltd. India, China and Japan — Mercantile Bank of India, Ltd. 
West Indies — Colonial Bank. Paris— Credit Lyonnais. Lyons— Credit 
Lyonnais. Agents in Canada for the Colonial Bank, London, and West 
Indies. 

i^Issues Circular Notes for Travellers available in all parts of the 
World. Drafts on South Africa and West Indies may be obtained at the 
Bank's Branches. 



The Canadian Dank 
of Commerce 

PAID UP CAPITAL $10,000,000 REST $4,500,000 

Head Office: TORONTO 



B. E. WALKER, General Manager 

ALEX. LAIRD, Ass't Gen'l Manager. 



Branches throughout Canada and in the United States and 
England, Including the following: 



Atlin 


Nelson 


Seattle 


Cobalt 


New Glasgow 


Skagway 


Cranbrook 


Ottawa 


Springhill 


Dawson 


Parry Sound 


Sydney 


Fernie 


Penticton 


Toronto 


Greenwood 


Port Arthur 


Vancouver 


Halifax 


Portland, Ore. 


Victoria 


Ladysmith 


Princeton 


White Horse 


Montreal 


San Francisco 


Winnipeg 


Nanaimo 


Sault Ste. Marie 





NEW YORK: 16 Exchange Place 
LONDON, England: 60 Lombapd St., E.C. 

A branch has recently been opened at COBALT, in][the 
newly-discovered silver mining camp in New Ontario. 



STANLEY 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF SURVEYING AND DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS IN THE WORLD. MAKERS TO 
THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. 




>- 

(C 

< 



X 
D 



U 
0. 

o 

o 

(0 
u 
-J 

h 



(0 
u (0 



■ 

< 
a 
z 

3 
Q 



O 
Z 
< 

OL 
O 
h 




telescope on top 



telescope at side 



For vertical sighting it is also most useful and accurate, as by trans- 
ferring the lines of both positions of auxiliary, two lines at right angles to 
each other are transferred down a shaft which, if produced, will intersect 
each other exactly under the centre of the instrument, and no allowance 
or calculation whatever has to be made to ascertain the centre. 



Price List post free. 



Cablegrams: "TURNSTILE, LONDON.' 



Great Turnstile, HOLBORN, LONDON, 
ENGLAND. 




6.L.BERGER&S0NS 

37 William Street 
BOSTON, Mass. 

Successors to BUFF & BERGER. 

SP^CIAIVTIES : 
Standard Instruments and 
Appliances for 

Mining, Subway, 
Sewer, Tunnel, 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

SE^^RCAT^^ Underground Work. 

GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM 

THE SHORT FAVORITE ROUTE 

BETWEEN Ottawa and Montreal 

Sunday Train Both Directions 
PULLMAN BUFF PARLOR CARS 

Montreal with Trains for QUEBEC, HALIFAX, PORTLAND 

And all Points EAST and SOUTH. 

L^L^Z™ OTTAWA, NEW YORK AND BOSTON 

And all NEW ENGLAND POINTS. 

Through Buffet Sleeping Cars between Ottawa and flew York. 

Baggage checked to all points and passed by customs in transit. 
For tickets, time tables and information, apply to nearest ticket agent of 
this company or connecting lines. 

Q. T. Bell, Gen'l Pass, and Ticket Agent. 



Vlii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



The JOHN McDOUGALL Caledonian Iron Works Go. Limited. 



MONTREIAL. 




PATENTED 

EIGHT INCH, TWO 
STAGE TURBINE. 



Belt driven from a Water Wheel 
and used for Placer Mining, 
Capacity 1,750 gallons per mi- 
nute against 170 feet head. 



We manufacture for sale and on order PUMPS and PUMPING ENGINES for liquids, air and gas ; Con- 
densers, Cooling Towers and other apparatus and machinery under all Canadian Letters & Patent owned and 
controlled by the International Steam Pump Co. and its Companies, including the following Patents,— 

47168 62005 74319 76519 77655 81034 84108 86516 89242 
52155 70612 75069 76520 79001 82040 84109 86517 
53629 73076 75359 77066 80482 82041 86288 89241 



SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL SCIENCE 



TOROINJTO 



Established 



1878 



THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 




Departments of Instruction: 

1 — Civil Engineering. 4 — Architecture. 

2 — Mining Engineering. 5 — Analytical and Applied 

3 — Mechanical and Electrical Chemistry. 

Engineering. 6 — Chemical Engineering. 

Special attention is directed to tiie facilities possessed by tlie school 
for giving instruction in Mining Engineering. 

Laboratories: 

1 — Chemical. 3— Milling and 4 — Steam. 6 — Electrical. 

2 — Assaying Ore Treatment 5 — Meteorological 7 — Testing. 

A Calendar giving full information, and including a list showing the 
positions held by graduates, sent on application. 

A. T. LAING, Registrar. 



CANADIAN MINING INSTITUTE 

Incorporated by Act of Parliament 1898. 

AIMS AND objects. 

(A) To promote the Arts and Sciences connected with the 
economical production oif valuable minerals and metals, by 
means of meetings for the reading and discussion of technical 
papers, and the subsequent distribution of such information as 
may be gained through the medium of publications. 

(B) The establishment of a central reference librarj' and a 
headquarters for the purpose of this organization. 

(C) To take concerted action upon such matters as affect 
the mining and metallurgical industries of the Dominion of Canada. 

(D) To encourage and promote these industries by all law- 
ful and honourable means. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members shall be persons engaged in the direction and 
operation of mines and metallurgical works, mining engineers, 
geologists, metallurgists, or chemists, and such other persons as 
the Council may see fit to elect. 

Student Members shall include persons who are qualifying 
themseh es for the profession of mining or metallurgical engineer- 
ing, students in pure and applied science in any technical school 
in the Dominion, and such other persons, up to the age of 25 
years, who shall be engaged as apprentices or assistants in mining, 
metallurgical or geological work, or who may desire to participate 
in the benefits of the meetings, librarj' and publications of the 
Institute. Student members shall be eligible for election as 
Members ofter the age of 25 years. 

SUBSCRIPTION. 

Member's yearly, subscription $10.00 

Student Member's do 2 . 00 

PUBLICATIONS . 

Vol. 1, 1898. 66 pp . out of print Vol. V, 1902. 700 pp., bound. 

Vol. II. 1899. 285 pp., bound red cloth Vol. VI, 1903. 520 pp., bound. 
Vol. III. 1900, 270 pp., bound red cloth Vol. VII, 1904, 530 pp., bound. 
Vol. IV, 1901, .333 pp., bound. 

Membership in the Canadian Mining Institute is open to 
everyone interested in promoting the profession and industry of 
mining without qualification or restrictions. 

Forms of application for membership, and copies of the 
Journal of the Institute, etc., may be obtained upon application to 

H. MORTIMER-LAMB, Secretary, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



IX 



FLORY HOISTING ENGINES 

STEIAM AND EILEICTRIC 

Are designed for " STRENUOUS " duty. In Mines, Quarries, "P"F^ 
and the various requirements for Contractors : Pile Driving, ^ f"j 
Bridge Building, and general Hoisting purposes saS^fctiifiiil^ '^'.f 'j 

The FLORY TRAMWAY and CABLEWAY SYSTEM is unequalled 

Slate Mining and 
Working Machinery. 

SALES AGENTS : 

I. MATHESON & CO., 

New Glasgow; N. S 

W. H C. MUSSEN & CO.; 

Montreal. 

S. Flory Mfg. Go. 

Office and Works: BANGOR, Pa, U.S.A. 





ASK FOR OUR CATALOGUES. 



UNITED STATES 



STEEL PRODUCTS EXPORT CO. 



NEW YORK." Battery Park BIdg. MONTREAL! Bankof Ottawa Bidg. 

IRON AND STEEL WIRE ROPE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

wire: rore tramways 

AND 

cable: hoist-conveiyors 
RUBBER AND PAPER INSULATED COPPER WIRE AND CABLES 

WRITE FOR OUR CATALOGUES 

MORRIS MACHINE WORKS 

BALDWINSVILLE, N.Y. 

Centrifugral Pumpingr Machinery for 
Various industrial Purposes. 

We are building a special solid steel lined 
pump for handling tailings or slimes in gold 
mining. Estimates furnished upon apphca- 
tion for pumping outfits for special purposes. 
Write for catalogue. 

New York office— 39-41 Cortlandt St. 

AGBNCI^S 

Henion & Hubbell, 61-69 North JefiFerson Street, Chicago, 111. 
Harron, Rickard & McCone, San Francisco, Cal. ^immerman-Wells-Brown Co., Portland Oregon, 

H. W. Petrie, Toronto, Ont. 




X 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



C. E. Macphebson 
Sec.-Treas. 



For Miners 
Pit-Sinkers 



For Qdarrymen 
contractohb 



©NTARI0 POWDER e©. Ltd. 

I 15 Brock Street, KINGSTON, ONT. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

DYNAMITE, EXPLOSIVES 

ELECTRIC BLASTING APPARATUS, FUSE, CAPS, &,c. 
ELECTRIC BLASTINC APPARATUS ^^^-^^^Sl"" = 

Victor Electric Platinum Fuses. 

Superior to all others for exploding any make of dynamite or blasting powder 
iiach b use b olded separately and packed in neat paper boxes of 50 each. AU tested 
and warranted. Single and double strength with any length of wires. 

Blasting Machines. 

The strongest and most powerful machines ever made for Electric Blasting 
I hey are especially adapted for submarine blasting, large railroad quarrying and 
mining works. jo: 

Victor Blasting Machine 

Fires 5 to 8 holes ; weighs 15 lbs.; adapted for prospecting, etc. 

Insulated Wires and Tapes, Blasting Caps, Fuse, etc. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 
MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

MACBETH FUSE WORKS 

POMPTON LAKES, NEW JERSEY. 





HAMILTON POWDER COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Explosives 

Office : 4 Hospital Street, MontreaL Branch Offices Throughout Canada. 



W. T. RODDEN, Managing Director. 



J. F. JOHNSON, Secretary-Treasurer. 



STANDARD EXPLOSIVES 



LIM 



Manufacturers of High Explosives, and Dealers 
in Blasting Powder, Safety Fuse Detonators, 
Batteries, Electrical Fuses, etc. 



OFFICE : 
Board of Trade Building:* IVIontreal. 



WORKS: 
lie Perrot, near Vaudreuil, P.Q. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xi 



HOW YOU CAN INCREASE 
YOUR ORE VALUES 



If your ore concentrates contain 
iron pyrites, our magnetic Separator 
will extract the iron, thus making the 
concentrates much more valuable. 
Send us a sample of your ore, and 
we will test some gratis. 

We want to send you catalog 
"H" Ask for it. 



United Iron Works 
Company — 

Springfield, Mo., U.S.A. 



CHROME STEEL WORKS 

CHROME. N.J..U.S.A. 

croKMrniv or nitooKLVN . N.^O , 



FOR DRY OR WET CRUSHIN G! 

TRADE 

ROLLED mmmi CHROME 

MARK 

STEEL 
SHELLS AND RINGS 




Forged, punched and rolled from a Solid Chrome Steel Ingot 

BEST MATERIAL FOR 

Shells for Cornish Rolls, Rings and Tires for 
ChiHan Mills, Rings for Huntington Mills. 




Send for Illustrated 

Pamphlet 
"RoUed Shells and 
Rings" 



^^^^^^ 
^^^^^^ 




THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL 

For Reduction of all classes of Ore 




PATENTED \H THE FOLLOWING COUNTRIES: 

DOMINION OF CANADA 



United States 
Mexico 
New Zealand 
Japan 
Russia 



Great Britain 
South African Colonies 
Germany- 
New South Wales 
Victoria 



British India 
Tasmania 
Queensland 
South Australia 
West Australia 



A few reasons why the ELSPASS MILL is displacing 
all other crushers : 

Practically no slimes ; more lineal feet screen surface 
than any other mill ; less horse-power to operate than 
any other mill of the same capacity ; cost of erection 
very low ; occupies very little space ; will save your free 
coarse gold in the mill without the use of mercury ; per- 
fect panning motion, die revolving and rollers remaining 
stationary ; 30 to 60 tons of ore treated per day ; costs 
very little for repairs. 



The Elspass Mill. 



Adopted by the U.S. Government and installed in the 
new mint at Denver. 



Liberal Discount to Supply Houses. 



CANADA FOUNDRY CO., TORONTO 

Manufactupeps fop the Canadian Tpade. 

THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL AND MFC. CO., 



Address for terms and particulars 



Xll 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



PUMPING MACHINERY 

FOR MINES AND WATERWORKS 




3 SETS OF GEARED THREE-THROW HORIZONTAL RAM PUMPS 

9 RAMS EACH 10 INS. DIAMETER X 20 INS. STROKE. 



Hathorn Davey & Co. Ltd. 



LEEDS, ENGLAND. 



Sole Canadian 
Representatives 



PEACOCK BROTHERS 



Canada Life Buildings 
IMONTREAL. 



ROBERT MEREDITH & CO. 

57 St. Francois Xavier St., MONTREAL 

Stock Brokers. Dealers in Mining and Indus- 
trial Shares. Companies Formed and Floated. 

Private Wire Connection with 

ZIMMERMANN &. FORSHAY, New York. 



ARE YOU CONFRONTED WITH A DIF- 
FICULT ORE-SEPARATING PROBLEM? 

THE WETHERILL MAGNETIC SEPARATING PROCESS 

MAY PROVE THE SOLUTION. 

For information and for Illustrated Phamphlet, apply to 

WETHERILL SEPARATINB CO., 52 Broadway, New Yorit. 

GOLD MEDAL awarded at the WORLD'S FAIR, ST. LOITig, MO. 
Mfg. Agents for Canada. ROBERT GARDNER ft SON, Montreal. P.Q. 



Blaisdell Cyanide Vat Excavating and Distributing Machinery 

Blaisdell Machinery solves the problem of abolishing unskilled labour from Cyanide Plants, and provides the final 
ir^/l.^'t'l orf^*'^" mechanical method of handhng ore between the mine and the dump, and effects a having of from 50 
per cent, to 90 per cent, in operative expenses. o^vmg oi irom ou 



THE JOHN McDOUGALL CALEDONIAN IRON WORKS CO. Ltd., Montreal 

Sole Manufacturers in Canada of this machinery under Canadian Patents No. 81,954 and No. 86,862. Send for Catalogue. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xiii 



THE CROW'S NEST PASS COAL 
CO., LIMITED. 

OFFICES 

MANNING ARCADE, TORONTO. 
§ FERNIE, BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Gold iledal — Coal and Coke — Lewis & Clark Exposition 1905. 

Silver Medal — Coal and Coke — Paris Universal Exposition 1900. 

Alines and Coke Ovens at Fernie, Coal Creek Michel and 
Carbonado. 

Annual Capacity of Mines 2,000,000 tons. Coke Ovens 
500,000 tons. 



We are shipping domestic coal to points in Manitoba, Al- 
berta, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Montana, Washington 
and Idaho, a territory of over 400,000 square miles, and WE 
ARE GIVING SATISFACTION. 

W e are shipping steam coal from Winnipeg to the Pacific 
Coast, and not only is it used in that vast area by the Railways 
and the largest firms, but also by the Great Northern Steamship 
Company's liners plying between Seattle and the Orient. 

Our Michel Blacksmith coal is used in Railway forging 
shops in Winnipeg, seven hundred miles East, and in Vancouver 
four hundred miles West. 

Ask a British Columbia smelter Superintendent what coke 
he uses and what coke gives him best satisfaction. 

OUR ANALYSES SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

R. G. DRINNAN, G. G. S. LINDSEY, 

.Superintendent. General Man.ager. 



LUDWIG NAUEN 

Hamburg', Germany 



CONTINENTAL AGENT AND BUYER FOR 

ASBESTOS CRUDE AND EIBRE ALL GRADES 

Actinolite, Talc, Corundum 
Mica, Molybdenite, 

AND OTHER MINERALS. 



SPRINGHILL COAL 

THE CUMBERLAND RAILWAY & CDAL CO. 

Are prepared to deliver this well known 
Steam Coal at all points on the lines of 
G. T. R., C. P. R., and I. C. Railway. 

Head Office: 107 St. James St., MONTREAL 

ADDRESS, P.O. BOX 396. 



DOMINION BRIDGE CO., LTD., MONTREAL, P.Q. 

BRIDGES 



TURNTABLES, ROOF TRUSSES 
STEEL BUILDINGS 
ELECTRIC and HAND POWER CRANES 
Structural METAL WORK of all kinds 



BEAMS, CHANNELS, ANGLES, PLATES, ETC-r IN STOCK 



MILLING AND MINING MACHINERY 

Shafting, Pulleys, Gearing, Hangers, Boilers, Engines, Steam 
Pumps, Chilled Car Wheels and Car Castings. Brass an d Iron 
Castings of Every Description. Light and Heavy Forgings. 



ALEX. FLECK LTD., Ottawa. 



xiv 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Directory of Mining Engineers, Cliemists, Assayers, Etc. 



JOHN E. HARDMAN 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER 

ROOM 10 

171 ST. JAMES STREET 
MONTREAL 

MILTON L. HERSEY, M.Sc. 

(McGiU) 

Consulting Chemist of the C.P.R. 

Official Assayer Appointed for Province 
OF Quebec. 

146 St. James Street, MONTREAL 

ASSAYS OF ORES. 

Chemical and Physical Tests of all 
Materials. 

mineral properties examined . 
DR. J. T. DONALD 

{Official Analyst to the Dominion Government.) 

ANALYTICAL CHEMIST & ASSAYER 

112 St. Francois-Xavier Street 

MONTREAL. 

Analysis, Assaying, Cement Testing, 
etc. Mining Properties Examined. 

DIRECTOR OF laboratories: 

R. H.D. BENN, f.c.s. 

S. DILLON-MILLS, M. Ex. 

SPECIALTIES: 

Minerals of Huronian and Laurentian 
areas. 

Twenty years' experience superintending 
furnaces and mines. 

538 Huron Street 
TORONTO - - - - ONTARIO. 

WM. BLAKEMORE 

MINING 
ENGINEER 

Consultation. Reports. Development. 



FRITZ CIRKEL 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER. 

Twenty years' experience in Explora- 
tory Work and Mining in Germany, 
Eastern and Central Canada, British 
Columbia and the Pacific States. 

Examination of Mines. 
Office, 80:Stanley St., MONTREAL, Can. 



Cards in this' space cost only 
$15 pel year." 



NELSON 



B.C. 



H. F. E. GAMM, Mem. D.LA.E. 

Mining Engineer. 

Gen. Manager, Ontario Mining & Smelting^Co. 

Mines examined. Mills designed. 
Machinery installed. 

Specialties: Lead, Silver, Copper, Gold. 
Rare Metals Wanted. 

Bannockburn. Ont, 

Rutherford, New Jersey. 

No. 1418 Flatiron Building, N.Y. City. 



J. B. TYRRELL 

Late of the Geological Survey of Canada. 

MINING ENGINEER 

Dawson ------ Yukon. 

Telegraphic Address — Tyrrell, Dawson. 
Code used — Bedford McNeil's. 

F. HILLE 

MINING ENGINEER 



Mines and Mineral Lands examined and 
reported on. Plans and Estimates on 
Concentrating Mills after the Krupp- 
Bilharz system. 



PORT ARTHUR, ONT. 
Canada. 



L. VOGELSTEIN & CO. 

90-96 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 
representing 
ARON HIRSCH & SOHN 
Halberstadt, Germany. 



Copper, Argentiferous and Auriferous Copper 
Ores, Mattes and Bullion, Lead, Tin, Antimony 
Spelter. 

Copper an 1 Brass Rolling and Tubing Mills 
in Europe. 

AGENTS OF THE 

Delamar Copper Refining Works, 
Carteret, N.J. 



HANBURY A. BUDDEN 

ADVOCATE PATENT AGENT 

NEW YORK LIFE BUILDING, MONTREAL 
cable address : brevet, Montreal 



A. W. ROBINSON, M. Am. Soc. C.E., M. Am. Soc. M.E. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEER 



Dredging Machinery 



Plant for Public Works. 
14 PHILLIPS SQUARE, MONTREAL, 
CANADA. 



Gold Dredges. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XV 




CHEAPEST 

POWER. 

60 % Saving 

in Fuel. 

Suction Gas 
Producers 
FOR Gas 
Engines. 

1 lb. of Coal per h.p. hour. Cost J to J cent per horse-power 
hour. Built for any capacity required. No boUer or Gas 
Holder required. Automatic Work. Contracts undertaken for 
complete Power Plants and results guaranteed. 

DR. OSCAR NAGLE, CHEMICAL ENGINEER 

90-96 Wall Street, NEW YORK CITY. 

HENRY BATH & SON, Brokers. 



LONDON, LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA 

METALS, MATTES, ETC. 



All description 
of 

Warehouses. LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA. 
Warrants issued under their Special Act of Parliament. 



NITRATE OF SODA s.'/»'^W'\r.%'oH 



OLDEST EXPERTS IN 

Molybdenite, 
Scheelite, 
^- X Wolframite, 

\ Chrome Ore, 
A 'tp* Nickel Ore, 

^ >,V>X Cobalt Ore, 

Cerium, and - 




Dr. Goldschmidt's 



Talc, 

Mica, 
Barytes, 
Graphite, 
Blende, 
Corundum, 
Fluorspar, 
Feldspar. 



all Ores 
and 
Minerals. 



LARGEST BUYERS, 
BEST FIGURES, 
ADVANCES ON SHIPMENTS, 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED, 



Cables— Blackwell. Liverpool, ABC 
Code, Moreingr & Neal, Mining and 
General Code, Lieber's Code and Mul- 
ler's Code. 



ESTABLISHED BY GEO. G. BLACKWELL, 1869. 



ALUMINO- 
THERMICS 

' THERMIT" Stee! for Repair Work, Welding of 
Street Rails, Shafting and Machinery. 

"TITAN THERMIT" for foundry work. 

"NOVO" AIR HARDENING STEEL 

Twist Drills, Milling Cutters, Blanks. 

High Speed and Durability. 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Sole Agent for Canada, 
334 St. James Street, Montreal. 



THIS SPACE TO LET 



MAJOR DAVID BEAMES, 

Late I.S.C., and of Berl^t]ampstead, England. 

If the above will communicate with C. J. Walker's 
Advertising Agency, 24 Coleman Street, London, 
England, he may hear of something to his advantage. 



LEDOUX 8c CO. 



99 JOHN STREET 
NEW YORK 
SAMPLE AND ASSAV ORES AND METALS 

Independent Ore Sampling Works at the Port of New York. Only two 
such on the Atlantic seaboard. 

We are not Dealers or Refiners, but receive Consignments, Weigh, Sample 
and Assay them, selling to the highest bidders, obtaining adyances when 
desired, and the buyers of two continents pay the highest market price, in 
New York Funds, cash against our certificates. 

Mines Examined and Sampled. Also Analyse everything. 

THE COBALT SILVER DISTRICT 

LANDS, MINES AND 
STOCK FOR SALE 

The Coleman Development Co., Ltd. 

(No Personal Liability) Haileybury, P.O. 



NICKEL 

THK CANADIAN COPPKR COMPANY. 

NICKEL FOR NICKEL STEEL 

THE ORFORE) COPPER COMPANY. 



WRITE US FOR PARTICULARS AND PRICES 

General Offices: 43 Exchangee Place, NEW YORK. 



XVI 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



^L/CE pfAMWAY 




Upper Terminal, Alice Tramway. 



Patent Automatic Aerial Tramway 

(RIBLET SYSTEM) 

With this system 

one: man can handle 1300 TONS 

per day. 

COST OF OPERATION : ONE MAN'S WAGES. 
More Riblet Tramways built last year than all others combined. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES AND SPECIFICATIONS. 

RIBLET TRAMWAY CO. 

SPOKANE, WASH., U S.A. NELSON, B.C., CANADA 



H 



BENNETT FUSE 



CROWN 




BRAND 



Manufactured by 



WILLIAM BENNETT, SONS & CO. 

Camborne, Cornwall, 
England 



CANADIAN OFFICE: 

BENNETT FUSE CO., YATES ST., 

VICTORIA, B.C. 



AND AGENCIES 
THROUGHOUT 
THE DOMINION 




CORRUC/\TED 

METALLIC 

P/\CKINC 

for joints of any 
Size or Shape 

Newton & 
Nicholson 

TVNE DOCK 

CORRUGATED 

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WORKS; 

South 
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Telegraqhic 
Address : 

"CORRUGATE," 
Tyne Dock. 




rORTY-SIXT.i YEAR. 
56 PAGES : WEEKLY : ILLUSTRATED. 



INDISPENSABLE TO MINING MEN 

t3 PER YEAR POSTPAID, 

SEND I'UU SAMPI.E COPT. 



Mining and Scientific Press 

330 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAt- 



Announcement 

H For the greater convenience of our patrons in Ontario and Manitoba we 
have opened a Sales Office at 12 T.awlor Building, Corner King and Yonge 
Streets, Toronto, Mr. W. G. Chater, Representative. 

1! Correspondents in Ontario and Manitoba are requested to address them- 
selves there and are cordially invited to call when in Toronto. 

The Jenckes Machine Co., Limited. 



TORONTO 
HALIFAX 



HEAD OFFICE: SHERBROOKE, QUE. 
vunpkc- SHERBROOKE, QUE. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



ROSSLAND 
VANCOUVER 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xvii 



HOISTING ENGINES 
FOR DEEP MINES 




Sullivan Corliss Geait'd Hoist, built for a 
Chihuahua, Mexico Company. Hoists of this 
type are built in any desired capacity and for 
any speed. 




Sullivan Hoists are furnished for any 
requirements of speed, depth and load, 
and to meet any conditions of mining 
service. 

They are the result of our experience 
of 25 years in design and manufacture, 
and embody numerous features original 
with this company, which render them 
superior to other makes. 



These hoists are provided with 
the Sullivan automatic interlock- 
ing throttle closing device and 
brake control, thus absolutely 
preventing an overwind. 

Catalogue 42. 



SPECIFICATIONS ON REQUEST 



Sullivan Corliss direct acting Hoist, built for the 
Centennial Copper Co., Calumet, Mich.« Engines, 36 x 
60 inches. Drum 15 ft. diameter, by 15 ft. long. Horse- 
power, 2,500, Speed. 4,000 ft. per minute from 5,000 
ft. depth. 



Air Compressors 
Rook Drills 
Diamond Drills 



Sullivan Machinery Co. 



CLAREMONT, 
NEW YORK 
PITTSBURG; 
KNOXVILLE 



N.H. 



ST. LOUISj 
JOPLIN, MO. 
DENVER 
BUTTE 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



EL PASO 
SALT LAKE 
PARIS, FR ANCE 
JOHANNESBURG 



SPOKANE 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ROSSlAND 

MEXICO 



xvui 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




Jeffrey 17a Electric Chain Coal Mining Machine, half under cut. 



THE "JEFFREY " 
CUTS THE WORLD'S COAL 

MINING BULLETINS Nos 10 & 11 
MAILED FREE=== 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 

The Jeffrey Manufacturing Company 

COLUMBUS, OHIO, U.S.A. ^ 

NEW YORK , CHICAGO PITTSBURGH DENVER KNOXVILLE, Tenn. CHARLSTON, W. V.. 



CAINIADIArSJ AGENTS: 
A. R. Williams Machinery Co., TORONTO. Williams & Wilson, MONTREAL 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xix 



A FINE STEAM PLANT 




"I will say without qualification that it is as fine a boiler and 
engine plant as I have ever had the pleasure of seeing for its 
size. The engine was working without heating, and absolutely 
without an}' noise. I .wish to congratulate you on your success 
in building this class of engine, and hope that we may have 
pleasure in dealing with you again." 

The above' refers to a 350 horse power Robb-Armstrong Corliss 
Engine and two 175 horse power Robb-Mumford Boilers in- 
stalled by us. 



ROBB ENGINEERING GO, Ltd., amherst, n.s, 

AGENTS 

WlIiLIAM McKAY, 320 Os!^iiis:toii ATeniie, Toronto. 

WAT^OX JACK dc COMPAj^Y, Bell Telephone JBuildiiig, Montreal. 

J. F. POKTGK, 355 Carlton Street, Winnipeg. 



XX 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




Complete 



Ai 



1 r 



Installations 



MPERIAL" PLUG DRILLER 



The Canadian Rand Drill Co. 



Sovereign Bank Building j!^ 7C Montreal, Que, 



Rand Rock Drills and Drill Mountings 

FOR MINE, TUNNEL AND QUARRY WORK 




STRAIGHT LINE 

STEAM DRIVEN CLASS "C" 
* 

AIR COMPRESSOR 



Ask for 
Catalogues 




Rand Little Giant Drill. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XXI 



ALLIS-CHALMERS-BULLOCK 



LI M ITEID 




GATES "K" ROGK AND ORE BREAKER 

W-J? reduce rock for finer crushing or pulverizing by stamps, rolls or Huntington mills; for fluxing purposes in smelting plants- 
for radway ballast and the production of cement and concrete the Gates "K" Gyratory Breaker is unequalled It is the onlv' 
machme bu.lt so as to be driven at right angles to the discharge opening, as here shown. This permits of ^verv compact arranS 
Si^e^^'^sicTt'aiogrrio* ''''''''''' ^"'"'^ Hoes^away with%xpTn:h7traLi^^^^^^^^^ 



ELECTRIC AND MINING PLANTS 



WORKS 

Iranch Offices : : 



MONTREAL. 

Halifax, Toronto, Winnipeg, Nelson, Vancouver. 



xxii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



A GRAND JOURNAL.' 

'An interesting fact in connection with The Mining Jouhnal is that 
with the year 1905 it enters upon the third score and ten years of its exist- 
ence, having been established in the year 1835. While three score years 
and ten may be the span of life allotted to man — his period of usefulness 
drawing at that age to a close — it is not so with The Mining Journal. Time 
has written no wrinkle upon its brow: stronger, brighter, better than 
ever, and of great good to mining men all over the world.' — Los Angeles 
Mining Review. 

Z\jc fUMning Journal, 

RAILWAY AND COMMERCIAL GAZETTE. 

The Oldest Mining Paper and the Pioneer of the Tech- 
nical and Trade Press of the World. 

Circulates all over the World amongst Miners, Metallurgists, 
Engineers, Manufacturers, Capitalists, and Investors. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY, PRICE 6d. 

Subscriptions — Inland, £1. 4s. per annunn. Abroad, £1. 8s. 
per annum, payable in advance. 

THE IVIINING JOURNAL advocates the interests of the Min- 
ing and Metallurgical Industries at home and abroad, and has a 
unique reputation for its Special Correspondence from all the 
Mining Districts of the World, and also for its Prices Current of 
Metals, which are bought and sold in all parts of the Globe upon 
the basis of the 'next published Mining Journal prices.' 

THE MINING JOURNAL was established more than seventy 
years ago, and still maintains its position as the leading organ 
of the World's Press devoted to Mining and its allied interests. 

THE MINING JOURNAL'S advertising pages form a com- 
plete Buyer's Directpry. 

THE MINING JOURNAL is neither controlled, nor is any 
interest in it held or exercised by any Mine-owner, Speculator, 
or Syndicate, nor is it in any way whatever connected with any 
Stock or Share Dealing Agency. 

THE IVIINING JOURNAL 



46 Queen Victoria Street, E.C., 



LONDON, England. 



Assayers' Supplies 

CHEMICAL 



APPARATUS 

Fioe Cliemicals 
Heavj Clieniicals 




Prospectors' Outfits 
Miners' Outfits 



Correspondence invited. Prompt Deliveries. 

The Chemist & Surgeons 
Supply Co. Ltd. 




32 McGill College Avenue, 
MOWTREAL. 



CHEMICAL AND 
ASSAY APPARATUS 

ZINC, CYANIDE and SULPHURIC 
ACID for CYANIDE PROCESS 

Complete Assay Outfits 

The Hamilton-Merrit Prospector's Outfits 
Becker's Balances and Weights Battersea Crucibles and Muff 
Hoskins' Gasoline Furnaces Kavalier's Bohemian Glassware 

IWunktell's Swedish Filters 

LYMAN, SONS & COMPANY 

Our Catalogue on Application 
380. 382. 384 & 386 ST. PAUL STREET, MONTREAL. 





Steel Wire Perforated Steel. 
Write for Special Catalogue. 



For Miners and every other use. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited 



HAMILTON, Ont. 



MONTREAL, Que. 




STEAM 

BOILERS 

Horizontal, Upright, Portable, Loco- 
motive, Return Tube, Tubular, 
Smoke Stacks, Stand Pipes, Water 
Towers, Rivetted Steel Plate work 
of every description. 



CANADA FOUNDRV COMPANY, LIMITEID. 

Head Office and Works : District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, 

TORONTO, Ont. Winnipeg, Vancouver, Rossland, Calgary. 



24th YEAR OF PUBLICATION 




THE OLDEST AND ONLY OFFICIAL MINING JOURNAL PUBLISHED IN CANADA, 



Edited by H. MORTIMER-LAMB. 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 



( Editorial Office: 171 St. James St., MONTREAL. 
I Office of Publication : 250 Wellington St , OTTAWA . 



VOL. XXVI— No. 3. 



MONTREAL, MARCH, 1906. 



$2.00 per year 
20 cents per copy 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Published by THE REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
Limited, P.O. Box 2187, Montreal, Canada. 

Address all communications as above. 

Subscription, payable in advance, $3.00 per year, including 
postage. 

The REVIEW'S columns are always open for the discussion 
of questions cognate to the mining industry. 

Advertising copy must reach the REVIEW OFFICE not 
later than the 2Stb of the month preceding publication 
to secure insertion in next issue. 

Advertising rates on application. 



CONTENTS. 

Page. 

Editorial Comment 71 

Editorials: — 

Resources of Northern Quebec 73 

The Kakabeka Electric Power Co 75 

The Butte Copper Fight 75 

John Stanton 75 

Papers: — 

Smelting of Magnetic Iron Ore by Electricity 76 

The Hunter V. Mine ' 77 

The Nature of Ore Deposits 80 

Bequest for Massachusetts Tech 82 

The Zinc Duty 82 

The Cassiar Coal Fields 82 

The World's Petroleum Supply 83 

Water as a Diamond Catcher 84 

Reporfe<3f Dominion Coal Co 85 

The Stationary Engineers of Ontario . 87 

A Novel Water Hoist 89 

Gigantic Testing Machine . '. 9I 

A Close View of the Walking Delegate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 

Electric Mine Locomotives 

Amendment of Yukon Laws 94 

Coal Notes 94 

Company Meetings & Reports 95 

Mining Intelligence 95 

Mining Notes 97 

Mining Men and Affairs '. . . . . . 98 

Mining Incorporations 1 99 

Industrial Notes 99 

Report on Patents 99 

The Review's editor, Mr. H. Mortimer Lamb, has 
been ill with typhoid fever, from which he is now re- 
covering. Our readers are therefore requested to 
overlook any shortcomings in this present issue, 
which has been without the valuable advice and over- 
sight of Mr. Lamb. 



The official stamp of a town has been given to Cobalt 
by the establishment there of one of the brightest 
weekly papers we have knowledge of. The new paper 
is a weekly of eight pages, of which two are devoted 
to matters in and about Cobalt and Coleman Town- 
ship. The editor has a trenchant pen and a sound 
knowledge of good citizenship; under such a helmsman 
the Free Press should make port on every voyage. 
The Review extends its greetings and best wishes 
to the new-comer. 



"The Silver Leaf Mining Company's property has 
changed hands, having been bought by an American 
Company. The purchase price was $210,000. There 
was about $4000 expended on this property in pros- 
pecting and development. For an expenditure of four 
thousand dollars, the former company clears the hand- 
some profit of $206,000. Big interest on that invest- 
ment. The property is situated near Kerr Lake." 
The above from the Cobalt Free Press. The property 
alluded to is under an agreement to sell, but the $210,000 
must be obtained from the pockets of the people. 
This is the property stocked by Douglas Lacey & Co. 
for the modest sum of $5,000,000. 

The specific allotment of shares in the new organ- 
ization known as the Canadian Consolidated Mines 
Limited, is reported as follows: — 
For the entii'e assets of the St. Eugene 

Consohdated Mining Co., Ltd $2,333,300.00 

For the Centre Star and War Eagle 

combined 1,555,500.00 

For the Trail Smelter 750,000.00 

For the Rossland Power Company. . . . 6o!oOO.OO 

making a total of $4,698,800 . 00 

out of $5,500,000.00 total capital. The balance of 
the capital stock, namely: $801,200.00, will be retained 
in the treasury for the purpose of meeting such new 
expenses as may have to be charged against capital, 
and not against earnings. 

A recent interview with Mr. J. B. Tyrrell, formerly 
of the Canadian Geological Survey and recently of 
Dawson, has been printed, in which Mr. Tyrrell finds 
considerable fault with the high transportation charges 
mada by the White Pass Railway. Mr. Tyrrell enter- 
tains the idea that the Dominion Government should 



72 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



make an exploration of tlie country lying between the 
heart of the Yukon and some point on the Grand 
Trunk Pacific line in British Columbia. Ho is also of 
the opinion that the country through which this 
thousand miles of railroad will have to go is as pro- 
mising as the region in New Ontario through which 
the Temiskaming road runs, and therefore that it 
would be a good investment on the part of the Do- 
minion Government to make the preparatory explora- 
tions. Mr. Tyrrell is authority for the statement that 
some prices have gone down very considerably in Daw- 
son City, but the funny part is that one pays as much 
for a newspaper as he does for a glass of whiskey. 

The Free Press, published at Cobalt is looking after 
the interests of that town in many ways. Apropos of 
the beautiful chaos of lanes and alley ways which that 
town presents it comments as lollows: — 

"Would it be possible for the Railway Commissioners 
to break through their wilderness of mal-administra- 
tion, and look after the building sites in Coljalt. Build- 
ings are going up in all directions, principally in the 
west end of the town, and people who have nothing 
else to go by, but their own convenience, are building 
on the street and off it ; and later on there will be end- 
less confusion and litigation. It is to be presumed 
that the Railway Commission is not for ornament 
only, or for posing before Ontario as great financiers. 
Somebody should stick a join in the Commission and 
see if it is alive." 



We are informed that the Hon. Mr. Prevost, Minister 
of Mines for Quebec, is to personally visit the Chibo- 
gamoo mining district during the early summer, in 
company with the Superintendent of Mines, Mr. 
Obalski, and with a Belgian engineer, to advise the 
Honorable Minister as to the character and value of 
the new mining district. With all respect we venture 
to warn the Honorable Minister against relying too 
closely upon the opinions of qualified engineers who 
are unfamiliar with a country. The metalliferous 
rocks the world over have certain identical character- 
istics, but also they have very diversified forms in 
different regions, and as Canada has as good and 
capable geologists as can be found anywhere in the 
world, it would seem that to ignore these men bv the 
importation of new men may unwittingly give a black 
eye to the new region. 



On the 12th of February an oflScial announcement 
was made of the reduction of rates for freight and 
treatment on silver-lead ores. The charge of $15.00 
a ton, which had been in force since 1900, has now been 
cut to $12.00 a ton. This announcement was first 
made by the Hall Mining & Smelting Company, but 
it is understood that the reduction will hold good at 
the Trail smelter, at the Pilot Bay works, and at the 
Marysville smelter also. 

No reason is given for this reduction, unless it is 
the one which is surmised generally by people well 
acquainted with the condition of ore supplies in British 
Columbia, and that is, that ore is wanted badly by 
the smelters and is not coming out in sufficient quantity 
to keep all the stacks in blast. Among other reasons 
given by the local press are: the adoption at the Hall 
smelter of labour-saving devices and increased economy 
in handling the ore and the adoption of the Hunting- 
don-Heberlein process which effects a reduction of 
the cost of roasting. To our mind the reduction of 
the treatment rate will probably have the effect of 
increasing ore supplies from the Slocan district, in 
which many deposits of comi)aratively low grade ore 



have not been worked for some years because the 
margin of profit was too small to permit of successful 
operation. The increased margin of $3.00 may allow 
certain of these properties to resume operations. 

In connection with papers and discussions which 
were held at this month's meeting of the Canadian 
Mining Institute on the topic of a Federal Department 
of Mines and the work of the Geological Survey, it is 
apropos to mention that Mr. Chas. D. Walcott, Di- 
rector of the United States Geological Survey has 
issued an order to all members of his Survey Staff 
which we reproduce below. 

The occasion for this order arose from an attempt 
made recently by some members of the U. S. G. S. to 
control a mining paper in Chicago and to make use of 
the members of that Department of the Government. 
The affair was short-lived, and the" instructions issued 
by Director Walcott were sensible and appropriate, 
except for the half a dozen publications which may 
be classed as "pure science" journals. On this point 
several of our esteemed contemporaries hold diverge^n 
views. 



The following is the order sent by the Director to 
the members of the United States Geological Survey : 

"Since the organization of the Geological Survey it 
has been the policy of the Director not onh^ to jper- 
mit, but to encourage its members to publish in tech- 
nical and scientific journals and in the transactions 
of societies technical and scientific articles, provided 
they do not anticipate the official publication of the 
results of specific investigations, of which the priority 
of publication rests with the Geological Survey. It 
has always been believed that the widest dissemina- 
tion possible should be given by this means to infor- 
mation in the possession of the Surve}', particularly 
where the material to be published consists of infor- 
mation gained or conclusions reached as a result of 
general reading or observation, and i^ not the out- 
come of specific official investigations. Even if the 
writers receive compensation for such articles there 
does not appear to be anything objectionable in the 
practice, provided the writing is done outside of 
official hours. 

When such articles are based on information that 
has been obtained in specific investigations, but (a) is 
contained in official reports already published or in 
press, or (b) is not considered appropriate for incor- 
poration in an official report, permission to publish 
should be obtained from the Director, and the fact 
should be stated in the article. 

There does, however, appear to be some question 
in respect to the propriety of Survey officials being 
identified as editors or special contributors, or in 
any other intimate way, with technical or trade 
papers conducted as business enterprises. Such 
connection is apt to be used for advertising pur- 
poses and is calculated to bring criticism on the 
Survey organization. It is deemed best, therefore, 
while not abridging any of the privileges recognized 
in the preceding paragraphs, to prohibit such con- 
nection of Survey officials with the conduct of trade 
papers. 

This prohibition is not intended to apply to connec- 
tion with journals which are devoted entirely to the 
dissemination of scientific knowledge and which are 
not conducted for profit or as business enterprises. 
Such publications are Science, the National Geographic 
Magazine, the American Chemical Journal, Economic 
Geologij, Forestry and Irrigation." 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



73 



That the district of Cobalt is to undergo the usual 
speculative phase, and the agony of joint stock com- 
panies founded on little or nothing but capitalized at 
seven figures, is now beyond doubt. The sale of the 
Silver Leaf property at the foot of Kerr Lake and its 
incorporation by the New York firm of Douglas, Lacey 
& Co., who for years have been known as the largest 
organizers of stock companies from which no returns 
have come to shareholders, is the first movement, and 
one which we fear will be but too common during the 
present year. The district, and the towns in it, are all 
preparing for this influx of stock jobbers and promo- 
ters, and undoubtedly the Toronto Stock Market will 
have a plentiful list of Cobalt Mines, with whose shares 
the general public wUl be invited to'play the game of 
"buying and selling". We had hoped that mining in 
the Cobalt district, which has hitherto been conducted 
on a legitimate basis, was going to be free from the 
stock boom phase, but its richness and its newspaper 
fame has been too great to preserve it from a stock 
boom. We can only hope that the experience of the 
Canadian public with the Rossland and British Colum- 
bia fizzle of less than 10 years ago will keep them 
from seconding the efforts of the promoters to any 
extent. 



In connection with this matter we reproduce for the 
benefit of our readers a choice editorial from that 
sturdy and independent sheet the Free Press of Co- 
balt. We congratulate our contemporary upon its 
attitude and wish " More power to its elbow. " 

"Wild cat" schemes do not come to Cobalt to 
operate. It is not healthy for them hre, but they use 
the name of Cobalt to give their schemes a gilt edge 
standing. Nearly everybody has heard that Cobalt 
is the richest mining district in the world, and the 
"wUd cat" schemes are using the fame of the district 
to operate. 

It looks such a simple matter to part the credulous 
and theif money. People who do not know much 
about mining, think that anything that is advertised 
as a claim in the Cobalt district is a safe investment 
and 'plunge'. A concern we believe is now operating 
in Michigan, on the strength of Cobalt's fame and 
selling one dollar shares for $45. The lot on which the 
stock is issued has been staked but nothing more. It 
is questionable if it has been passed by the inspector, 
but people are rushing in to get rich quick. "A fool 
and his money is easily parted" is an old saying that 
holds good in mining as in anything else. 

Did the investor notice that none of these "wUd 
cats" have an office in Cobalt? If their schemes were 
good for the investor, Cobalt would be the place for a 
head office, but that would not do, for the people here 
might expose it in defence of the reputation of the 
town. 

Oh no! These fellows keep away from Cobalt but 
use the name of the town to dupe the unwary. It is 
so easy to fool some people. A lot on which there is 
nothing but building stone is advertised as a rich mine, 
and in order to show its wealth an assayer's certificate 
is published showing the assey in ounces to the ton. 
Now how is this managed? The assayer is a profes- 
sional man. A specimen or sample is brought to 
him for an assay. He assays the samples, and gives a 
certificate as to its worth, and there his duty ends. 
He does not say in his certificate that he has taken the 
sample from the mine. He simply says he found so 
and so in the sample furnished, and how easy it is to 
get a sample. All the rich mines have plenty of ore on 
the dump and it is so easy to "swipe" a piece, and the 



assayers certificate does the rest. Then out comes a 
glittering prospector of the "immense wealth" of the 
quarry, published far and near and then the fakir site 
down and the money comes in. 

The Free Press has been offered two of these ad- 
vertisements but rejected them. The Free Press 
won't be made the agency for "doing" the people out 
of their money. We believe in honest dealing, and 
its not honest to dupe the credulous. 

If any oily share shovers come at one of our readers, 
just tell him to wait. Then acquaint us with the 
location of the "immensely wealthy lot" and we'll 
do the rest. 

If the scheme is a humbug, we'll tell it to you in 
capital letters and save you your coin. Don't you 
think it is perfectly absurd that any man would give 
you a dollar for twentj'-five cents ? Stop and think, 
and that's what the share shover tells you so glibly. 
Our advice to you is, don't be "a sucker". Dividend 
paying shares are not peddled around. They are ^ 
kept for the family circle where the public are not 
invited. Don't be a "sucker". 

With the quarterly dividend of $15.00 per share, 
payable on the 23rd of this month, the total amount 
paid to shareholdei;s of the Calumet and Hecla Copper 
Mine will aggregate the enormous sum of $93,850,000. 
Beginning as a dividend payer in 1868, for 38 consecu- 
tive years the property has regularly paid a dividend 
averaging nearly 2^ millions of dollars a year on a 
total capital of $2,500,000 which capital represents 
an investment of $1,200,000 originally. 

The Company easily stands at the head of the 
world's mining enterprises, no other mine has such a 
record either as to dividends or as to percentage 
upon original investment. 



RESOURCES OF NORTHERN QUEBEC. 



Our readers may remember that, in August we 
printed information concerning the resources of 
Northern Quebec which were then just beginning to 
attract the attention of capitalists and of mining men. 
Since midsummer the interest taken in the extensive 
area of mineral-bearing rocks in that section has been 
very great. Something over 230 square miles of the 
country bordering the northern and western shores 
of Lake Chibogamoo, surrounding Lake Wahkonichi, 
and including the communicating water ways, has 
been applied for under the existing mining laws of 
Quebec, and the Provincial Treasurer has received 
the money therefor. Transportation in this northern 
section has been helped and assisted by the Provincial 
Government to the extent of a grant of $10,000.00, 
for the purpose of opening a winter road into the dis- 
trict from the village of St. Felicien, and this road is 
being utilized at the present time by something over 
100 men, sent in with supplies by half a dozen com- 
panies, for the purpose of prospecting their holdings 
for minerals during the coming summer. 

The chief and parent organization of the whole is 
"The Chibogamoo Gold and Asbestos Mining Com- 
pany, Ltd.," which was (as has been stated in a previous 
article) the direct outcome of the discoveries made by 
Mr. Peter McKenzie in the fall of 1903. From 
a modest beginning this corporation has become, at 
least on paper, a gigantic concern with a capital of 
$6,000,000.00; a very large amount of which is in cash, 
which has been put in by New York gentlemen in- 
terested, and believing, in the possibilities of the 
country. The difficulty of transporting men and 



74 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



supp bes into that country, and of bringing out ore or 
metallic products, from that section was clearfy 
pointed out m the articles printed by the Review 
last summer. 

In full knowledge of these difficulties, applications 
have been made to the Provincial Government, at 
Its present session of Parliament, for railway charters 
not only into this particular Chibogamoo district 
but into that wide band of Huronian rocks which runs 
m a general easterly and westerly direction across 
T.l L^ke Chibogamoo to 

Lake Abitibi. What the possibilities of this large 
area of ancient and altered rocks are, in the way of 
valuable minerals, is entirely an unknown quantity 
as yet, with the exception of the eastern portion round 
Chibogamoo Lake. There, it has been well established 
that the greenstones are penetrated and altered bv 
eruptives m many places, which eruptives seem, as 
m the Cobalt district, to have been the main cause 
ot metallic precipitations in the rocks. The crgolo- 
gical conditions for the existence of important bodies 
of metalliferous minerals seem to be present in most 
favorable form, and work, in the shape of develop- 
nient IS the on y thing needed to demonstrate whether 
this Hinterland of Quebec is not one of the most im- 
portant mineral areas that we have in the Dominion 
In other issues we have commented upon the enerev 
and progressiveness of the present Minister of Mines 
Colonization and Fisheries for the Province of Que- 
bec, the Hon Mr. Jean Prevost, who has endeavoured 
to organize his department upon business lines and 
administer it upon a sound basis. The difficulties 
which have confronted Mr. Prevost, as indeed everv 
other official of the Government, have their ori-in 
in the financial poverty of the province; lack of monev 
necessarily means lack of energetic administration 
which is impossible when financial resources are 
small or crippled It is probablv for this reason that 
all applications for money grants for the projected 
railroads have been unceremoniously turned down 
and the reason has been stated with delicious frank- 
ness and brevity We are informed upon the best 
authority that colonization must precede any request 
for hnancial assistance to railroads in these new 
regions of_ the Province. There is, unfortunately 
m this region north of the Height of Land little ov 
nothing to tempt the colonizer. The district lying 
between Lake Abitibi and Lake Mistassini, in an 
easterly and westerly direction, and between the 
Height of Land and the 50th parallel of north la- 
titude appears from all reports that have been made 
to be good for nothing whatever unless it is a region 
rich in valuable deposits of mineral. The reasons 
for this are apparent; first, in its northern altitude 
where early frosts and severe winters must be the 
rule at all altitudes greater than 400 to 500 feet above 
sea level; and secondly, to the stunted, or compara- 
tively stunted, character of the timber which exists 
on the elevated plateaus. There would, therefore 
seem to be the best of reasons for believing that any 
attempt to colonize this district north of the Height 
of Land, would be an expensive and probable failure- 
and that one must look solely to the development of 
the mining industryjTthere for the creation of popula- 
tion and of small towns which would require the 
cultivation of such amounts of land as might be 
necessary to supply their inhabitants with the neces- 
saries of life. 

History shows us that all attempts to colonize re- 
mote interior sections have been failures unless such 
sections were covered by rich prairie loam The ex- 
perience of British Columbia may l)e taken as one 



example to bear out this statement; for many years 
notwithstanding the mild and salubrious climate 
existing m that province, the rich valleys of British 
Columbia failed to attract settlers, simply for the 
reason that there was no local demand, nor market! 
Z ^n-Z'^'w l ^It^^h^hese settlers might raise from 
the soil. With the discovery of Rossland in 1894 
and the rapid development of South Eastern Koote- 
nay, m the sections round Nelson, Boundary and the 
other main towns, there sprung into existence busy 
mming camps demanding food, and therefore cre- 
ating a hea thy local demand for farm products 
which caused contiguous valleys to rapidly become 
peopled with colonists. Therefore, the ^rapid coC 
za ion HI the interior of British Columbia is undoubt- 
edly due to the equally rapid development of the 
mining mdustry in that province, and one would be 
well justified in saying that the mining industry 
a one will be the basis of colonization in Ihis region 
of Quebec which lies north of the Height of Lind 
The reports of explorations found in the records of 
the Canadian Geological Survey and in the reports 
of the Commissioner of Crown Lands for the province 
of Quebec, indicate that there are large grass areas 
r?o^,^%;5°'^f J^^f Bay between the latitudes of 
oi lo i)^ north, and between longitudes 77° to 79 30° 
west of Greenwich, and that cattle at this low altitude 
could well survive the winter weather, and could be 
well fed on these grass areas, but it is difficult to see 
any market or any future for the settlement of these 
grazing areas, or of any part of the region to the 
north^ unless a population is established between 
the Height of Land and the northern boundary of 
Quebec ; and the only matter which can bring such 
a population permanently into such a country would 
be^ the finding and development of profitable mine- 
Therefore, if the liberty may be taken, the Ren'Iew 
would suggest that the problem before the Quebec 
Cabinet IS not, at present, one of colonization, but 
one of how best to encourage the discovery and deve- 
lopment of minerals in this Huronian Belt which runs 
throughout the whole of the province north of the 
Height of Land, and which has been proved to be 
f^"" "^i^erals in that eastern section 
which borders the shores of Lake Chibogamoo 

I he existence of asbestos, in large quantities and of 
a quality fully equal to the best that is in the market 
of very large veins or bodies of copper-bearing and 
go d-bearing quartz; of reported veins of argentiferous 
galena; of disseminated magnetites and chromites, 
all indicate clearly that the eastern end of this belt 
of greenstones contains mineral of merchantable 
value in large quantities, and one is justified in assu- 
ming that the extension of this Huronian area west- 
erly will likewise contain valuable mineral deposits. 
This belief is further substantiated bv the periodic 
reports which have been brought to the Trans-Con- 
tinental Railway Commission by the engineers who 
have been surveying trial lines and endeavouring to 
get a location line through this section of Quebec 
Should valuable minerals be found, it will be a rich 
man s country, similar to British Columbia, and not 
a poor mans country; for vast expenditures will be 
required, not alone to mine the ores but to reduce 
them or treat them, and therefore investment of 
many millions of dollars will be required for the deve- 
lopment of tlie country. How to attract this capital 
and secure the amount of money needed are questions 
that must be met by the Provincial Government 
which cannot afford to solve them in any but a wise 
manner. Here again experience may be taken from 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



75 



the history of British Columbia; concessions made 
to capitahsts of unquestioned experience and un- 
doubted financial strength have been proved wise 
and have full justification. Quebec, in all probabil- 
ity, has great resources in this northern country, 
but with her sister province, Ontario, occupying the 
public gaze with the extensive and rich discoveries of 
silver-cobalt -nickel ores in Temiskaming, and with 
Mexico offering a wide and comparativelv cheap field 
for mining investment, having also 300 working days 
in the year with low wages for labourers, Quebec 
certainly has no points of advantage, but is rather 
at a disadvantage, and all such disadvantages and 
difficulties should be taken into consideration, and 
judicious concessions granted by a government which 
has the interests of the province at heart. Undoubt- 
edly, on this line, the framing of a new mining law 
would be advantageous. Under the existing law 
there are many sections justly needing criticism. 
The tying-up of large areas under prospecting licenses 
and the permissive renewal of these licenses without 
bona-fide expenditure of labour and capital, is a point 
frequently criticized by mining men. The tving-up 
of large areas without the expenditure of money upon 
the same is a draw-back to any country, and we have 
no doubt that the present Minister of Mines fullv 
realizes this, and will change the same at the earliest 
possible moment. With a modern, reasonable and 
dehmte mining law, with adequate protection and en- 
couragement to capital, and the utUization of men 
experienced in Canada rather than the employment 
of nien who have no knowledge of the conditions 
which exist m Northern Canada, there are substan- 
tial reasons for predicting a splendid future for the 
mineral development of Quebec in this northern Sec- 
tion. 



THE BUTTE COPPER FIGHT. 

That the long contested litigation between the Amal- 
gamated Copper Co. and the Heinzes has been brought 
to a close seems to be evident from the various news 
reports which have been current during February 
but no details have been allowed to leak out to the 
public It would appear from Press reports that 
some large financial interests, in nowise interested in 
either the Amalgamated or Heinze properties have 
been approached for their assistance and have been 
consulted in the matter. These strong interests are 
reported to have counselled an amicable amalgama- 
tion or adjustment of difficulties in the interests of 
the general business situation of the country. Report 
has It that the Guggenheims are financially interested 
in the present negotiations. 

In the meantime a corporation has been organ- 
ized in New Jersey under the name of the Butte 
Coalition Mining Co., which will take over the Heinze 
properties with a capital of $15,000,000, the shares 
having a par value of $15.00 each. This capitaliza- 
tion^ and the first board of directors will be temporary 

The main interest to the general public lies in two 
tacts, that peace will now replace a bitter business 
and personal warfare, and that the copper monopoly 
ot the United States is now an assured fact 



JOHN STANTON. 



THE^KAKABEKA ELECTRIC POWER CO. 



The work of developing the water power of Kaka- 
beka Falls near 'Fort William has been practically 
realized and by June of this year power for all the 
industries at Fort William will be available from 
this source. The work has been in charge of Mr R 
W. Leonard as civil engineer, with whom has been 
associated Mr R. S. Kelsch as electrical engineer and 
Mr William Kennedy Jr. as hydraulic engineer 

inr. -^^^^^^ "^^^ taken through a pipe 

10 ft. m diameter to a point about three quarters of a 
mile above the falls where a large reservoir has been 
constructed to act as a fore-bay, from which runs 
the steel penstock which carries the water to the power 
house which lies 180 ft. vertically below the fore-bay. 
itie whole of the work has been carried out with a 
view to dispensing with an'^hor ice, and the principal 
materials of construction have been cement and 
steel. 

, . The initial installation will be 10,000 horse power 
which will be increased as needed from time to time 
Ihe waters of Shebandowan and Dog Lakes are to be 
conserved by dams so as to afford an abundant sup- 
ply of water for all the power likely to be required 
m the future. The total cost of the work is put in 
the neighborhood of $2,000,000, and the voltage 
tTom the power house to the sub-station will be 25 000 
10 provide against accidents the transmission line 
IS m duplicate. It is the intention to supply power 
to all users of five H.P. or over, and the rate to be 
charged will not exceed $25.00 per horse power per 
annum. ^ 



T,h^^,^®ath of John Stanton, which occurred in New 
i ork City on the morning of Friday the 23rd of Febv 
removes one of the most notable men in the history 
of the Copper Industry of North America. Mr 
tetantons death was due to heart failure. He was 
born in Bristol, England on the 25th. of Feby in 1830 
and was the son of John Stanton, a Civil and Mining 
Engineer who came to America in 1835. Mr. Stanton 
senior bought coal lands in the neighborhood of Potts- 
ville, Penn. and instructed his son in the profession of 
mining engineering to such good effect that at the age 
ot 17 he was put m charge of some iron mining opera- 
tions in New Jersey. Subsequently, in 1850, he became 
interested in some mmor copper deposits in Connec- 

^S^TilVn^S^^^^ '''''' 

\u^T^^f^^ obtained valuable deposits in the 
neighborhood of Ducktown which he worked until the 
mines were confiscated by the federal government 
during the civil war. After the war Mr. Stanton be- 
came interested m the copper deposits of Lake Supe- 
rior where he developed several valuable mines and 
made a permanent name in connection with the At- 

oul^P ''''^ ^^^^ its profits 

obtamed from rock carrying the least copper of any 
copper mine which has been worked successfull/ 
For years Mr. Stanton was the treasurer of this pr^ 
perty and it was due to his unusual ability, in both a 
managing and a business way, that the Atlantic Mhie 
has been rightly considered a model of economy 
ability, and an all-round honestv and fairness His 
work at the AUanHc as also at the TFoZ.eV^ e where 
his courage and personal loans rescued the property 

bein/in"n°""''."' '".^ the position o^f 

being, m proportion to its size, the most profitable 
copper mine in the Lake District, is of itself^a monT 

Mr. Stanton was one of the ablest mining engineers 
of the day; he was one of the founders of the MetS 
Exchange and was its president in 1876 He was 



76 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



also a member of the American Institute of Mining 
engineers and was at one time president of the En- 
gineer's Club. He occupied also the position of 
director on the boards of many corporations, and of 
the Granby Copper Co. of British Columbia. 



SMELTING OF MAGNETIC IRON ORE BY 
ELECTRIC Y. 

(From the Mining and Scientific Press.) 

A preliminary report on the subject of smelting by 
electricity the magnetic iron ores obtained from 
various points on the Pacific beach has been sub- 
mitted by Dr. Day to the Director of the U. 8. Geolo- 
gical Survey. 

After considerable correspondence with the paten- 
tees of various forms of electric furnaces, arrange- 
ments were made with the Wilson Aluminum Company 
of New York for the services of C. E. Wilson, their 
expert in electrical smelting. Mr. Wilson arrived in 
Portland Ore. on October 11, and at the end of one 
week had erected a small but efficient electrical fur- 
nace, and was making steel. He had procured in the 
East 25 carbon electrodes — each 48 inches long and 4 
inches square — such as are ordinarily used in electric 
furnaces. The rest of his equipment was obtained in 
Portland from materials kept in stock or easily made 
at a foundry. 

In building the furnace a course of ordinary Car- 
negie fire bricks was laid upon the ground. Upon 
this single course was laid a cast-iron plate, f inch 
thick, 3 feet long and 3 feet wide. On this was placed 
an oval sheet-iron drum of No. 16 iron 3 feet long by 
3 feet high. The sides of this drum were lined with 
fire bricks to form a crucible 18x18 inches and 24 
inches high. The bottom of the crucible was covered, 
from the cast-iron plate up to the tapping hole, with 
broken carbon electrode. The carbon electrode to 
carry the current was suspended by a pulley above 
this furnace and connected with a balanced axle and 
wheel by which it could be readily raised or lowered. 
The top of the furnace was covered with two double 
plates of riveted wrought iron, between which cold 
water was run. In the center of this water-jacketed 
cover an opening was left sufficient to allow the free 
play up and down of the carbon electrode. This fur- 
nace is referred to as " Small Furnace, " or " Fur- 
nace A. " 

Power for Furnace A. — -Through the co-operation 
of the Portland General Electric Company, a special 
wire, bearing a 2300-volt alternating current, was 
run from the city supply to the smelter. This was 
carried into a series of six transformers and yielded a 
current varying from 50 to 20 volts by 1000 to 2000 
amperes. 

Initial Run of Furnace A. — On the afternoon of 
October 17, a current of 57 volts and 1000 amperes 
was passed through the furnace and the arc estab- 
lished. The furnace was then fed with a mixture of 
magnetite, coke, and lime. This consisted of 200 
pounds of magnetite, obtained from the sand at Ham- 
mond Station, near ^Astoria, Or., at the mouth of the 
Columbia River; 44lpounds of "Fairfax" coke, which 
contained about 25% of ash; and 24 pounds of lime. 
About 50 pounds of this charge was slowly introduced 
into the furnace, and within an hour there was 
tapped from the furnace 70 pounds of steel, which 
contained 8% of iron and 53% of titanic acid. 

On the followingTday the furnace was again heated 
and filled with a mixture similar to that used on the 



first run, except that it contained less lime. Steel 
was successfully cast twice, making, for that day's 
run of two hours, a product of 90 pounds of steel from 
300 pounds of iron ore. This gives the furnace a ca- 
pacity, on a continuous run, of 1440 pounds in 24 hours. 

Composition of Charge. — The iron ore fed to the 
furnace showed the following percentages of mag- 
netic oxide, of titanic acid, manganese, and undeter- 
mined matter: 

analysis of COLUMBIA RIVER CONCENTRATES. 

Fe304 79.06 

Ti02 16.00 

Mn02 2.45 

Silica, moisture and undetermined matter 2 . 49 

It will be noted that the heat was sufficient to keep 
the entire slag in a fluid state whether much or little 
titanic acid was present. It is evident also that no 
titanium went into the iron. Instead of the steel 
usually obtained, the charge of October 20, at shown 
by the analysis of that day, gave what was practically 
pig iron. 

Nature of Slags Obtained from Furnace A. — 
The slags first obtained consisted of fused iron sili- 
cates, fused oxides of iron, and silicate of titanium. 
Later in the experiments these slags grew lighter in 
color and in specific gravity. It became possible also 
to lessen the quantity of slag produced, which was 
unduly large owing to the great quantity of ash in the 
coke. The coke used showed on analysis 41% of ash. 
It is difficult to procure in this locality coke that is 
well adapted to metallurgical needs. 

Furnace B. — Experiments with the small furnace 
having been successful, it was thought desirable to 
build a larger furnace, with thicker walls, in which 
higher temperatures might be obtained and main- 
tained. An iron plate 2 inches thick, 5 feet wide and 
6 feet long was therefore procured and laid upon two 
courses of fire brick, to form the base of a furnace, 
on which was set a wrought-iron cylindrical shell { 
inch thick, 5 feet in diameter and 4 feet high. This 
was lined with fire brick, the bottom having the 
usual lining of one course of carbon electrode bricks 
4 inches in diameter. Two carbons clapped together 
with a water-jacketed head or clamp formed the elec- 
trode for introducing the current. The voltage was 
run up as high as possible — that is from 75 to 90 volts, 
the limit of the current obtainable over the wires. 
In all respects except these mentioned, this second 
furnace is identical with the first. 

Iron ore from Aptos, Bay, of Monterey, California, 
was smelted in this furnace on November 10. This 
iron ore is very fine grained and contains a notable 
percentage of manganese, much of which goes into 
the steel. It is not so rich in titanium as the other 
sands that had been used. From the start this fur- 
nace made a satisfactory run, maintaining easily a 
high temperature and turning out a very smooth 
product. After a few trials the slag became as light 
in color as that from any well regulated blast furnace. 
The later products of steel were much denser than 
those first made, which would seem to indicate that, 
at the higher temperature, the process of reduction 
is complete, even in the short time that elapses be- 
tween the beginning of reduction and the tapping. In 
every case, however, small blow holes were observable 
in the steel. These were due to gases which formed 
wherever grains of magnetite were still entangled in 
the steel in process of reduction. The capacity of 
this furnace with a current of 125 volts, 1200 amperes, 
would be 2000 pounds in 24 hours. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW/', 



77 



RECORD OF DAILY RUNS OF FURNACE A. 



Horse 
Power 


Steel 
Pro- 
duced 
per horse 
Power 
Day 


Magne- 
tic iron 
Ore per 
Pound 

of 
Steel 






Lbs. 


Lbs. 


76 


40 


14.66 


2.86 


76 


40 


14.14 


3.33 


137 


53 


2.01 


4.22 


152 


81 


9.42 


.76 


137 


53 


2.01 


6.52 


137 


53 


9.25 


1.03 


91 


68 


8.08 


2.03 


91 


68 


3.31 


5.32 


123 


32 


23.75 


2.44 


184 


98 


6.83 


3.04 


184 


98 


8.65 


4.00 


184 


98 


14.92 


2.09 



JNO. 
Ol 

xvun 




rlours 


Vr>lt<! 


Am 
peres 












t 

X . . . 




1 i 


^7 


1000 


z . . . 


well. lo. 


9" 


01 


1000 


Q 

O . . 




2 


04 


1800 


4, 


Oct. 20. 


2 


57 


2000 


5' ' 


Oct. 21. 


2 


57 


1800 


6. . 


Oct. 21. 


2 


57 


1800 


7. . . 


Oct. 23. 


8 


57 


1200 


8. . . 


Oct. 25. 


3 


57 


1200 


9. . . 


Oct. 26. 


1 


115 


800 


10. . . 


Oct. 27. 


5 


115 


1200 


11. . . 


Oct. 30. 


3 


115 


1200 


12. . . 


Oct. 31. 


5 


115 


1200 



Mag- 
netite 



Mixture Used 



Lbs 
200 
300 
97 
91 
150 
102 
500 
202 
298 
800 
800 
1200 



Coke 



Lbs. 
44 
60 
19 
21 
74 
27 
100 
40 
60 
154 
152 
175 



Lime 
stone 



Lbs. 
24 
30 
8 
4 
7 
2 
24 
12 
30 
96 
64 
112 



Sand 



Lbs. 



10 
12 
10 



Total 
Weight 
of 

Mixture 



Lbs. 
268 
390 
124 
116 
231 
131 
634 
266 
398 
1056 
1018 
1487 



Metal 
Tapped 

From 
Furnace 



Lbs. 
70 
90 
23 
120 
23 
106 
247 
38 
122 
263 
200 
575 



Slag 
Pro- 
duced 



Lbs. 



Carbon 
Elec- 
trode 
• Con- 
sumed 



200 
125 
88 
115 
105 
410 
150 
120 
318 
400 
280 



Lbs. 
1.80 
2.10 
1.20 
3.50 
2.30 
3.20 
2.80 
3.50 
4.00 
2.00 
1.50 
3.00 



RECORD OF DAILY RUNS ON FURNACE B. 



No. 
of 
Run 


Date 


Hours 
Run 


Volts 


Am- 
peres 


Mix 


ture Used 


Total 
Weight 
of 

Mixture 


Metal 
Tapped 

From 
Furnace 


Slag 
Pro- 
duced 


Carbon 
Elec- 
trode 
Con- 
sumed 


Horse 
Power 


Steel 
Pro- 
duced 
per horse 

Power 

Day 


Magne- 
tic ron 
Ore per 
Pound 

of 
Steel 


Mag- 
netite 


Coke 


Lime 
stone 




1904. 










Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 




Lbs. 




Lbs. 


Lbs. 


1. . . . 


November 


10 


4 


100 


1200 


1000 


200 


160 


1360 


480 


250 


2.00 


160.86 


17.91 


2.08 


2. . . . 


November 


11. . 


7 


75 


1600 


1000 


250 


48 


1298 


175 


312 


3,69 


160.85 


3.69 


a5.71 


3. . . 


November 


14 


9 


80 


2000 


858 


1.54 


18 


1030 


450 


457 


6.00 


214.47 


5.59 


1.91 


4. . . . 


November 


16. . 


8 


80 


2000 


800 


170 


84 


1054 


al025 


500 


8.00 


214.47 


14.34 


b. 78 



a Metal not all tapped. 

b Includes metal not tapped from previous run. 



THE hun: 



NrfER 



V. MINE, BRITISH COLUMBIA.* 



By James Ash worth. 

Aerial Cableivay. — The Hunter V. and Double Stan- 
dard claims, belonging to the British Columbia Stan- 
dard Mining Company, Limited, are located on the 
top of a mountain near Ymir, and may be reached 
either by aerial cableway, horseback or on foot. 

This aerial cableway, being one of the most recently 
erected in British Columbia, may be safely assumed 
to exemplify some of the best points in this mode of 
transportation. The distance between the terminal 
stations of the main cableway is 13,000 feet, and there 
are in addition two supplementary cableways, 1,800 
and 500 feet long respectively. All three are worked 
separately, entirely by gravity, and the speed is regu- 
lated by powerful brakes on the clip-wheels at the 
upper stations. 

On the main cableway, the top or fixed ropes, 
inches in diameter, are in two lengths, the first being 
anchored at the top station (Fig. 1), and tightened 
from time to time as required at a station about mid- 
way (Fig. 2). At this station, the bottom length is 
also anchored, and is tightened, as required, at the 
bottom terminal station (Fig. 3). 

On the Hunter V. cableway, the longest, length 
between the supporting towers is about 1,800 feet, 
and the height above the ground is about 300 feet. 

The haulage rope, | inch in diameter, is an endless 
rope. The buckets, of which there are 30, are placed 
at equidistances apart. When the rope is running 
at the rate of 400 feet per minute, 100 tons of ore can 
be easily transported and delivered into cars on the 
♦Excerpt from the Trans. I. M. E. 



railway, in 10 hours ; and this quantity can be increas- 
ed by adding extra buckets. 

Special cradles are used for carrying men and timber : 
two of these cradles being placed a short distance apart, 
so that the timber, in transit, is supported at both ends, 
and, therefore, rides practically horizontally. 

Every movement in the loading and unloading of 
the buckets, is, as far as possible automatic: thus, 
starting from the bottom station (Fig. 3), the catches 
which fasten the bucket in position when loaded, are 
opened by a fixed disengaging arrangement (Fig. 4), 




Fig. 1. — ^Top Station of the Main Cableway: the Ore-bin 

BEING FILLED BY THE SUPPLEMENTARY CaBLEWAY. 



78 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



and the bucket (say, No. 26) dumps its contents into 
the ore-bui without a stop, and then, passing onwards 
round the return wheel, continues its course back to 
the mine with the bucket in an inverted position. The 
object of running the inverted bucket is to prevent 
water or snow from filhng it whilst in transit. On 
arrival at the top station the bucket strikes an inclined- 
plane arrangement (Fig. 5), which forces the bucket 
into its proper position and allows the catches to close 
on to the hooks, and it is then ready for loading on 
the other side of the clip-wheel. Here a man, by means 
of three levers (Fig. 6), regulates the loading and the 
movements of the main cableway. In the intervals 
of time, between the buckets passing this point, the 
man opens the shoot. A, close at his left hand, and 
fills -the automatic loader, B, shewn below. On the 
arrival of a bucket (say, No. 23), a catch on the hang- 
mg frame of the bucket engages with a bar on the 
loader, B, and takes it in tow, and then the loader 
automatically discharges its contents into the bucket, 
while still in motion. The loader, after traversing 
a certain distance (Fig. 7), disengages from the bucket, 
and IS brought back to its original position, by a coun- 
terbalance-weight, ready for loading from the bin. 




Fig. 2. — Midway Anchor.\ge of the M.\in Cableway. 



The ore-bin is filled by the supplement arv cablewav, 
and the buckets are dumped automatically (Fig. 1)."^ 

The buckets at the top and bottom stations (Figs. 4 
and 5) are run from the cable on to fixed edge-rails, 
which conduct them round the clip-wheel and the 
return-wheel. F^g. 8 shows a line of derricks where 
the line makes a curve over one of the hills and also 
shows an inverted bucket returning to the mine. 
The return-wheel (Fig. 4) is mounted on a movable 
platform, by means of which, and a heavy counter- 
balance-weight, the haulage-rope is kept in tension. 
The flanged wheels (Fig. 5) are made in halves, so 
that the tread of the wheel, which is a separate part, 
and is fixed in position by molten lead, may be removed 
and replaced, without the expense of having an en- 
tirely new wheel. 

This mqde of transportation can be applied for the 
cheap transit of ore and materials over long distances, 
and for heavy outputs. Another aerial tramway^ 
under erection, has a length of 3^ miles, and a capacity 
of 800 tons per 10 hours; and another one 4^ miles 
long, demonstrates that long and continuous lengths 
can be worked by this system, without its being neces- 
sary to place the ropes in one straight line. This 
mode of transportation being simple in its details, the 
movements being as far as possible automatic, and 




Fig. .3. — Bottom Station of the Main Cableway. 



the working power being gravity, it is obvious that 
the cost per ton of material moved is very low. 

When the writer travelled on this cableway. the 
tmie occupied in the transit to the mine, which is at 




Fig. 4. — Interior of the Bottom Station. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



79 




Fig. 5. — Interior of the Top Station. 



an elevation of 5,500 feet above sea-level, was about 
50 minutes. 

Hunter V. Mine.—The Hunter V. group of claims 
includes, within its boundaries, portions of a Pmestone- 
deposit, the extent of which has not vet been fully as- 




FiG. 6. — Lo.\DiNG Side of the Top Station. 



certained. Locally, it forms the upper portion of the 
mountains near the head of Porcupine Creek, in the 
Ymir district. In the company's claims, the deposit 
is in the shape of a tongue, about 2,000 feet wide, and 
several miles in length. It is surrounded on three 
sides by a more or less altered gabbro of later origin, 
and belonging, it is thought to the Carboniferous age. 
The gabbro cuts into the limestone in places, whilst 
in others the limestone appears to be entirely surround- 
ed by igneous rocks, just as if portions had become 
detached from the main mass, and had floated off into 
the molten magma. No fossil remains have been 
discovered so as to establish definitely the age of the 
limestone. 

Where least disturbed, the bedding planes strike 
in an east-and-west direction, and dip slightly to the 
south. In the process of mountain-building, the mass 
has, like many other parts of British Columbia, been 
subjected to great strains, with the result that in 
places it is faulted, folded and contorted into confus. 




FiG. 7. — Loading Side of the Top Station. 



ing shapes, and the original structure is almost entirely 
obscured. Fractures have also been formed, in which 
the circulating waters have re-deposited the lime as 
pure calcite, and these occur in irregular bands through- 
out the mass, varying in thickness up to 6 or 8 feet. 
At some other period, siliceous solutions appear to 
have circulated throughout the formation, and silica 
has been deposited in the free state, as also in combina- 
tion with lime, magnesia, etc. 

The most conspicuous minerals that have been 
found are tetrahedrite (grey copper), zinc-blende, 
galena, pyrites and native silver. 

The origin of the mineralization has not yet. been 
determmed, but it will no doubt be traced to the more 
recent eruptive rock surrounding it, and near the con- 
tact of which the largest mineralized areas have been 
discovered. It appears, however, as an impregnation 
m the limestone-deposit, and no lines can at present 



80 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




Fig 8. — Citrved Line of Derricks. 

be laid down to trace it to its source, because irregu- 
larity of occurrence, and indefiniteness of shape, appear 
to be its chief characteristics. 

The mineralization is more evident on the surface, 
in the bedding planes of the limestone, which the de- 
composition of the grey copper often colours green, 
whilst crystals of azurite are frequently seen scattered 
along these lines of enrichment. 

Native silver, in leaves or plates, is more particular- 
ly met with on the faces of joint-planes, and may 
have been reduced and deposited there through the 
agency of surface-waters containing organic matter. 
Planes of fracture are common, some showing inci- 
pient movement and others none, but they appear to 
have an important bearing on the deposition of the 
ore,, for in many cases it is found to be richer on one 
side of such planes than upon' the other. 

The opening of the mine has been principally con- 
fined to two areas, one on the Hunter V. claim, at the 
top of the hill, where the face of the quarry at present 
shows a width of over 70 feet of ore; and the other 
on the Double Standard claim, 1,400 feet distant, and 
vertically over 400 feet lower down the hill, where 
the Glory Hole is more than 120 feet wide, showing 
mineralization from side to side. Other outcrops of 
mineral have also been discovered on various parts 
of the property, though not at present opened up. 

This deposit of limestone is unique in the district, 
and until it is further explored, a more comprehensive 
study of the occurrence cannot be made. 

When the quarries are more fully opened out, the 
ore will be delivered into railway-cars at a cost of 4s. 
2d. (1 dollar) or less per ton. 

The ore, up to the time of the writer's visit, averag-"^ 
ed about 13 per cent, of sUica and 44 per cent, of lime; 
at times, the silica had run as low as 9 per cent., and 
the lime had risen to 48 per cent. ; but experience had 
shown that an increase of sUica did not necessarily 
mean a proportionate fall in the percentage of lime. 
These figures show that this ore is a valuable flux to 
the smelters. The ordinary limerock, which is used 
by the various smelters as a flux,. when delivered at 
Nelson or at Trail, costs about 6s. 3d. (1^ dollars) per 
ton, and at Northport 2 s.8^d. (65 cents) per ton; and 
such limerock contains about 48 per cent, of lime and 
8 per cent, of silica. 

In what form the gold and silver are combined has 
not yet been determined, excepting so far as the native 
silver, and the silver contained in the grey copper are 
concerned. The gold-contents have proved to be 
relatively higher- in the Double Standard than in the 



Hunter V. claim, and it is in the former that the most 
siliceous material has been found. 

Conclusion. — These few notes would, the writer 
thinks, be incomplete, without a reference to the 
excellent food provided at the mining camps, fully 
equal to an average hotel; and the cook, particularly 
if he happens to be a white man, receives a much 
higher salary than a good clerk will receive in this 
country. A white cook, who satisfies the miners, is 
a valuable acquisition both to masters and men. 

At some camps, which are in a sense out of touch 
with civilization, there is no actual observance of 
Sunday, because it has been found that its non-obser- 
vance is a lesser evil than idleness. 

The writer's thanks are particularly due to Mr. 
N. Carmichael, Mr. J. J. Campbell, Mr. J. Johnson 
and Mr. W. S. Riblet for the technical details recorded 
in this paper. 



THE NATURE OF ORE DEPOSITS. 

By Dr. Richard Beck, 
Professor of Geology and Economic Geology in the Freiberg 
Mining Academy.* 

(Reviewed by Frank D. Adams, Ph. D.) 

The first edition of Dr. Beck's "Lehre von den Erzlager- 
staten" was published in Berlin in 1901, and was followed by 
a second edition two years later, in 1903. Simultaneously with 
this second edition, a French translation of the work appeared. 
The English translation by Mr. Weed, which has just been 
issued, may be considered as the third edition of the work. 

Mr. Weed states in the preface that he was originally asked 
by the publishers to practically re-write the book from an 
American standpoint, giving greater prominence to American 
ore deposits, but that this idea was abandoned because it would 
involve serious abridgements of the descriptions of important 
foreign localities, which descriptions make the work especially 
valuable to American engineers and geologists. Mr. Weed has 
not, however, confined himself solely to translating the work, 
but has written new descriptions of many American ore deposits 
which have, of recent years, been carefully studied. The no- 
menclature employed in the German edition has in some few 
details been made to conform more closely to American usage, 
but otherwise the book is essentially identical with the last or 
second German edition with the exception of Mr. Weed's ad- 
ditions. In this American edition, however, the book appears 
in a form which is more conveniently handled, the single large 
volume of the German edition ha's'ing been divided into two vol- 
umes. This division has, however, been made, strangely enough 
in the middle of a section without reference to the sense of the 
text, while by adding a few more pages to the first volume a 
much mote suitable division of the subject matter could have 
been obtained. The book is clearly and simply written, and 
is well illustrated by cuts and diagrams. It is the most com- 
prehensive general treatise on the subject of ore deposits which 
we now have in the English language. 

After a preliminary section deaUng with definitions and 
literature, the Classification of Ore Deposits is taken up. 

The classification adopted is as follows: — 

(I). Primary Ore Deposits. — 

A. — Syngenetic; formed simultaneously with the coun- 
try rocks. — 

1. Magmatic segregations. 

2. Sedimentary ores. 

B. — Epigenetic; formed later than the country rock. — 

1. Veins. 

2. Epigenetic deposits other than veins. — 

(a) Epigenetic deposits; formed essentially by an im- 
pregnation of non-calcareous rocks, the deposits 
being generally in distinct beds. 

(b) Epigenetic stocks, formed essentially by a meta- 
somatic replacement of calcareous rock mostly in 
the form of stocks, pockets or stringers. 

(c) Contact metamorphic ore deposits; ore beds and 
stocks formed through contact metamorphism 
caused by Plutonic intrusive masses. 

(d) Ore bearing cavity fillings; deposits formed es- 
sentially by a simple filling of pre-existing cavities 
mostly in the form of stocks or stringers. 



♦Translated and revised by Walter Harvey Weed, E.M., 
Geologist, United States Geological Survey, with 272 figures 
and a map. First edition in two volumes. New York and 
London Engineering and Mining Journal, 1905. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



81 



(I). Secondary Deposits. — 

1. Residual deposits. v 

2. Placer deposits. 

Each of the classes of ore deposits is then taken up in suc- 
cession, and some of the most notable examples described. 

Under the head of Magmatic Segregations, three classes 
are distinguished, namely: — 

(1) . Segregations of native metals. 
I (2) . Segregations of oxide ores. 
^ (3) . Segregations of sulphide and arsenical ores. 
H' With regard to group three it is stated "that the evidence 
^at deposits of this class are direct segregations from a molten 
magma is not as clear and conclusive as it is in the case of groups 
one and two." This it is affirmed is particularly true of the 
Norwegian nickeliferous pyrrhotites, and it is added that recent 
microscopic study has proved that the Sudbury deposits are 
metasomatic replacements and that there is "not a single ex- 
ample of magmatic copper deposits known in North America." 
Whether this conclusion is justified or not, will be discussed in 
a series of papers on these Sudburj' deposits, which will appear 
shortly in the new magazine Economic Geologij, by several gentle- 
men who have devoted special study to these deposits and who 
are in a position to speak authoritatively concerning them. 

The Bedded Ore Deposits which are next considered are 
represented by a large number of occurrences chiefly European, 
-which are well described. Among the American deposits of 
this class are the ores of the iron ranges of Lake Superior. The 
treatment of these is rather inadequate, and it would seem better, 
even at the cost of slightly enlarging the book, to have presented 
a more complete and better balanced account of what are in 
fact the most important iron deposits in the world. In the 
account as given there are some inaccuracies. Thus, on page 
78 the "soft ores" are said to be brown hematite. These ores, 
however, do not hold sufficient water to be so cla.ssed, for while 
undoubtedly specimens of brown hematite can be obtained 
from these soft ores, they, as a class, are essentially red hematite, 
only partially hydrated, the average content of water in the 
Marquette ores being 5.4 per cent, while in the Mesabi range, 
whose product may be said to consist entirely of soft ores, the 
average content of water is only 7 per cent, ^ hile brown hema-tite 
has twice this amount of water. Again, on page 23, the iron 
ores of the Mesabi range are said to belong to the class of inag- 
matic segregations, while on page 80 they are said to have origin- 
ated in the same manner as those of the Penokee-Gogebic and 
other iron ranges of the district, which are classed as sedimentary 
deposits. On page 78, gmnerite is referred to as "almost pure 
jerric silicate in the form of hornblende." In the same class 
are the Clinton ores which also merit a much more extended 
description. 

The Epigenetic Deposits are then taken up, their description 
being prefaced by an excellent "General Description of Mineral 
Veins," treating of their structural relation to the countrj' rock, 
structure of the vein filling, &c., and including a discussion of 
the origin of vein fissures and of the dislocation of veins, faulting, 
&c., which occupies 80 pages. 

The numerous occurrences of voin deposits are grouped 
according to the ore which they contain, and examples of the 
several groups are considered in succession. The definition of 
a vein given by Emmons, "A single mineralized fis.sure, or the 
ore body formed along a single fis.sure," is accepted, although 
Beck states that he "does not entirely agree with S. F. Emmons, 
who attributes the important role in the formation of many 
veins to metasomatic processes, as such processes are always 
regarded by him (R. B.) as subordinate phenomena in vein 
formation." 

Under this class of deposits a good description is given of 
the tin deposits of the Erzgebirge, and it is noted that in the 
case of the Zinnwald occurrences at least "the impregnation 
with tin-stone occurred before the last phase of volcanic activity 
in the region." This is followed by briefer descriptions of the 
Cornish tin deposits, and of the "tin districts" outside of Europe. 

The next section treats of that extremely interesting class 
of deposits which mark the transition between tin deposits of 
the usual type and ordinary mineral veins and which find their 
best exemplifications in the occurrences of the Cerro de Potosi 
and other Bolivian deposits. Under this heading are also de- 
scribed the veins of I5utte, Montana, and the native copper 
deposits of Lake Superior are here taken up as a whole, although 
few of the important deposits of this region are really veins. 
This latter very important district is also one which merits a 
more extended description, the conglomerate deposits being 
disposed of in some six lines. The opinion is expressed that 
"genetically these deposits are best explicable by the assumption 
of a lateral secretion of the copper ores which were originally 
finely distributed in the melaphyres, the only enigma being 
why the secretion and concentration took the form of native 
copper." 

It is noted in the discussion of the silver lead veins that 
the three types of these veins recognized by Herder in the 



Freiberg district have been found to exist with but little variety 
in the mineral districts of all parts of the globe, "so that they 
are really of universal application." These are: (1) the pyritic 
lead quartz veins, (2) the high grade galena veins with carbon- 
ated gangue, and (3) the galena barite veins. The veins of 
these classes in the Freiberg district are described in detail, and 
a good map, showing the distribution of the se^'eral .systems of 
veins in this classical locality is given. Representatives of the 
several classes in many other parts of the world are also described 
and compared with respective occurrences in the Freiberg 
district. 

The veins of the rich cobalt silver ores of the Joachimsthal 
and Annaberg districts, to which the recently discovered veins 
of the Cobalt district of Ontario are so closely allied, are then 
described in detail. I; is mentioned that as early as 1.517 a 
mining settlement existed in the Joachimsthal district, and that 
in 1518 the first " Joachimsthaler" was minted, this coin now 
being known as the "Thaler." It is stated that .special atten- 
tion is now being paid in these districts to the extraction of uran- 
ium. 

In connection with the gold quartz veins, their close rela- 
tion to pegmatite intrusions is noted. During the cooling of a 
body of granite magma, the water and the various gaseous 
compounds became more and more concentrated in the residual 
mother liquor during the crystallization of the magma. The 
residual solutions, penetrating into fissures, deposited vein 
quartz together with vein substances and non-silicated com- 
pounds, which were comparatively uniformly distributed in the 
molten magma but which gradually retreated into the residual 
water. 

Having described these deposits, an abrupt break is made- 
and the "General Description of Veins" is resumed and con, 
tinued through forty pages. The statement made to the effect 
that this description is continued from page 226 is evidently 
a misprint, as it is really continued from page 195. This section 
takes up the consideration of "Differences in Vein Content at 
Different Depths," which are considered under the heads of 
changes in primarj- filling and due to secondary alteration; "the 
Distribution of Ore within the Vein' ' ; the " Influence of the 
Country Rock on the richness of Lodes"; "the Influence of 
the Vein Intersections on Ore Content;" "the Influence of 
Converging and Diverging Stringers on the Content of Veins' ' ; 
"Action of Vein Solutions upon the Wall Rock," &c. 

Under the changes in the character of primary ore filling, 
the progressive replacement of galena by zinc blend and pyrite 
in depth is noted in the case of a number of well known occurren- 
ces, as, for instance, in the Freiberg veins, in those of the Upper 
Harz, in the silver lead ores of the Castle Mountain and Barker 
districts of Montana, as well as in the Elkhorn deposits. This 
same change has also been observed in other cases not mentioned 
by the authors, as in the Joplin district of Missouri, which is 
mentioned by Van Hise, and in the silver lead veins of the 
Kootenay district of Briti.sh Columbia. This change, however, 
in the case of the Missouri occurrences is regarded by Van Hise 
not as one of the primary ore filling but as due to the secondary 
action set up by descending waters. 

The superficial alteration of ore deposits in the zone of 
weathering and the various classes of products resulting from 
this, are then described at length. 

The "Action of the Vein forming Solutions upon the Wall 
Rock" are taken up and considered under the heads of "Serici- 
tization", "Kaolinization", " Propylitization", " Silicification", 
"Alteration of limestones into ore-bearingp yroxene-epidote 
Rocks", "Tourmalinization" and "Topazitization" and "the 
Metasomatic replacement of the country rock by Ore." 

There is inserted at this point a "Review of the various 
Theories of the origin of Mineral Veins." These are classified as 
follows: — 

(1) . Congeneration Theory. 

(2) . Descension Theory. 

(3) . Lateral Secretion Theory. 

(4) . Ascension Theories. 

(a) The Igneous Injection Theory. 
(6) The Sublimation Theory, 
(c) The Hydrothennal Theory. 

Numbers 1 and 2 may now be said to be of merely historical 
interest and with regard to the theory of Lateral Secretion, the 
opinion is expressed "that any general application of the theory 
is decidedly impracticable," although a few occurrences are 
mentioned which may have originated in this way. The Igneous 
Injection Theory is also of merely historic interest although it 
has lately been resuscitated by Weinschenk and applied to 
the pyrite deposit of Bodenmais. The authors maintain that 
the Hydrothennal Theory affords the true explanation of the 
origin of mineral veins. "We maintain that the original for- 
mation of most ore bodies is due to thermal water rising from 
great depths. These thermal waters are believed to be the after- 
effects of Plutonic eruptions, such as the intrusion of granitic 
masses; also of volcanic events in the narrower sense." It is 



82 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



not clear however, whether these thermal waters which are the 
after-effect of volcanic action are regarded by Beck as "juvenile" 
waters in the sense of Suess, or are waters which having percolated 
from the surface have been rendered especially active agents of 
solution and deposition by the heat communicated to them by 
the intrusions in question. 

The description .of "Epigenetic ore deposits in Stratified 
Rocks' is then taken up, and a large number of occurrences are 
described, among the more important of which is the Mansfield 
"Kupferschafer" and the Transvaal gold-bearing conglomerates. 
With regard to the former, the authors do not believe that the 
copper was derived from any process of direct precipitation from 
the ocean waters in which its shale was laid down, but point out 
that "wherever the formations comprehended under the name 
Kuperschiefer are ore-bearing, the Zechstein and its underlying 
rocks are found traversed by numerous fis.sures which have in 
part the character of mineral veins. The generally recognized 
fact that with few exceptions the amo\mt of copper in the shale 
increases on approaching these fissures and dislocations is direct 
evidence in favour of impregnation from the fissures." 

The Transvaal gold-bearing conglomerates are described in 
considerable detail, and the various theories which have been 
proposed to account for the gold in them are discussed, that which 
accounts for the subsequent inti-oduction of the gold by the 
invasion of the porous conglomerates by gold bearing solutions 
being preferred. 

The term epigenetic ore stock is given to all stock shaped, 
pocket shaped and tube shaped ore bodies found in limestone or 
dolomites, and which are formed by the nietasomatic replace- 
ment of the carljonates by ores and accompanying minerals. 
Among the examples of these, the spathic iron ores of the Bilbao 
District; the copper deposits of Bisbee, Arizona; the ore de- 
posits of Laurium; the lead and zinc deposits of the Mississippi 
valley and others are described. Beck considers that in the case 
of the last mentioned "the presence of darite and fluorite, in 
fact the entire mineral assemblage of the deposits, so closely 
resenibling that of the genuine silver-lead veins of hydrothermal 
origin, indicates that the hydrothermal theory is the correct one, 
especially since it will hardly be proved that the zinc and lead 
contents of the limestone were not themselves introduced by sub- 
sequent infiltration." A similar origin is attributed to the 
Leadville deposits. 

The Contact Metamorphic Ore Deposits, to which an ever 
increasing number of ore deposits is being referred, embraces ore 
bodies formed within stratified rocks under the influence of 
contact metamorphism near or along the boundarj' between 
plutonic eruptive masses and stratified rocks. The most im- 
portant criterion for the recognition of these deposits is considered 
to be their mineralogical composition, the ore being characterized 
by the presence of certaiii minerals which we know elsewhere to be 
typical of igneous contact zones, e.g. Garnet, Wollastonite, 
■ Vesuvianite, Andahisite, Cordierite, Scapolite, &c. There is, 
as is pointed out, a very close genetic relationship between ore 
bodies of this class and magmatic ore segregations. 

The Contact ore deposits of Banat, Hungarj-; those of the 
Christiania Region and of the Island of Elba, with a number of 
others, are described as examples of this class of ore bodies, 
which is one one that merits a much more close and thorough 
study than has heretofore been given to it. 

The work closes with the consideration of the several 
classes of detrital deposits. 

The book is an excellent one and is especially useful to the 
English speaking student as presenting a description of many 
foreign ore deposits, information concerning which is otherwise 
to be found only by extended search through a great mass of 
literature. The book, however, might be improved if the material 
were in a measure re-arranged by discussing for instance the 
origin of the epigenetic deposits in one section instead of taking 
up the question of origin in connection with each subdivision 
separately, for the same reasoning applies to all these deposits 
irrespective of shape. 

The type employed for the headings of the various sections 
might also be made more distinctive as in the German edition 
which, in this respect, is much clearer. There also seems to be 
some mistake with regard to the statement on the title page 
that the book is illustrated by 272 figures, as only 257 can be 
discovered by the Reviewer. These, however, are minor faults, 
and the book is one which every one interested in this most 
important branch of Geology will welcome. 



BEQUEST FOR MASSACHUSSETTS TECH. 

The late Frank Harvey Cilley, engineer, has bequeathed 
th(! r(!sidue of his estate, which will probably amount to .i;7(),0()0, 
to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the purchase 
of suitable books, photographs, casts, anatomical models and 
statuary for the lil)rary and gymnasium of thi; propo.sed Walker 
Memorial gynuiasium, or for special lectures on j)hysical culture. 



MODERN METHODS IN SHAFT SINKING. 

A few years ago there would have been no benefit in using 
large engines during sinking, as the progress of the work at the 
bottom of the shaft was so slow that the debris could easily 
be wound by self-contained engines, with a drum of .3 or 4 feet 
in diameter. But now that the sinking progres.ses more quickly 
it is essential to wind rapidely. ( )f course safetv must not be over- 
looked, as it is certain to be a serious matter if anything happens 
to the bucket whilst it is in the shaft or when 'it is being un- 
loaded at the top. By means of the ropes and rider the bucket is 
steadied during its journey, and passes up and down the shaft 
at a rapid rate more safely than was formerly possible at a slow 
wind. By using folding doors many dangers during banking 
are avoided, as the pit top is completelv closed down during the 
greater part of the time. It will thus be seen that although 
the use of large engines may at one time have been of doubtful 
advantage there is no reason for doubting their advantages 
whenever the \\ inding arrangements described are installed. 



Investigation of the effects of fine grinding on cyanida- 
tion has resulted in instituting similar studies regarding amal- 
gamation. It is doubtful, however, whether it will be found 
that fine grinding improves amalgamation, The eon.sensus of 
opinion of experienced stamp mill men is that crushing finer 
than thirty or forty mesh hinders, rather than aids, amalgama- 
tion. On the other hand, a cyanide expert- of prominence has 
recently stated that one of the discoveries resulting from fine 
grinding is that greater returns can be obtained on the plates 
froin the slime product. The practice mentioned consi.sts in 
flowing the pulp over ordinary silvered plates and then, after 
fine grinding, over shaking plates. While the.se opinions are 
widely different, they undoubtedly have foundation, and tend 
to show the necessity of individual'treatment for individual ores. 



THE ZINC DUTY. 

The Daily News has it that a duty has been imposed on 
zinc sulphides entering the United States. It is well known 
that the agitation has been steadily kept alive by the Joplin 
producers, and only recently has the question been before the 
Attorney-General of the United States. The imposition will 
not hurt the producer in the Slocan. Its one effect will be to 
force the smelting of the ores in Canada, and the prices 
paid will be fully as high as tho.se paid in the States. This 
in the face of the local plant not yet having time to perfect the 
practice. Once that is perfected and the costs known, the 
United States competition will never be missed. 

It must be maddening to the Great Northern railway to 
have the effort to serve the United States market treated with 
so little sympathy. Just what they will do now in the way of 
providing markets for the zinc production in their territories is 
a problem. The Frank plant can now meet any competition 
and with the duty of 20 per cent can more than worst it. 

The only other market available is Europe, and it cannot 
conipare with Frank. The attitude of the local plant toward 
this production is one of indifference. If any proposition is 
made it must come from the Great Northern. " There is plenty 
of zinc available, independent of that territory. The matter 
is up to the producers and the railway to scrap it out among 
themselves. 

[Sandon Standard]. 

THE CASSIAR COAL FIELDS. 

(By Our Special Correspondent). 

One of the most promising of the hitherto unworked coal 
fields of British Columbia is to be found in the Telkwa Valley 
of the Cassiar District, where the Cassiar Coal Development Co. 
has 52 square miles, all of which, so far as investigation has gone, 
being underlaid with several seams of coal of excellent quality, 
and only waiting for transportation facilities to develop into an 
important industry. The line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Rail- 
way is expected to pass near to or through the property, while 
a charter also controlled by the G.T.P.' exists for a road to 
Kitamaat Ann, 80 miles distant, a land locked harbour connect- 
ing with the Pacific Ocean. 

The coal field was discovered in 1901, bv Mr. William Limin 
when prospecting for gold and copper. In 1902 a party of 
flualified men, equipped with a diamond drill and other tools 
went in, and they have made a throrough examination, which 
shows the extent and richness of the deposit. Professor Cole- 
man, of the School of Practical Science, Toronto, was sent out 
the same year, and his report fully bears out the results arrived 
at by the first explorers. He reached the following conclusions: 
Tat the coal is of good bituminous quality, burning well and 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



8 




Sk.\m No. 1 . 

standing the weather excellently, unlike lignite coals; that it is 
apparently of the same age and general character as the best 
coals mined on the Pacific slope; that seams of coal, from ,3 
to 15 feet thick, occur from point to point along the valley. 
In 1904 Mr. A. Webster, formerly of the fieological Survey, 
visited the locality, and in a letter to Mr. Limin and Mr. Davis 
his associate, says he considers it of the verj- first quality, both 
as a coking and a steam coal. "I have never," he says, "seen 
better coal in British Columbia." He gives a section of the strata 
in descending order as follows: — 

Feet 

Ash, rock, drift, etc 100 

Top seam of coal (Xo. 1) .' '. 20 

Clay shale 25 

Coal seam (Xo. 2) 15 

Clav shale 4 

Coal seam (Xo. 3) • 2* 

Clay shale 40 

Coal seam (Xo. 4) 4 

Clay shale 35 

Coal seam (X'o. 5) ; 14 



This gives a total thickness of coal over 50 feet. Allowing 
one million tons for each foot to the square mile the amount of 
coal in sight would be the enormous total of 25,100,000,000 tons. 
The company expect to mine 3,000,000 tons a year, so that the 
deposit would not be exhausted for nearly a thousand years. 

The seams crop out on Goat and Mud Creeks, which are 
tributaries of the Telkwa. The latter flows into the Buckley 
which in turn empties into the Skeena near Hazelton, up to 
which point steamers ascend.- From there supplies are taken 
in by pack train over a good trail. The Telkwa and Buckley 
Valleys are very fertile and a number of claims have been taken 
up, but until railway communication is established settlement 
will necessarily be slow. As an instance of the fertility of the 
soil Mr. Limin obtained from 5 sacks of potatoes planted as seed 
150 sacks. Wheat, oats, barley, peas, and garden truck of all 
kinds grow readily. The elevation is about 2,000 feet above 
the sea. 

Tests with the diamond drill show that the seams dip to- 
wards the north and east, and that there is considerable faulting. 
A hole near the northern boundary penetrated 130 feet into the 
overlying sandstone without reaching the coal, when operations 
had to be suspended by the breaking of the drill. The deposit 
is underlayed by conglomerate. 

An interesting featvn-e of the deposit is the ash beds which 
are found in some places. Fire seems to have eaten its way into 
the seams, probably from Indian camp fires, and having burned 
the coal the overlying rock has fallen down, smothering the fire 
and leaving the ash beds. 

The only coal mined so far was for the use of the prospectors. 
They burned it for three months in a stove without having a 




Seam No. .5. 



clinker. Tests show that it is low in ash and .sulphur. It is 
very solid and can be mined with little waste. There is plenty 
of timber and water on the spot, so necessaiy in coal mining 
operations. 

The Cassiar Coal Development Co., which is composed 
principally of Toronto and Hamilton men, took out a license 
after the first discovery, and after development work had 
established the value of tha deposit, obtained a lease. They are 
now negotiating with English capitalists for the sale of a large 
interest in the property. The latter have put up a deposit as 
a guarantee of good faith, and ^^'ill close if the property comes 
up to representations when examined by their expert in the 
spring. Some stock was sold by the Cassiar Development Co., 
but none is now on the market. Some small claims have been 
aken up on adjoining properties. 

The accompanying illustrations show seams X^os. 1, 2 and 
5 where they are exposed on the banks of Goat Creek. 



THE WORLD'S PETROLEUM SUPPLY. 



The United States supplied more than one-half of the 
petroleum produced in the world in 1904. A statement of the 
world's production of petroleum, prepared by the British Board 
of Trade, which has just reached the Bureau of Statistics of the 




84 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Department of Cominerc-e and Labor of tlie United l-itates, puts 
the petroleum production of the world in 1904 at 9,303,0()0,0()() 
gallons, of which 4,916,000,000 gallons werep reduced in the 
United States, 3,650,000,000 gallons in Russia, 202,500,000 
gallons in Austria, 206,500,000 gallons in Java and Sumatra, 
135,000,000 gallons in Rouinania, 105,500,000 gallons in British 
India (principally Burma), 49,000,000 gallons in .Japan, 20,000,- 
000 gallons in Canada, and 18,500,000 gallons in (iermany. 

These figures give the grand total of 9,303,000,000 gallons 
of petroleum production in 1904, a total which far exceeds that 
of any earlier year, In 1903, which made the highest record 
of any vear prior to 1904, the total was hut S,504,000,000; in 
1902 it was 7,588,000,000. This increase in 1903 and 1904 occurs 
chiefly in the United States. The figures of production in the 
United States show an inci-ease of about 697 million gallons in 
1904 o\'er the figures of 1903, while those of Russia, our chief 
competitor in oil production, show an increase of but 103 million 
gallons over 1903, and the increase in the United States in 1903 
is also much larger than that of Russia. In the four years 1898, 
1899, 1900, and 1901, Russian production of crude" petroleum 
exceeded that of the United States, but in all other years for 
which the record is shown by the publication in c|uestion, ex- 
tending from 1883 to 1904, the production of the United States 
exceeds that of Russia, and by far exceeds that of any other 
country. Indeed it may bo said that the United States and 
Russia produce practically nine-tenths of the petroleum of the 
world, the total production in 1904, as abo^•e shown, being 
9,303,000,000 gallons, of which 8,566,000,000 was produced ni 
the ITnited States and R\issia combined. 

Exportation of illuminating oil, or kerosene as it is familiarly 
called, is also much greater from the United States than froiii 
Russia, especially as American crude oil gives a much larger 
per cent, of illuminating oil than does that of Russia. The total 



WATER AS A DIAMOND CATCHER. 



The vexed and extreme difficult problem of the automatic 
sorting of diamonds from the concentrates whicfi leave the 
washing machines has had the close attention of engineers all 
over the workl. It was not until the De lieers Company dis- 
covered, patented and made use of grease as a diamond catcher 
that it could be said that inventors had got any nearer to a 
solution of the problem. No one quite knows how it is that 
diamonds adhere to grease, while most other substances pa.ss 
over the plates and escape its influence. That such is the case, 
however, has long since become an accepted fact, and the theory 
which attributes the action of the grease-catcher to adhesion 
or surface contact to be correct may be true. Certain it is that 
grease-plates catch 100 per cent, of' the diamonds which are fed 
over theii- surface, and in this respect the system may be said 
to have attained perfection, (iravitation has nothing to do 
with the working of the grease diamond-catcher, but the con- 
centrates, after leaving the washing machines, have been sorted 
roughly by gravitation in the pulsator before they arrive at the 
grease tallies. In this machine, to be described, separation is 
effected by gravitation pure and simple, and the medium which 
operates it is water. It is claimed that this machine will render 
the use of the pulsator and grease-plate unnecessarj'. This, of 
course, would be the case if all the surrounding substances are 
of a smaller specific gravity than the diamonds. In practice, 
however, as far as South African concentrates are concerned, 
this is not so. If the mass of stones, etc., which fall within the 
range of the specific gravity of diamonds is so great as to render 
hand-sorting a tedious and expensive process, then the grease- 
catcher will still have to be resorted to. In that case the machine 
will merely take the place of the pulsator. Its advantages over 




AFRICAN ENntrtCtR:MO. 



Eight Stage Diamond Separator for separating Concentrates, by the Automatic Gem and Gold Separator Syndicate, of London. 

Longitudinal Elevation. 



cpiantity of refined illuminating oil, exported from Russia in 
1904 was 455 million gallons, and from the United States 761 
million gallons. Russian exports go largely to southwestern 
Europe, northern Africa, and southern and eastern Asia, while 
western Europe, eastern Asia, Oceanica and North and South 
America are the most important markets of the United States. 
Of the 876 million gallons of refined oil of all classes (including 
naphthas and lubricating oil) exported from the United States 
in the calendar year 1904, 201 million gallons went to the United 
Kingdom, 117 millions to Germany, 112 millions to Netherlands, 
41 millions to Belgium, 24 millions to France, 74 millions to 
other countries of Europe. In eastern Asia 70 million gallons 
went to China, 39 millions to Japan, and 24 millions to Hong- 
kong, while 25 million gallons went also to southern Asia under 
the general title of British East Indies, and 26 million gallons 
to British Australasia. In America the distribution was to 
Brazil 20 million gallons, Argentine Republic 16 millions, British 
North America 19 millions. Chili 6 millions, Central America 2 
millions, Cuba 2 millions, and Mexico 1 million. 

Petroleum has formed of late years an important factor in 
the exportation of the United States. Prior to 1905 it was the 
largest single item in the statement of exports of manufactures, 
l)ut in that year copper for the first time exceeded petroleum in 
the value of exports. The total value of all classes of iron and 
steel manufactures (!X|)ort.(!d, of coin-se, exceeds by far the total 
of pirlroleum, but no single item in the group entitled iron and 
steel manufactun^s is as large as the item of illuminating oil under 
the general head of refined mineral oil exported. 'J'he total value 
of iron and steel maniifactures of all cla.sses exported in the de- 
cade; ending with 1905 was $943,886,511, of refined mineral oil 
$622,313,702, and copper aiul manufactures thereof $444,878,5.52, 
while the next largest item is leather, $272, .534, 502, and cotton 
manufactures, $2.59,136,044. — Mining Reporter. 



this are that it possesses no moving parts, is subject to no wear 
and tear, and is far more compact and convenient. The machine 
in question is the invention of Mr. W. S. Lockhart, and is being 
introduced conjointly by the Automatic Gem and Gold-Separator 
Syndicate, of 10, St.'Swithin's Lane, and the Pulsometer Engine- 
ering Company, of London and Reading, who are the manufac- 
turers. 

A glance at the line drawing will .show that the plant con- 
sists of eight similar units, and a ninth of slightlj^ different 
design. Each unit consists of a classifier and separator, and an 
elsvating device connects each pair of units. The only differ- 
ence between the several sections is that each is adjusted to deal 
with different-sized material. The number of units is not, of 
course, confined to eight, the number A'arying with local condi- 
tions. 

The operation of the machine is as follows: The concentrates 
from the washing machines are dvmiped into the grizzley shown 
at the right hand of the drawing, and then picked up by the 
main elevator, unless the grizzley can be so arranged that the 
materials will gravitate to the machine. The elevator delivers 
into a hopper, from which the materials fall into the first class- 
ifier. The classifier consists of a drum, covered with wire cloth- 
ing, or plates perforated with square holes. The perforations 
of the first drum will, in the instance under consideration, pass 
f-in. material and everything under. Within the classifier 
drum there is a fixed spiral. The drum is made to rotate, and 
given a shaking motion at the same time by means of the levers 
shown. This assists in puddling any clayey material that the 
washers may have passed. The oversize from the classifier finds 
its way out at the end of the drum into a revolving feeder, which 
delivers the materials in an even stream to the receiving hopper 
of the first separator below. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



85 



The separator is a simple contrivance. A stream of water 
is made to flow upwards in the anmilus between two cylinders. 
The materials to be separated are fed into the annulus, at right 
angles to the stream of water, through a circmaferential slit in 
the outer cylinder. The rate of flow of the water is adjusted 
until it carries all the matter of a less specific gra\-ity than the 
diamonds with it, and disoharges them into a tailings chute. 
The diamonds, together with any heavier matter, sink against 
the current of water, and are collected in the receptacles marked 
R. These are locked \ip, and can only be opened by someone 
in authority. 

To return to the classifier and follow the course of the under- 
size from the first drum, which will all he of dimensions less than 
J-in, it is collected in a hopper below the first drum, and, in the 
instance shown in the illustration, taken thence to the second 
classifier by a bticket elevator. An improvement is, however, 
being introduced, in which this transference is also affected by 
a current of water — a much more simple and effective device. 
The dnmi of the second classifier is provided with j-in. holes 
Hence the second separator only has to separate materials rang- 
hig in size from |-in, to J-in," Everything below ^-in, pa.sses 
on from the second to the third classifier, where a further selec- 
tion takes place. This process is repeated in each of the eight 
imits until the last unit has only to deal with J-in. materials. 
The undersize from the eighth cfassificr is all passed through a 
large, ninth, separator, which acts as save-all, and secures any 
ver\' small diamonds. The tailings from the several separators 
are' collected in a common chute, or disposed of in any other 
convenient way. If the supply of wat^r is limited, it can be 
strained out of'the taihngs and used over and over again, muddi- 
ness not being detrimental to the working of the machine. 

The photograph which we reproduce shows a small plant, 
Avhich has been installed to test the tailings from some pans 
used in washing for rubies. Two or three per cent, of the taihngs 
from some pans used in washings for rubies. Two or three per 
cent, of the tailings are passed through the separator to show 
whether the pans are doing their work properly or not. The 
machine in question handles from six to eight tons a day. 

It was on a machine very similar to this that the tests which 
we witnessed were carried out. Se^•eral diamonds were placed 
in a q\iantity of gravel. Each time this was passed through 
the separator all the diamonds were, without fail, extracted. 
Small nuggets of gold and alluvial tin were also separated from 
fine gravel with equal success, but the most remarkable test of 
all was made with gold dust. Two small particles of gold, so 
fine that they could only be picked up by wetting a finger, 
■were placed in about a quart of silver-sand. This was passed 
through the machine at a good speed, yet both pieces of gold were 
recovered, and all surrounding matter was eliminated. 

Several of these separators are in use in Brazil and else- 
where, but none as yet have found their way to South Africa. 

[The foregoing interesting article appeared in Afi-ican 
Engineering, and is reproduced in consequence of inquiries 
addressed to the Review for apparatus which might be used in 
Canada. We think it also of interest to ■)uy readers genarally 
interested in concentration methods. — Ed ' 



REPORT OF THE DOMINION COAL COMPANY, 
LIMITED. 



The Directors' report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1905 was 
as follows: — 

The output of 1905 was 3,189,657 tons, as compared with 
3,023,522 tons for 1904. 

The net earnings from the operation of the Company's mines, 
steamships, raOway, stores, rents, etc., for the year 1905 were 
$1,-573,832.19, as compared with $1,620,475.33 for the year 1904. 

The general business of the Company during 1905 was well 
up to the standard of 1904, but the largely increased require- 
ments of the Dominion Iron and Steel Company necessitated an 
increased output from the mines, and as the contract with that 
Company is not at present a remunerative one, the average 
price realized from sales in 1905 was consequently less than in 
1904. The decrease in net earnings shown above would, how- 
ever, have been greater but that the operating expenses, outside 
actual cost of mining, were considerably reduced. 

The surplus earnings, after providing for interest on bonds, 
preferred stock dividend, etc., have been added to the Company's 
general surplus, against which account have been charged ex- 
penses of reorganizing the Company's securities and an amount 
to represent depreciation in value of merchandise in the Com- 
pany's stores. 



Developjient Work. — Steady progress has been made 
with the opening and . equipment of the new mine known as 
Dominion No. 6 on the Phelan Seam, and a substantial daily 
output will be obtained from this mine after the opening of the 
St. Lawrence navigation this year. 

The Emery Seam, is now being worked through the old 
workings at Dominion No. 5 (Reserve); shafts are also being 
.sunk to this seam at Reserve and at Dominion No. (i, and it is 
expected that by the opening of navigation the work will be so 
far advanced that this .seam will yield an output of about one 
thousand tons per day. 

Development work at the other mines has been continuously 
carried on and is now well in advance of the workings. 

Contracts for an electric plant situated at Dominion No. 
2 have been let. This plant will be used for furnishing the auxi- 
liaiy power required at the mines for pmnping, \cntilati()n and 
miderground haulage, etc. The general adoption of shearing 
machines and the increased requirements of th(> coal cutting ma- 
chines will practically exhaust the capacity of the compressed air 
plants at the different mines leaving such auxiliary require- 
ments unprovided for. The central electric plant is needed to 
make good this deficiency, and will also carry out the work more 
economically than under present conditions. 

Your Directors recognizing that an ample equipment of 
rolling stock, particularly cars, is a necessity for rapid delivery, 
for avoiding delays to ships and for saving in operating expenses 
generally, decided this year to purchase one hundred and fifty 
50-ton steel cars at a cost of -1162,000. The greater number of 
the Company's wooden cars have been remodelled and prac- 
tically rebuilt in the Company's own shops, and this part of the 
equipment is now in a thoroughly efficient and serviceable con- 
dition; this repair work has been charged to operating expenses. 

The total amount expended during the year 1905 on capi- 
tal account, including the above purchase of steel cars, is 1497,- 
605.19. 

All other development work, renewals and repairs have 
been charged against operation. 

Fix.\xci.\L Position. — It will be noticed from a perusal 
of the annexed balance sheet, that the Company's financial 
position has greatly improved during the year 1905. In May 
of that year the Shareholders gave their approval to a scheme 
for the re-arrangement and consolidation of the indebtedness 
of the Company, the main features of which were the substitu- 
tion of an issue of $5,000,000 5% Bonds in place of the out- 
standing .S2,435,000 6% Bonds, and $2,380,000 Time Notes; 
and the substitution of an issue of .13,000,000 7% Preferred 
Stock in place of a like amount of 8% Preferred Stock. These 
changes, which, besides other advantages, will effect a large 
saving in fixed charges, necessitated a considerable outlay in 
premiums on old securities redeemed and other expenses, which 
amoiuit your Directors have written off from the general sur- 
plus. 

Gener.\l. — The Company has laid before its employees a 
scheme for the purcha.se of their homes on the instalment 
plan, such as exists at other collieries in this country and abroad, 
ajid it is expected that this will be largely taken advantage of 
by the men. The workmen will gain thereby in becoming 
owners of their houses on paying a little more than their present 
monthly rent, while it is hoped the Company will also gain by 
securing the services of a steady, permanent body of employees. 

Your Directors, following a well defined plan for future 
operations, have, during the year 1905, made large expendi- 
tures for necessary equipment and for development to pro- 
vide for the natural exhaustion of the older workings, and in 
order to continue this programme it will be necessary to make 
similar expenditures in 1906. It may, however, be pointed out 
that in so far as these expenditures are chargeable to capital 
account the amount so expended to the extent of 75 per cent 
of the outlay may, if deemed advisable, be subsequently capi- 
talized (after 1st November, 1906) by issuing the additional 
$2,000,000 First Mortgage Bonds or any part thereof at present 
retained in the Company's treasury. Meantime, your Direc- 
tors have considered it the wiser policy to postpone payment 
of dividend on the common stock for the present. They trust 
that the Shareholders wiU approve these conservative measures, 
which, in wiping off the floating debt and providing liberally 
for the efficient equipment and development of the mines, re- 
move impediments to the distribution of future profits; and 
these, setting aside the possibility of unforeseen accidents, may 
confidently be anticipated to result from the continued prospe- 
rity of the Company's operations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES ROSS, 

President. 



86 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



BALANCE SHEET 
AS AT DECEMBER 31st. 1905 (compared with Dec. 31st, 1904). 



BALANCKS. 



ASSETS: 

Property Account a,s per last Report 



Less 

Written off for Depreciation 



Add Capital Expenditure since. 



Cash in Banks and Offices 

Accounts Receivable 

Coal on hand 

New Supplies in Stores and Warehouses 

In.surance paid in advance 

Steamship Hire paid in advance 

Cash and securities in New England Trust Com- 
pany for Sinking Fund 

Securities of other Companies 



LL\BILITIES: 

Capital Stock, Common 

" " Preferred 

SpFirst Mortgage Bonds 

Mortgages 

ape Bi-eton Real Estate Debentures 
_ Cominion Rolling Stock Debentures . 
Amount payable Dominion Steel Co. . 



Accrued Dividend — Preferred 

Unpaid Royalty 

Accounts Payable 

Notes Payable 

Bond Interest, Accrued 

Contingent Fund 

Sinking Fund, Accrued 



SURPLUS: 

Balance from previous years 
For current vear 



Less 

Written off to provide for reorganisation ofl 
Securities and depreciation in value of Mer-i 
chandise in Stores ! I 



For Year Ending Dec. 31, 
1904. 



22,600,597.83 
130,569.81 



22,470,028 . 02 
500,487 . 98 



151,746.73 
702,360.50 
262,715.52 
795,928 . 76 
31, 692 .52 
35,620.90 

261,966.84 
191,000.63 



15,000,000.00 
3,000,000 . 00 
2,435,000 . 00 
72,000.00 
394,421.58 
298,559.47 
2,380,000.00 



120,000.00 
84,056.62 
200,937 . 56 
71,000.00 
58,250.00 
54,915.68 

117,157.10 



226,912.13 
890,338 . 28 



22,970,516.00 



For Year Ending Dec. 31 
1905. 



22,970,516.00 
144,844.60 



22,825,671.40 
497,605.19 



251,550.82 
825,083 . 70 
302,400.46 
763,257.09 
19,360.98 
22,234.87 



2,433,032.40 



25,403,548.40 



23,579,981.05 



189,964.63 



15,000,000.00 
3,000,000.00 
5,000,000 . 00 
72,000.00 
353,785.08 
265,413.46 



706,316.94 



1,117,250..41 



25,403,548.40 



PROFIT & LOSS ACCOUNT 
FOR YEAR 1905 (compared with 1904) 



41,666.66 
73,583.31 



2,140,921.79 
746,797.05 



87,500.00 
97, 833 . 12 
311,222.77 



1,117,250.41 
1,023,671.38 



23,323,276.59 



2,373,852.55 
25,697,129.14 



23,691,198.54 



611,805.86 



1,394,124.74 
25,697,129.14 





For Year Ending Dec. 31, 1904 


For Year Ending Dec. 31, 1905 


Net Proceeds from Sale of Coal and Net Income 
from Steamships, Railway, Stores, Real Estate, etc 

Less 

Misc. Interest and Pn^iriium on Bonds retired .... 
Sinking l'"uiul luulcr former Trust Deed. . . 


148,818.16 
240,000.00 
202,996 . 24 
138,322.65 


1,620,475.33 
730,137.05 


212,249.73 
220,916.04 
96,679.94 
20,315.10 




1,573,832.19 

550,160.81 






890,338 . 28 


1,023,671.38 



Certified correct, 



J. R. BLACKETT, 



A udiior. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



87 



THE STATIONARY ENGINEERS OF ONTARIO. 



The Stationan' Engineers of Ontario, who number in the 
vicinity of 10,000, are petitioning the Ontario Government for an 
amencfment to their present Aft, making certificates necessary in 
the interests of public safety. The amendment suggested has 
taken the form of the following draft bill, which the Society of 
Stationarj' Engineers request us to publish: — 

An amendment to an Act respecting Stationary Engineers, 
Victoria 54, Chapter 141, Revised Statutes, 1897, "Chapter 31, 
annual 1891. 

By and with the consent of the Lieut. -Governor-in-Council, 
and by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative 
Assembly of the Province of Ontario, be it enacted that this 
Act be amended by expunging all of it up to the words "casting 
vote" in section 13 thereof, and the following be inserted in lieu 
thereof : 

1. The Lieut .-Governor-in-Council appoint a board consist- 
ing of a chainnan and members for the purpose of examin- 
ing applicants and granting of certificates to all persons operating 
Steam boilers of 50 horsepower or over. 

2. It shall be unlawful for any person to operate any boiler 
of 50 horsepower or over imless he has a certificate, granted 
under the provisions of this Act. 

3. It shall be unlawful for any person to employ an engineer 
to take charge of a boiler of -50 horse power or over unless such 
person holds a certificate under the provisions of the Act, and 
any person who shall be guilty of operating, or any employer 
who shall employ any person to operate, a boiler contrary to this 
Act, shall be deemed to have committed a misdemeanor and 

shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than dollars and 

not more than dollars for each offence. 

4. Every engineer who shall be in charge of any steam plant 
coming under the provisions of this Act at the time it comes 
into force or any engineer who has had two years' experience 
and who applies before the expiry of one year, shall, upon 
proving his character and upon paying the prescribed fee, 
receive a certificate for the tenn of two years, and such certifi- 
cate must be renewed from time to time as it expires, provided, 
however, the Board shall have power to revoke any certificate 
upon proof of incapacity, drunkenness, or improper conduct. 

5. Any person who feels himself aggrieved by the decision of 
the Board of Examiners, shall have the right (upon notice being 
given to that effect) to appeal to the Minister of Agriculture. 

6. All candidates for certificates, except as provided for in 
section 4, shall furnish evidence of their good character, and of 
having at least three years' experience, either as assistants in 
an engine room, or boiler room, or as having full charge, and 
shall submit to such examination, written or oral, as the Board 
may determine. 

7. All certificates shall at all times be exposed to view in 
some conspicuous place in the boiler or engine room, and the 
failure to expose same will be prima facie evidence of the lack 
of qualification under the Act. 

8. All fees for examination shall not exceed $ and all 

renewal fees shall not exceed $ . 



The London Economist, imder the date of January 27th, 
prints a very interesting letter from Mr. F. W. Rolt, at one time 
of Rossland," and lately a director in the Le Roi Mining Company. 
Mr. Rolt's letter puts the position of the deposed directors in 
a clearer light than the Review has seen it hitherto, and for 
the information of our readers we give it below in full: — 

Sir. — The affairs of the Le Roi Mining Company have 
recently been the subject of much bitter discussion, in which, 
as you pointed out in a recent article (December 30th) the real 
issues were entirely lost sight of. But, inasmuch as large sums 
of English money have been invested in this and other mines 
in the Rossland District, a few remarks on the position of affairs 
in that camp may be of interest to many of our readers. 

The two principal English properties in the Rossland camp 
are, as you are aware, the Le Roi and the Le Roi No. 2. A 
comparison of the record of these two companies during the 
past four years shows the following results. During that period 
it must be explained that the Le Roi mine has been worked to 
produce a comparatively large tonnage of low grade ore, while 
Le Roi No. 2 has made small shipments of ore of much higher 
value. The following table gives the results in detail: — 

Le Roi Le Roi No. 2 

Total Gross Value Total Gross Value 

Shipments of Ore Shipments of Ore 

Year Tons -S Tons $ 

1904-5 114,959 12.41 12,337 35.78 

1903-4 160,109 10.94 ( 21,680 24.80 

\ 1,340 10.00 

1902-3 182,669 13.36 17,550 20.69 

1901-2 155,765 11.70 6.3,261 16.89 



During the same period the profit and loss balances are as 
follows: — 

Le Roi Le Roi 2 
Year £ £ 

1904-5 -I- 49,741 + 29,810 

1903-4 — 88,194 + 25,819 

1902-3 + 80,242 + 6,208 

1901-2 — 46,551 -f- 44,986 

Result of four year's working by Le Roi Company 

Loss r. . .■ £ 4,762 

Result of four years' working by Le Roi No. 2 Company 

Profit ■ £106,823 

It is not desirable or necessary to attempt here any com- 
parison of the relative value or merits of the two properties, 
and for the purposes of this argument it will be sufficient to .say 
that the Le Roi mine has generally been, and is still regarded 
as at least the equal of the Le Roi No. 2 property. This much 
being admitted, one is naturally prompted to enquire why the 
results obtained by Le Roi have been so disappointing, while 
those obtained by Le Roi No. 2 have been so satisfactory. 
The explanation is to be found in the fact set forth above, that 
the Le Roi has been worked as a big low-grade property and 
Le Roi No. 2 by means of close hand-sorting, as a small high- 
grade one. The further ((uestion at once arises — Why this 
difference of method? Why has the system that has brought 
success to Le Roi No. 2 not been adopted by Le Roi? The 
explanation again is simy)le. The Le Roi No. 2 Company does 
not own its own smelter, and therefore disposes of its ore to 
the best bidder, after first eliminating ail unprofitable ore by 
close hand-sorting. The Le Roi Company owns its own smelter, 
and during the period under discussion has used it to smelt 
its ores, with the following results. It may be taken for granted 
that no smelter in the Rossland district can be operated with 
anything like reasonable economy upon less than 300 to 3.50 
tons of ore per day. This is a minimum, and as a matter of 
fact the amount has often been greatly exceeded in the Le 
Roi Mining Company's smelter at Northport. In order to ob- 
tain the necessaiy supply of ore the Le Roi Company had to 
rely firstly on the output of its own mine, and, secondly, to a 
much smaller extent, on "customs" ore bought from other 
mmes. The second source of supply has long been recognized 
as most important, and great efforts have been made to de^•elop 
this branch of the industry. But for the very good and suffi- 
cient reason that the operating costs of the Northport smelter 
have always been too high, it has been found impossible to 
compete successfully with other smelters in the district, so 
that the amount of customs ore purchased from other mines 
has always been small, and during the year 1904-5 amovmted 
to less than 10,000 tons. Thus the Company has been thrown 
back upon its own mine, and in order to keep its own smelter 
going has been forced to ship large quantities of ore of less 
than payable grade. Owing to the very serious mistakes in 
sampling which were made during the year 1903-4, and which 
were at the time the subject of much discussion, it is impossible 
to examine the shipments for that year. But an analysis of 
the shipments for the year 1904-5 amply proves the strength of 
the above assertion. During that period the mine shipments 
to the Northport smelter amounted to 114,959 tons, of which 
at least 50,000 tons were of a lower value than the total monthly 
working expenses: that term including cost of mining, depre- 
ciation, office expenses, and direct and indirect smelting charges, 
but excludmg cost of development. In other words, during 
the year ending June 30th, 1905, almost exactly one-half of the 
total shipments of the Le Roi mine resulted in a dead loss to 
the Company, and were made for no other purpose than to supply 
their own smelter with the minimum amount of ore required 
for its operation. In the face of these figures, no other conclusion 
IS possible than that the Le Roi Company should for the future 
follow the policy of the Le Roi No. 2, which would involve much 
more careful sorting, reduction of shipments and increase of 
the average value of its ore. The adoption of this policy neces- 
sarily carries with it the relinquishing of smelting at Northport, 
which it is not amiss to remark was the decision arrived at and 
carried out by the late board of Directors. One further con- 
clusion is to be drawn from the facts and figures given above. 
It is this, that the output at Rossland camp has never at any 
time been sufficient to maintain in full and economical working 
more than one smelter, and that the poor record of the camp 
is due not to the poverty of the mines but to the insane policy 
which has been followed of scattering its output all o^■er the 
country instead of pouring it into one smelter where, because it 
could be treated on a large scale, the greatest possible economies 
could be effected. The consolidation proposals put forward 
by the late Board of Directors would, to a very great extent, 
have attained this result, and were, therefore, from this point 
of view at all events a move in the right direction. 

Yours faithfully, ♦ 
F. \V. ROLT, 

(Late Director Le Roi Mining Co.) 

January 26th, 1906. 



88 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



.IHELrM RIVER HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER INSTAL- 
LATION IN BRITISH INDIA. 



The Goveriinieiit of Hritish India has for some time pursued 
a broad-minded policy in developino- the latent possiliilities of the 
immense and valuable country over which it exercises sovereignty 
and its officials have interested themselves in providiiiK for the 
future welfare and enlightenment of the native inhabitants. 
Among other laudable j^-ojects, which the (iovernment has 
instituted, has been the commissioning of some of the most 
capable Royal P^ngineers to plan for and construct public works, 
such as would aid in the general advancement of the native 
industries and the development of the commerce of the country. 

The first notable project undertaken for the generation and 
distribution of electricity was that of the Cauvery Power Scheme, 
located in Mysore State in Southern India. Work on this plant 
was started in 1900, the initial installation being completed after 
many difficulties in June, 1902. About a year ago, the second 
installation or extension of the plant, consisting of 3610 kilowatts 
generator capacity, was completed. This increased the possible 
output of the entire plant to 7920 kw, making it the largest 
hydro-electric installation now ojierating in Southern Asia, if 
not on the entire continent. 

The chief credit for the com|)letion of the Cauvery Power 
Plant is due to Major A. .1. de I.otbiniere, R.E., Deputy (,'hief 
Engineer of the Government of Mysore, who not only conceived 
the plan of the installation, but successfully arranged for the 
financing of the entire project, overcoming prejudices that woiild 
have deterred a man less sound in his convictions. He after- 
wards arranged for the purchase of the entire electrical and 
hydraulic equipment and supervised its installation. 

The power scheme next to be luidertaken after the Cauvery 
is the Jhelum Power Installation on the Jhelum River in Kashmir, 
in Northwest India. This power plant is to be installed near 
Rampur about 50 miles below Srinager, where a 6-mile conduit 
will give a head of water at the plant of about 400 feet. The 
present plans call for an installation of about 20,000 horse- 
power. 

It is planned to use the power for operating the Kashmir 
section of the Jhelum Valley Railway electrically along its 
entire length of 180 miles. A single-phase system" of traction 
will undoubtedly be installed. Po.ssibly the most important 
immediate use to which the power will be put will be in operating 
dredgers for the purpose of deepening the Jhelum River in the 
Kashmii- Valley, and thus minimizing the floods, which, under 
existing circumstances, periodically devastate the entire country. 
The contemplated plant will also allow of the reclamation of" a 
very large tract of land, and permit of the storage of water in 
Wular Lake above the power plant for sale to the Punjab Irriga- 
tion Department. Another important use of the power will be 
for operating the large silk factory at Srinager and also for supply- 
ing with current the electrical water heaters in the silk mill. 
In addition, the power will be utilized for other industrial pur- 
poses and for lighting in Srinager and in Abbottabad. Murree 
and Rawalpindi, prosperous towns in the British Province of 
Hazara, lying to the west of Kashmir. 

After successfully completing the preliminary arrangement 
for carrying on the important work connected with the Jhelum 
Power Installation, Major de Lotbiniere was instructed last May, 
by the Jammu and Kashmir State Council, acting for the Ma- 
harajah of Jammu and Kashmir, to proceed to Europe and 
America in order to interview the leading hydraulic and elec- 
trical manufacturej-s and to ask those selected to bid upon the 
machinery and materials for the plant. Carrying out these 
instructions, he visited the works of those leading manufac- 
turers on both continents who were considered for the work 
and personally inspected their manufacturing establishments, 
as well as power plants in which their machinery was operat- 
ing. 

As a result of this careful investigation, Major de Lotbiniere, 
who had full powers for the acceptance of the tenders submitted, 
has reconuncnded to his Government that the contracts for the 
entire hydraulic and electrical equipment be placed with firms in 
the United States. The contract for the hydraulic equipment 
was awardcfj to the Abner Doble ('ompany of San Francisco, 
U.S.A., and calls for the hydraulic plant complete from the fore- 
bay to the tailrace, inclufling the intake, valves, pressure pipes, 
pressure-pi [)(• thrust blocks, interior pij)ing, water wheels and 
nox'/Aen, iiydrauli(t governors, and all details nece.ssary for the 
hydraulic e(|ui[)ment. The apparatus and materials are to be 
<lelivered at the Port of Karachi, India. 

Th(^ gravity conduit line for the |)ower phmt will be a|)proxi- 
inately 34,000 feet in length and for th(! upi)er H,r->(){) feet will con- 
sist oi' an ex(\'ivat,<!d ditch lined with masonry. The remaining 
portion of the water channel will consist of a rectangular flume, or 



a wooden stave pipe such as has been installed .so successfully in 
connection with plants of this character on the Pacific (,'oast. 
The flume will have a capacity of over .500 cubic feet per second. 

The forebay at the end of the gravity line and at the head 
of the pressure i)ipes will be constructed of masonry and will 
be provided with special headgates. The sliding elements of the 
intake gates will be of timber, all iron and metal parts necessary 
for the construction of the gates being furnished by the hydraulic 
contractor. 

The pressure lines will consist of riveted steel pipes de- 
signed with a factor of safety of five, each supplying one of the 
hydro-electric units. For each jjipe line a standpipe and two 
special vacuum valves will be provided in order to protect the 
pipe against injury in case the water should be drawn out 
suddenly. 

At the lower end of each pressure line the last length of pipe 
will terminate in a flange which will Ije bolted to a massive cast- 
iron thrust block that will rest on a heavy cast-iron sole plate 
or base. The latter will be mounted on a" substantial masonry 
foundation and held in position by anchor bolts. This fitting 
will be designed to take the entire "hydraulic thrust of the pipe, 
an ample factor of safety being allowed so that under the mo.st 
severe conditions there will l)e no .strain on the branch piping 
in the interior of the power house. Each pressure line will 
consist of a riveted steel pipe vaiying in diameter from 30 to 36 
inches and a 54 to 36-inch taper pipe, 10 feet long, at the upper 
end. The pipes will be 790 feet in length, and will deliver the 
water undei- an effective head of 400 feet. 

The interior piping of the power house will consist of welded 
pipe with welded flanges, all piping and fittings beyond the thrust 
block being designed with a factor of safety of 10 and subjected 
to a test pressure of IJ times the working pressure for a period 
of five hours. 

Twelve main units and three exciter units have been planned 
for the e(iuipment of the power house. Each main unit will con- 
sist of a Doble Tangential Water Wheel with automatic oil- 
jiressure governor delivering 1,765 brake horsepower to the shaft, 
under an effective head of 400 feet. Each wheel will be direct 
connected to a 1,000-kw alternator, the speed of the unit being 
500 revolutions per minute. The exciter units will each consist of 
a Doble Tangential Water Wheel delivering 285 brake horsepower 
to the shaft under an effective head of 400 feet. The speed of 
the exciters will also be 500 revolutions per minute. 

The hydro-electric units will be of the Doble .standard 
two-bearing type, the wheel runner being fastened on the end of 
the shaft. For each of the main units the Doble Company will 
furnish a high-carbon, open-hearth steel forged shaft and two 
bearings of a special ring-oiling type provided with revolvabic 
bearing shells. The exciter water-wheel runners will be mounted 
on the extended ends of the exciter generator shafts. 

The water wheels will be equipped with ellipsoidal buckets' 
needle regulating nozzles and centrifugal water guards. The 
regulation of the main units will be effected by means of hy- 
draulic governors operating jet deflectors. For the exciter uni"ts 
hand regulation will be provided by means of the needle nozzles. 
The gate valves for each wheel will be of special construction 
with outside screw and yoke, bronze-mounted, with by-pass. 

The power house will be of solid masonr\' construction and 
will have a wide veranda as a protection from the tropical sun. 
A double steel roof will be provided and two travelling cranes 
will be installed for handling the machinery. The transformers 
will be installed in a bay of the main buifding or in a separate 
structure. 

The conditions under which the plant will be installed are 
decidedly out of the ordinary as compared with similar work in 
thi.s country. The specifications for the electrical and hydraulic 
equipment stipulated that no single piece of machinery' .should 
weigh more than four tons when packed, for the reason that there 
is 200 miles of road transportation, including a lift over a range 
of mountains 8,000 feet high. Transportation in that section 
of the country is limited to bullock cart, and no single piece of 
machinery heavier than 4 tons can be transported, a total of 5 
tons including the trollie (cart) being the maximum weight that 
can be hauled over the mountains. 

Portland cement costs $7.50 per barrel delivered at the site, 
making its use prohibitive for hea\y concrete work. However, 
there is plenty of natm-al rock in t"he vicinity, so masonry con- 
struction will be used for the walls of the power house a"nd for 
the foundations of machines, intake, forebay, etc. 

The entire hydro-electric installation will be constructed, 
erected, tested and placed in operation under the supervision of 
Major A. J. de Lotbiniere, R.E. Major D. Eraser, R.E., and Capt. 
Thomson, R.E., will act as his engineering representatives in 
London. Mr. A. C. Jewett, formerly of the General Electric 
Company, will serve as installing engineer for the Government 
Mr. Jewett was connected with the installation of the Cauvcrj'' 
plant, and his selection as erecting engineer for the Jhelum 
River installation comes as a well-deserved recognition of his 
ability. — [Ad.] 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



89 



A NOVEL WATERHOIST. 



The question of unwaterino; a mine always is a serious 
problem to the mine manas;ement, especially so when the water 
is highly impregnated with acids. \\'hen the amount liecomes 
excessive the means to be employed for disposing of it taxes 
the ingenuity of all concerned to the uttermost. 

In the anthracite regions there are mines in which for every 
ton of coal raised, as high as 14 tons of water must be pumped, 
and the latter must be done at a minimun of expense. Xowhere, 
probably have a greater variety of pumps and lifting devices 
been tried — and the most satisfactory type, up to date, for 
handling large quantities of water at comparatively low heads, 
have proved to be large bailers operated by steam engines. 
These, however, lack the mechanical regularity inherent in a 
pump, as they are necessarily operated by men, and it remained 
for the Deleware, Lackawanna & Western R.R. Co. and its 
Electrical Engineer, Mr. H. M. Warren, to finally develop a 
water-hoisting equipment which would preserve all the valuable 
points of the steam hoist and at the same time operate auto- 



Weight of bucket=i weight of water, so that weight on 
rope=53,235 lbs. or nearly 27 tons requiring 2" steel rope. 
The various preliminary speed and movement diagrams are laid 
out per accompanying diagram. 

It was decided in carrying out the design that it would be 
impracticable to design the hoist other than have a motor 
nmning continuously in one direction, as it is a well-known fact 
that the amount of current required to accelerate a large motor 
of this type is enormous, and greatly interferes with the proper 
running of the power plant. 

The D.L. & W.R.R. Co., desired to use an A.C. Motor 
directly at the hoist, and as the motor was to run continuously 
in one direction, this necessitated the use of friction clutches for 
accelerating and reversing the load. As The Wellman-Seaver- 
Morgan C'ompany had several smaller plants already in operation 
using A.C. Motors on hoists which are operated similarly to the 
presrtit hoist, and as they are running successfully, and the 
repairs and renewals for clutches had not exceeded that required 
for the other hoisting engines, it was decided to use this method. 

Figs. 1 and 2 show a front and side view of the hoist. As 
will be noticed the general arrangement consists of a motor 




matically. The carrymg out of the mechanical details of the 
hoist and its automatic devices were confided to The ^^^ellman- 
Seaver-Morgan Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, and the successful 
operation of the plant reflects great credit on the latter, as they 
guaranteed the machiney to accomplish the desired results. 
Most of the electrical controlling devices were furnished by the 
Electric Controller & Supply Company, Cleveland, O. In the 
original specifications the D.L. & W.R.R. Co., called for the 
hoist to be operated by an alternating current motor of SOO H.P., 
and the question of starting, stopping and reversing so large a 
motor had, at the outset, to be met. The duty to be performed 
by the hoist, called for the raising of 4,000 gallons of water per 
minute to a height of 550 feet. 

4,000 gals. X 8.27=33,180 lbs. 
550' 2" rope x 6 . 3=3,465 



36,645 lbs. to be raised at 550' per 
minute. 

36,645 X 550 

= 610 net horse power. 

33,000 



driving a pair of bevel wheels through a single bevel pinion. 
The bevel wheels run loose on a shaft and are fitted with the well 
known Webster, Camp & Lane friction clutches. The operating- 
mechanisms for the clutches are so designed that only one 
clutch can be thrown in at a time, but both clutches can be 
out at the same time. Throwing in one clutch runs the drum in 
one direction; throwing in tlie other clutch reverses the motion 
of the drum. 

To the shaft on which the bevel wheels run there is keyed 
a pinion meshing with main gear on the drum shaft. The drums 
are of the cylindroconical type 10' at the small diameter and 
16' at the large diameter. At a hoisting speed of 550' per minute 
the drum makes about 15 RPM. There is one main brake located 
between the drums. All of the clutches and brakes are operated 
by auxiliary air cylinders fitted with oil cushion cylinders, 
the compi-essed air being furnished by a motor dri\'en air com- 
pressor and the necessary tanks located near to the hoist. The 
hoist is controlled by a mechanical device shown in Fig. 2. 
This device consists mainly of a drum rotated by means of a 
friction^ drive from the motor through a sprocket chain. The 
drum shaft transmits its motion to a secondary shaft fitted 




I'lci. :i. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



91 



with variable speed which in turn operates a secondary stop. 
The main hoisting drum shaft operates a travelling nut which 
is so located with respect to the controller drum that at either 
end of its travel it releases a stop and allows the controller drum 
to make a quarter turn; this movement, through suitable elec- 
trical connections, operates the solenoids on the clutch valve, 
releasing the clutch and the solenoid on the brake valve settmg 
the brake, the further movement of the controlling drum bemg 
arrested by the secondary- stop. This stop is released by the 
variable speed shaft and its connections, which has been given 
a predfetermined time movement corresponding to the interval 
for emptying the bucket. The further movement of the con- 
trolling drum releases the brake and throws in the reversmg 
clutch, thus starting the hoist in the opposite direction, and also 
starting the travelling nut on the controlling mechanism m the 
opposite direction. At the end of the hoist the cycle of control- 
ling movements in repeated and so on, making the hoisting 
operation continuous' and automatic. Every attention has 
been given to the safe operation of the hoist. The main brake 
is of the gravity type and to be released the current must be on 
the solenoid operating the valve so that air can be admitted to 
l^e underside of the brake piston. 

If for any reason, either the supply of current or of air 
pressure is interrupted, the valve drops, and the weights on brake 
lever set the brake. The clutches are designed so that they are 
thrown out by weights. As is the case with the brake, either 
clutch can only be thrown in when the current is on the solenoid, 
and the air pressure admitted under the piston, and if either 
current or pressure fail, the clutch is off. The motor shaft is 
fitted with an emergency brake operated by a weight controlled 
by a solenoid — any interruption in the flow of current to the 
motor sets the brake and stops the motor. Any interruption 
of the flow of the current stops the machine, throws out the 




Fig. 4. 

clutches and puts on the brake. A safety cut-out is provided 
for in the head frame so that in case a bucket is carried beyond 
the" proper height, the current is cut off. Fig. 3 shows the head 
frame. The head frame is 93' from the base to the centre of 
the sheave at the top. It is built of structural steel, roughly 
inTthe shape of an "A". From the head frame are suspended 
two buckets 6' in diameter and 19' 6" deep. The capacity of 
each bucket is 17 tons of water. In the bottom of the bucket are 
located two lift gates with an area practically equal to the cross 
section of the bucket. These gates are lifted automatically 
when the bucket reaches the top, and the water is discharged 
through the bottom into a spout fitted below the bucket, and 
which deflects it to either side of the shaft. Each bucket makes 
a complete round-trip in one minute and fifty seconds, the total 
lift being 555 feet. 

Fis. 4 shows a nearer view of the bucket when discharging. 

-[Ad.] 



GIGANTIC TESTING MACHINE. 

Messrs. W. & T. Avery Limited of the Soho Foundiy, Bir- 
mingham have now under construction for the Engineering 
Section of the Birmingham University a huge machine for test- 
ing whole members of constructional work, such as complete 
Girders, Columns, Roof Principals, and every part in the cons- 
truction of Bridges, Roofs and Machinery, in fact, the Machine 
will test any and every part that can possibly be used m En- 
gineering Work. ' . ' 

The Machine is designed to test specimens for Tension, 
Compression and Transversely. The maximum capacity is 



300 tons, the total length 70-ft. and the weight of the metal 
in the Machine is about 85-tons. 

The strain is applied by an Hydraulic Cylinder & Rani and 
is arranged to test speciment in tension up to 25-ft., in Com- 
pression up to 30-ft., and Transversely up to 20-ft. in length. 

The Machine is one of the largest Testing Machines that 
has ever been made, and is specially comprehensive in order to 
give a wide range of Tests, It is so arranged that an official 
can govern, from one position, the HydrauHc Power applying 
the strain, and the Recording Steelyard. 

The Machine will be a great acquisition to the University. 



A CLOSE VIEW OF THE WALKING 
DELEGATE. 



What he does and how he does it described 
in the Coal-Mine workers. 



A rather unusual view of the work of the " walking delegate " 
is presented by Frank Julian Warne in his book, "The Coal- 
mine Workers?' just published by Longmans, Green, & Co. 
Dr. Warne says: 

Nearly all the members of the executive board of the United 
Mine Workers of America are employed by the president of 
that organization as national organizers. As such they receive 
$4.00 a dav and expenses. These are the "walking delegates . 
They bear^he brunt of the fight, are always to be found in the 
thickest of it, and generally constitute the advance guard of the 
field force of the "organization when an invasion of territory 
heretofore unorganized is decided upon. 

They are the missionaries of the new doctrine as to the 
rights of man; thev usually are compelled to blaze it forth to 
their kind in a wifderne.ss of conflicting passions and class and 
race hatreds; they are met with suspicion and bitter antagonism 
even from those they would save from industrial servitude. 
These organizers are of many tongues; they go among strange 
peoples from many climes. They teach their doctrine of 
unionism alike to the negro, the Slav, the Lithuanian, the 
Greek, the German, the Englishman, and the American. 
Through months and even years of bitter antagonism, of almost 
crushing opposition, they work patiently at their task to bring 
the many nationalities engaged in coal mining into the organiza- 
tion, and to mould the heterogeneous mass into unity of belief 
and action. Fearless and undaunted by opposition, they bear 
persecution and suffer imprisonment and even death for the 
faith that is in them. 

However far apart one's views may be from an endorsement 
of the means and methods employed by these organizers, if he 
could but see the spirit of martyrdom often exhibited by them 
he would beUeve, as the writer does, that they are performing a 
real and lasting work as pioneers in the formation of our indus- 
trial state. 

In 1904 over sixty, and in 1905 more than sixty-five, or- 
ganizers and field workers were employed by the national uinon 
in addition to the members of the executive board, making 
what is probabley the largest paid force of organizers of any 
labor union in the world. 

These organizers, going into coal fields whose mine workers 
are outside the national union, begin their task by getting into 
personal touch with the men. They stop them on the street 
corners, visit the places in which they are in the habit of congre- 
gating, distribute among them tracts containing information 
about the organization, and in various other ways plant the 
idea of unionism in the minds of a few of the men. From these 
few it spreads, at first almost unobservable, until gradually the 
workers begin talldng about "the union", and by degrees near- 
lyaH the employees of the mine, or, where the mines are m close 
proximity, the employees of a number of mines, are discussing 
the objects and benefits of organization. 

When he thinks the time opportune, the organizer calls a 
meeting of those he believes interested in the movement and 
organizes them into a local union, sometimes secretely for fear 
of the opposition of the employers. They secure a charter 
and other supplies from the national headquarters for $15.00, 
and are assigned a number by which the local is to be officially 
known. In cases the jurisdiction of the local may extend to 
two or more coUieries or mines, but as a rule it is confined to 
the employees of a single mine. Where a mining plant em- 
ploys several thousand men they may be organized into a num- 
ber of locals according either to nationality, or language, or 
place of residence in case they are scattered in near-by mining 
towns. 



92 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



ELECTRIC MINE LOCOMOTIVES. 



For the rapid and economical production 
of coal, probably nothinf; has been of greater 
service than the introduction of the elec- 
trical mine locomotives. The Jeffrey Mfg' 
Co. of Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.. who are pio- 
neers and leaders in the maiuifacture of coal 
mining and coal handling machinery, early 
conceived of the desirability of using electric 
locomotives for coal haulage in mines. 

Since their first locomotive was put into 
service in 1889 (and it is interesting to note 
that this locomotive is still in active opera- 
tion) the Jeffrey Mfg. Co. have been con- 
tinually developing improvements and differ- 
ent types to meet various conditions of 
mine service. 

The illustrations show a number of the 
Jeffrey Electric Locomotives in operation. 
Among their more recent types are the com- 
bined rack rail and friction traction loco- 
motives shown in figures 1 and 2. These 
locomotives are provided with .sprockets for 
propelling the locomotive up steep grades, 
where friction traction alone would be in- 
adequate. 

A perforated steel plate of proper strength 
and wearing qualities forms the rack in 
which the sprockets run. The locomotives 
shown in figures 1 and 2 are arranged so that 
they may be propelled either by plain friction 
traction or by the sprockets in the rack. 
The economy of such a combination is self 
evident. It is necessary to provide the rack 
rail only on grades where the locomotive is 
unable to perform its duties through friction 
traction alone. 

The locomotive shown iu figure 2 is 
designed for hea^'y duty where it is necessary 
to retard or to haul trains on steep grades. 
Each unit is provided with two sprockets, 
one on either axle, so that the double unit 
has a total of four sprockets to act in the 
rack. In actual test, the locomotive shown 
in figure 1 has hauled a train up a 10% 
grade, which required an effort on the rack 
of 22,000 lbs. The motors were not severely 
taxed in this dujy. 

Figures 3, 4 and 5 are views of Jeffrey 
standard electric mine in locomotives. Fig- 
ures 6, 7 and 8 show Jeffrey electric gather- 
ing locomotive in operation The feature 
of Jeffrey electric gathering locomotives which 
distinguishes them from other types of mine 
locomotives, lies in their ability to operate 
in mine rooms and on side tracks at a dis- 
tance from the trolley wires. When so oper- 
ating, the locomotive is arranged to take 
current through flexible insulated conduc- 
tors. This flexible cable is wound on a drum 
carried by the locomotive. When it is desired 
to leave the main tracks, the end of the 
cable is connected to the trolley wire, the 
trolley pole is lowered and the locomotive is 
operated by current through the cable. 

As the locomotive runs away from the 
trolley wire, the cable is automatically paid 
out and as the locomotive returns again 
towards the trolley wire, the cable is auto- 
matically wound up with uniform tension and 
in even layers. This type of locomotive 
which has been introduced by the Jeffrey 
Mfg. Co. is proving very successful and is 
rapidly replacing mules and horses in mines. 

Many of the largest operating Companies 
in the United States to day are adopting 
electric gathering and haulage locomotives, 
to the entire exclusion of animal haulage. 

The Jeffrey Mfg. Co. manufacture a great 
variety of sizes and styles of electric mine 
locomotives to suit the various conditions 
met with in mine service: they are prepared 
to fill order from standard patterns for loco- 
motives weighing from 2^ to 40 tons. Their 




Fig. 1. 





Fig 2. 




Fig. -.i. 




Fig. 6. 



94 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



experience has been so extensive that hardly 
any conditions can be presented which they 
are not able to meet, with standard apparatus. 

The] electrical equipment employed in 
Jeffrey locomotives is of a higher class than 
is furnished in any other form of electric 
traction work, 

As the conditions under which mine loco- 
motives have to operate are very severe, the 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co. have provided exceptional 
capacity and superior methods of construc- 
tion and ^ insulation, which [their experience 
has skilled them to produce. The manufac- 
turers of street railway apparatus do not 
provide such equipments, as their operating 
conditions are much less severe 'and their 
experience has not skilled them in the vital 
points necessary to'successfully meet mining 
conditions. 
[Ad.] 




AMENDMENT OF YUKON LAWS. 

At the forthcoming session of parliament the Governor of 
the Yukon, the Hon. W. W. B. Mclnnis, will present to Governor- 
in-Council the suggestions of the Commission to which was 
entrusted the matter of needed changes in the mining laws of 
the Yukon. So far as can be learned the principal new features 
are as follows: — ■ 

All big tracts of ground for extensive operation must be 
acquired by grouping ordinary claims. No more concessions 
are to be granted. 

Miners' licenses are abolished. The size of claims, manner 
of staking and surveying remain as they have been for some 
time. ■•^ I • 

Disputes over distributions of water, boundaries, dumping 
ground, encroachments and such like shall he referred to an ar- 
bitration board to be appointed by the gold commissioner or 
recorder. Judgments shall be final except on points of law. 
No appeal on the interpretation of the whole code is to be above 
the Yukon courts. 

To encourage prospectors, one man may take five powers 
of attorney on filing record that that number of mea grub-staked 
him. Distant prospectors can obtain the privilege of filing 
record .six months after staking. 

An owner may abandon his claim on any creek at any time 
by giving notice to the recorder, and locate elsewhere on the 
same creek. If he sells, he cannot locate on the same creek for 
a year. 

Leases of ground may be obtained for one to five years. 
The fees are to be $10 for one year and $70 for five years. 

Two hundred dollars' worth of work must be done an- 
nually on each claim on the valuation fixed by the gold commis- 
sioner; failure to do the as.sessment work means absolute for- 
feiture at the end of the year. 

All owners in the claim shall do representative work ac- 
cording to the share owned. Failure means that the ground 
lapses to the other partners. 

See page water belongs to the claim where it originated. 



COAL NOTES. 



NOVA SCOTIA. 

From reports current at Glace Bay it is believed that the 
Cape Breton Coal, Iron & Railway Company have purchased 
the areas owned by the Cumberland Coal Company in that 
vicinity. This area is a very large one, approaching about 20 
square miles, and if the report is confirmed the company have 
very much increased the resources of their Broughton property. 

Under date of Feb. 28th, we are advised that the Intercolo- 
nial Railway has given a contract to the Port Hood Coal Com- 
pany for deliveries of coal during the coming season. Dr. 
McJjennan, the member for the county, has made an applica- 
tion to Parliament for a grant of $20,000.00 to continue the 
work on Port Hood harbour. It is also stated that satisfactory 
arrangements have been completed by which the additional 



Fig. 8. 

capital required will be subscribed at once, and that develop- 
ment of the collieries will be proceeded with immediately. 



The machine shops of the Dominion Coal Company have 
been kept busy during February in repair work on machinery 
in preparation for the coming season. Several of the locomotives 
have been overhauled and the general up-keen of the various 
machines is being closely attended to. 

It is rumoured that the general-store business of the Domin- 
ion Coal Company will shortly be abolished. As the result of 
an examination into the matter of the Company's stores made 
by Mr. W. H. Kelson it is reported that orders which had been 
placed before his arrival have been countermanded or cancelled. 
These rumours are not confirmed by the Company, who are re- 
ticent upon the subject, l)ut the procedure which is being followed 
is sufficient to justify the belief that if the business is not entirely 
discontinued in the future it will be very much curtailed. 

The Cape Breton papers announce that the various iron ore 
properties in the neighborhood of Whycocomagh have been 
merged into one company, which has taken the name of the 
Canadian Iron & Steel Company. Who are behind the enter- 
prise has not yet transpired, although the announcement is 
made that a very considerable sum will be at once expended in 
development. The result of the test pits which have recently 
been sunk upon the different areas has shown fairly good quan- 
tities of exceptionally high grade, magnetites, hematites and 
specular ores. Many samples have carried from 6.5 to 66 per 
cent, of metallic iron. The bands of ore are all favourably 
situated within a mile to two miles of an excellent harbour, 
where 24 feet of water is obtainable the year round, and which 
is also open for eight months of the year. Some of the deposits 
are also within one or two miles of a line of road which has been 
surveyed from Orangedale to St. Rose. The authority for these 
statements is the Inverness News. 

With the beginning of this month Colliery No. 3 of the 
Dominion Coal Company went on double sihff; the reserve 
colliery is also double shifted and rumours at Glace Bay are to 
the effect that two other collieries will work a double shift in a 
short time. 

The steamer "Hawkins" has been carrying coal all winter 
between Morien and Maine points. 

The new colliery to be opened by the Nova Scotia Steel & 
Coal Company will be called " Sydney No. 4," and will be opened 
on the outcrop of the old Sydney main seam, in what is known as 
the Bras d'Or district. It will be about H miles distant from 
Colliery No. 3. The slope is to be driven across the dip instead 
of on the full dip of the seam, and is to have a grade of about 2 
to 3 per cent. The levels will be driven from the slant at about 
the same percentage of grade, but the rooms will be broken off 
from the levels practically on the plane of the coal. In this 
way grades will be overcome in all the workings. The haulage 
is to be entirely electric; an electric locomotive of about 6 tons 
weight will bring the coal from the rooms to the levels and an 
18 ton electric locomotive will bring (.rains, of from 40 to 60 mine 
cars, to the surface! where, without transfer, the cars will be 
taken direct to the tipples at No. 3. There are to be no bank- 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



95 



head engines, nor plant at the slope mouth of the colliery. 
Mining is to be done by a chain cutter driven by electricity and 
the mine will be worked on the room and pillar plan for the first 
three lifts, owing to the slackness of the cover, but below the 
third lift it will be worked on the long wall principle. The sur- 
plus gases from the blast furnace and the coke ovens will generate 
the power for the machines at the new collier\% and the electricity 
will be carried to No. 4 by way of collierj- No. 3, where a portion 
of the power will be diverted to run ventilating and screening 
apparatus. The generating plant is to consist of two 500 K.W. 
direct connected generators, with a sub-station at No. 4 to reduce 
the voltage from 6600 to 220 volts. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. is appealing the assessment 
recently imposed on it of $790,000 for 64,000 acres of coal lands 
and also against the assessment of 163,000 acres of wild land at 
$1 an acre. The former will bear a tax of 1 per cent., or $79,000 
per annum, while the wild land will bear a tax of 4 per cent., or 
$6,557.75, making in all $14,457.75. 



A recent test of coal from the mines of the Crow's Nest 
Pass Coal Company, made by the engineers of the Northern 
Pacific railway, has proven highly satisfactory and has estab- 
lished beyond doubt the excellent qualities of Crow's Nest 
coal. The trial was made on a run between I;ivingstone and 
Billings, Montana, at which R. W. Coulthard, general sales 
agent of the coal company, was present. iStatements made by 
Mr. Coulthard to the Femie Free Press are to the effect [that 
former tests had been made of western coals but that this one 
made of the Crow's Nest Pass coal was much superior to any 
others, especially in respect of its efficiency for steaming pur- 
poses. 



COMPANY MEETINGS AND REPORTS. 

The Crow's Nest P.\ss Co.\l Co. Annual Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. was held 
in Toronto on February 9th, with the Hon. Geo. H. Cox, president, 
in the chair. 

The ninth annual report of the directors showed that the 
net earnings of the year had amounted to $497,898.68. 

The Reserve Fund has reached the figure of $1,800,000.00. 
The general statement was as follows: — ■ 

General Statement, 31st December, 1905. 



assets. 

Mines, real estate, plant, development, etc $5,374,644 . 89 

Securities owned 328,296 . 98 

Accounts receivable 616,803.27 

Cash on hand and in bank 13,772.98 



$6,333,518.12 



liabilities. 

Capital stock, paid up $3,500,000 . 00 

Bills payable 367,769 . 96 

Accounts payable 226,447 . 09 

Dividend No. 20, payable Jan. 1, 1906 87,500 . 00 

Reserve fund 1,800,000.00 

Profit and loss 351,801.07 



$6,333,518.12 



PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT. 

For year ending 31st December, 1905. 

Balance at credit, Dec. 31, '04 $203,320.44 

Net profits for 1905 497,898 . 68 

Premium received on calls paid on new stoclc 35,400 . 00 



$736,619 . 12 



Appropriated as foUows: — 

Dividends paid -. $349,418.05 

Transferred to reserve fund 35,400 . 00 

Balance carried forward to 1906 351,801 . 07 



$736,619.12 



Directors elected were: Hon. G. A. Cox, Robert Jaffray, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir H. M. Pellatt, William Fernie, J. D. 
Chipman, E. R. Wood, David Morrice, Thomas Walmsley, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Mason, Frederic Nichols, G. G. S. Lindsey, 
K.C., C.C. Dalton and James W. Woods. 



At a subsequent meeting of the directors the following 
officers of the company were re-elected for the ensuing year: — 

President, Hon. Geo. A. Cox; 1st vice-president, Robert 
Jaffray; 2nd vice-president and general manager, G. G. S. 
Lindsey; treasurer, E. R. Wood. 

The production of the company since its inception is shown 
in the table below: — 



Tons Coal. Tons Coke. 

1898 8,986 361 

1899 116,200 29,658 

1900 220,458 73,496 

1901 425,457 125,085 

1902 441,236 120,777 

1903 661,118 167,739 

1904 742,210 245,118 

1905 831,249 257,702 



Imperial Development Syndicate.— The Annual general 
meeting of the Imperial Development Syndicate was held in 
Nelson on the 13th of February, when the following report was 
submitted by Mr. A. H. Gracey, the manager of the Syndicate:— 

During 1905 and up to the end of January of this year, 
development to the extent of 1,200 feet has been added to the 
previous work. During the same period, Jan. 1, 1905, to Jan. 
31, 1906, 12,300 tons of ore have been mined, the largest portion 
of which was produced from development work. 

The following summarj^ will .show the results: — Bullion 
produced, $45,184.66; per ton, $3.66J; concentrates, estimated, 
$7,150.00; per ton, 58^ cents; total bullion, $52,234.66; total 
value per ton, $4.25. The gross value of the ore has averaged 
about $5 per ton. 

The cost of this work, including tjje development, mining, 
serial tramming, milling, maintenance, management and general 
expenses at Camborne, not including the 2 per cent, tax, was 
$3.94 per ton. 

The following figures, being a summary of the whole pro- 
duction since the mill was installed, will also be of interest: — 
Tons milled, 20,000; bullion produced, $94,108.27; concentrates, 
estimated, $8,715.00; total, $102,823.27, or an average of $5.15 
per ton. 

Power drill equipment and larger milling capacity are now 
essential to reduce costs and place the property on a proper 
profit earning basis. It is estimated that costs can be thus re- 
duced to $2 or even less per ton, which would leave a nice margin 
or profit on the grade of our ore bodies. Large quantities of this 
ore exist as is thoroughly proven by the past work, and every- 
thing indicates that future work will continue to add to these 
reserves. 



MINING INTELLIGENCE. 



ONTARIO. 

The Atikokan Iron Co., of Port Arthur, is installing two ^5 
kilowatt direct connected units, consisting of Robb-Armstrong 
engines and Westinghouse generators. 

A rich discovery of copper ore is reported to have been 
made on the Soo branch of the C.P.R. in the neighborhood of 
Dean Lake Station. 

The work of opening the Hutton Township iron properties 
is to be commenced shortly, and the operations wiU be in charge 
of Mr. Norman L. Leach of Duluth, who wiU first erect the ne- 
cessary buildings and will then proceed to develop the mine. 



A telegram from Dr. Eugene Haanel, Superintendent of 
Mines, to the Hon. Frank Oliver, Minister of the Interior, dated 
the 24th of February, reads as follows: — 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., 

February 24th. 

Hon. Frank Oliver, M. P., Ottawa, Ont.: 

" Successful demonstration of aU points stated in my memo- 
randum on electric smelting of Canadian iron ores requiring in- 
vestigation. Output greater than the figure adopted by Har- 
bord in report of Commission. Successful smelting of magne- 
tite and desulphurization of pig. Successful substitution of 
charcoal, and therefore of peat coke, for coke. Consumption 
of electrode, insignificant. Production of nicklepig of fine 
quality from roasted pyrrhotite. Forty tons of pig have so far 
been produced. Process admits of immediate commercial ap- 
plication. Experiments will be completed in about two weeks." 

(Sgd.) EUGENE HAANEL, 

Supt. of Mines. 

The wording of this telegram leaves a considerable amount 
of information yet to be given, before commercial value for the 
process is established. 



96 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



E. T. Corkill, Inspector of Mines for Ontario, is niakinu; 
an inspection of the mines in the .Northwestern part of the pfo- 
vince. 

The Antoiiie mica property at Devil Lake has been sold 
by .Mr. W. J. Webster to Messrs. J. M. Stoness of Westport and 
to Kent Bros, of Kingston, who are to open up the property in 
the coming spring. 

The Minto property has recently Ijeen examined by a Mr. 
Reed, a mining engineer of London, who has given a very favor- 
able report upon ' the property. Mr. Reed reports that the 
average of his samples showed from $40.00 to .1.50.00 j er ton 
in gold. Mr. Reed was accompanied to the property by its 
manager, Mr. H. T. Thorle. 

The Temiscamingue Mining Company, I imited, has been 
authorised to increase its capital from |1(')(),000 to $.500,000 by 
the issue of 400,000 shares of new stock of one dollar each. The 
Jubilee Mining, Limited has been authorized to make a similar 
increa.se from .$.500,000 to $.3,000,000 by the issue of 2, .500, 000 
shares of new stock of one dollar each. 

The edition of .5000 copies of the second part of the annual 
report of the Bureau of Mines for Ontario, containing an acc ount 
of the Cobalt ores, is exhausted and 10,000 more will have to be 
printed to meet the demand. 

There have been rumours for some time that the Canada 
Chemical Company is about to erect works in Central Ontario, 
probably at Tweed, for the manufacture of nitric and sulphuric 
acid, and other chemicals, using the sulphur from ores in the 
vicinity, which now goes to waste. Imported sulphur lias 
hitherto been used in Canada for making acids. 

The Welch gold property on islands near Fort Frances has 
shown some very valuable samples of free gold ore, the a.ssa3-s 
running as high as $50. a ton. Some Winnipeg capital is interest- 
ed in the porperty, which will be developed as soon as snow 
leaves. It is the intention to sink the shaft and to ol)tain the 
power from the electrical installation at Fort FVances. 

Dispatches emanating from Ottawa report that the ex- 
periments conducted at the Soo by Dr. Heroult, in the line of 
smelting iron ore by electricity, have shown cost not to exceed 
$10.00 per ton. We regret that the officials in charge have 
decided to give out no information until the Canadian Govern- 
ment's report is jjublished, but until this report makes its ap- 
pearance, such figures as to cost will not be very seriously 
entertained by our iron masters. 

The old Hoepfner nickel smelting plant, at Hamilton, On- 
tario, has been purchased by a syndicate of mine owners in 
Coleman Township, whose purpose it is to remodel the plant 
for the purpose of treating successfully the ores from the Cobalt 
district. The chief movers in the matter are Messrs. W.f!. 
Trethewey, of the Trethewey Mine, and John McMartin, of the 
La Rose mine. It is stated" that the city Council of Hamilton 
have given the Company a .satisfactory rating for a.sse.ssments, 
and work is to be commenced immediately. 

The Bruce Mines in the .\lgotna District have again been 
re-organized and the name of the new corporation is "The 
C(^3per Mining and Smelting Co. of Ontario, Ltd." The capital 
is one million dollars of which sixty thousand shares are offered 
at par. The property including plant, buildings etc.. is trans- 
ferred for one himdred and tv\enty thousand fully paid shares 
of the Company. 

Difficulty is being experienced by the Sudbury, Copper 
Cliff and Creighton Electric Railway in making suitable arrange- 
ments with the council of the town of Copper Cliff for a right of 
way through that town. The promoter of the road, J. R. 
(iordon, made application to the Railway Committee of the 
Ontario Government for a permissive order to operate over a 
portion of the public highway, and to expropriate private pro- 
perty. The matter came before the Committee on the 13th of 
February, Major Gordon being represented by Mr. J. M. Clark, 
K. C, the town of Copper Cliff by Mr. D. L. McCarthy, and the 
Canadian Copper Co. by Mr. H. E. Rose. The hearing may 
be taken to have been adverse to the project, inasnmch as the 
Committee exjjressed the feeling that the Co. could not be given 
the right to run over the highway if the tf)wn council objected. 
The matter is at present hanging fire. 

The Northern Ontario (Jopper Company, Limited, a new 
organization with a (!a[)ital of $-500,000.00, has acquired tko 
recent discovery of copper on the Leziert property in Dean Lahe' 
At the present time the development is limited, consisting only 
of a shaft 20 feet deep, which however shows a vein of 9 feet in 
width, carrying yellow sulphide of cop]ier of an usually high 
grade. The officers of the company an; chiefily from the town 
of SauU, St(:. Marie, th(^ [jresident being Dr. Jl H. Gimby and 
Uriah McFadden, secr(^(ary-( reasurin-. It is the intention of 
the corporation to sink and cross cut on the d(!posits, th.) pre- 
.sent shaft not showing the boundaries of the vein. With suc- 
cessful d(?velopment the company propos<-s to smelt its own 
ore, but the ore taken out during developnicnl will probably 
be sent to the copper smellers turar Sudbury. 



The i)aragraphs wiiich have appeared profusely in the gen- 
eral press of Eastern (.'aiiada, to the effect that the Laureritian 
property contained a vein of solid gold three inches thick are, 
of course, manifestly false. A small vein of the Laurentian 
Mine has yielded remarkable rich samples, and hand specimens 
have contained fully one-half, if not more, of their weight in 
gold. If several tons of such ore could be collected and milled, 
undoubtedly they would produce at the rate of $.S00,()00.00 to 
the ton, but this rich streak does not carry to such distances, 
dther in denth or length, to justify reports which have been 
given out. .Nevertheless, in spite of these exaggerated paragra- 
giaphs, our, information is to the effect that several promising 
discoveries and develojjments have tjeen made, especially in 
the Manitou district, which, if carefully followed and wisely 
administrated, may resuscitate the present moribund condition 
of Ontario's gold mining industry. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

(SfKCIAI, COHRKKFO.N'DKNrK). 

The shioments f)f ore from the Kootenay-Yale district, 
of British Columbia have been far beyond the average. If the 
lead portion of those districts keeps up the rate at which it has 
started it is likely that the output for this year will be from .50 
to 100 per cent, larger than has ever been the case before. While 
this is the prost)ect before the Slocan and East Kootenay, Ross- 
land is also doing fairly well and is also likely to be far in advance 
of the record of the past year. Boundary is going ahead even 
more rapidly and the total output for lOOfi is already estimated 
as being likely to exceed 1,. 500, 000. 

A most important development has recently taken place 
with regard to the smelting of lead ores, especially those ore 
in which occur large percentages of sulphur, i.e., the invention 
of a new double furnace which was lately tried at the new works 
which are now in progress at the old Pilot Bay smelter on Koot- 
enay lake. The principle of the furnace, of which a more de- 
tailed account will be forwarded at a later date when a new plant 
has been blown in definitely, is that the ore is introduced into 
one side of the furnace with coal instead of coke. This stack is 
closed at the top, and communicates with the other, which is 
alongside, the bottoms of both being placed over a large crucible. 
In the second furnace is put no fuel whatsoever; the ignited 
gases coming from the combustion in the first stack are declared 
to be sufficient to smelt the ore in the second, which is open at 
the top just as is any ordinary blast furnace. A detail in the 
con.struction, which is of some importance, is that the tuyeres 
are arranged in a double and not a single set, and are placed 
towards the middle of the furnace rather than close to the 
bottom. 

The point of the matter is that the fuel used is coal not coke 
thereby making a sa\'ing of much importance, as the amount of 
coal is only from 1 to i of the amount of coke used. An experi- 
ment has been tried in a furnace of 40 tons capacitj' and the 
ore used was Blue Bell, which contains 25 to 30 per cent, of 
sulphur. The ore is fed to the furnace raw, that is there is no 
expenditure of fuel necessary for desulphurization. This is 
another big saving in reduction expenses. The Blue Bell mine 
has long been known to contain large quantities of ore but it 
was of low grade and moreover was much mixed with zinc, 
hence the mine had little commercial value. Under the new 
conditions the Blue Bell is likely to become one of the most 
important shippers in Ainsworth camp. A furnace of 120 tons 
capacity is in course of erection and the necessary machinery 
has been ordered from Eastern Canada. It is expected that the 
blowing in of the plant will be attempted early in March. 

At the Hall Mines and the Trail smelters there are extensive 
alterations in progr\?ss, running well into five figures as to cost, 
for the purpose of installing desulphurizations plants of the 
Huntington -Heberlein type. It must be understood that 
while some of the ores of these districts are heavily impregnated 
with sulphur, and therefoi-e probably highly suitable for the 
new double furnace just noted, others are poor in that ingredient 
but yet contain sufficient to make its elimination a matter of 
moment in the reduction of the ore. Hence there is room for 
both the Huntington-Heberlein and for the new "Blanchard" 
furnace, as the double furnace is called from the name of its in- 
ventor. 

The trouble of the Boundary, lack of power, has apparently 
been overcome by the entry into that country of the West 
Kootenay Power company which is installing a 50,000 horse 
power generating electric power plant at Bonnington Falls on 
the Kootenay ri\ er just below Nelson. The Granby will now 
be able to work all of its eight furnace and the B. C. Copper 
and Dominion C()|)per smelters will also be enabled to go ahead 
with the installation of additional furnaces. One thing that 
is still trouliling the Boundary people is the freight charges. 
However, this is now in the hands of the railway officials, and, 
as th(>re seems likely to be at least two competing transporta- 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



97 



tion companies in the Yale district, the freight charges will 
probably come down in the near future. 

In Rossland it is understood that the new director, Mr. 
Anthony J. McMillan, will arrive towards the middle of next 
month and that he purposes to restart the smelter at Xorth- 
port. It may be noted, by those who have been reading the 
weekly mining reports which [are issued for the whole dis- 
trict by the Nelson Daily News, that the shipments for the I^e 
Roi mine are much lower than they used to be. They fall 
below the 2,000 ton mark, whereas the capacity of the machineiy 
and shaft was designed for an output of 5,000 tons by Bernard 
Macdonald. The capacity of the mine is not less todaj^, espe- 
cially with the low rates on ore now pre\'ailing for treatment. 
Whether this has or has not any significance with reference to 
the Trail smelter is for the onlooker to judge. Anyway there 
seems to be trouble in the air. The War-Eagle-Centre Star 
mine has greatly improved by the finding of a portion of the ore 
body in the lower levels in the former mine, and in the Josie 
and Le Roi No. 2, ore has also been found in gratifying quan- 
tities at depth. On the whole the outlook for the Rossland 
mines is good, despite the fact that the recent changes in the 
Le Roi management may breed trouble. It is possible that the 
recent fright that the people of Washington, especially of North- 
port, have experienced in the closing of the large reduction 
works may lead to a better frame of mind and to a cessation of 
the constant efforts to regard the English owned works as a sort 
of milch cow. It is to this that the expenses of the Northport 
smelter are largely to be attributed. If this, however, does 
not cease the present Le Roi management will have to adopt a 
policy of bringing their plant over the bomidarv' line, whether 
they like it or not, or, in default of shipping to the Trail plant. 

The mines of Rossland have been badly treated in public 
estimation. The total value of the ore raised since the be- 
ginning of the camp is upwards of $35,000,000, the returns to 
the shareholders have been inadequate. The cost of treatment 
has been all the way from $16 a ton downwards till today it is 
$3. Had the lower rate been possible, at the outset, Rossland 
camp would have been one of the largest dividend payers in the 
whole of the interior, perhaps on the continent. However, with 
the rate as it is, there lie huge profits before these mines if 
properly handled. 

The total amount of the lead bountv distributed in 1905 
was $334,224.00. 

The record of shipments from the boundary countrj' for 
the present year is at the rate of more than a million and a 
quarter tons per annum. 

The Patlifinder mine, which is a gold-copper proposition 
some twelve miles from Grand Forks, has been bonded to the 
Granby Company for a period of 18 months, and for the sum 
of $110,000.00, to be paid in monthly instalments until the full 
payment has been completed. 

During the five years ending with the 31st of December 
1905 the Granby Consolidated Company mined and smelted 
over 2,118,930 tons of ore. This company, which was originally 
entirely Canadian, now has le.ss than 50,000 of its shares owned 
in Canada. The total issued capital is 1,3.50,000 shares. 

The Never Slip claim, recently located by Joseph Simpson, 
contains a ledge of white quartz 12 feet in width, which carries 
free gold, visible to the naked eye. Report, says that this ledge 
was found by Mr. Simpson when hunting. The qiiartz appears 
to be a pie-milling one, being similar in character to the Cari- 
boo Camp McKinney. A small stamp mill is to be supplied to 
the property during the coming summer. 

That concentration has become quite a factor in the prac- 
tice of British Columbia is shown by the fact that there are at 
present 15 concentrating mills in the Slocan district alone. The 
most of these mills were introduced with the object of making 
the zinc contents of the Slocan lead ores available for market. 
The probable cost of these 15 mills is in the neighbourhood of 
half a million dollars, and our esteemed contemporary, the 
Sandon Mining Standard, makes a good point in stating its 
belief that one good custom mill, centrally located, would 
better have served the interests of the whole Slocan. 

The report of the B. C. Copper Company, Ltd., submitted 
at the annual meeting in New York last month, ended with the 
financial year closing Nov. 30th., and showed net profits for the 
year of $102,907.00; the surplus to the credit of profit and loss 
account was $191,828.00. In speaking to the report President 
Underwood said, that against the profits there had been charged 
large sums for extensive developments which had been made 
to prepare for a very such increased output. These develop- 
ments had disclosed bodies of ore of higher grade than those 
previously worked. The machinery for the new smelting plant 
has been contracted for, and deliveries of the same will begin 
during March; complete installation is expected to be finished 
during the summer. The new plant is to have a capacity of 
50,000 tons per month, as against the present capacity of 18,- 
000 tons. A full electrical equipment is to be provided for 



both the mine and smelter. 37,500 shares of treasury stock 
were sold during the year, the proceeds of which have been 
entirely devoted to development, acquisition of new proper- 
ties and plant. 



NOVA SCOTIA. 

The Little Bay Copper Mine in Newfoundland has a pros- 
pect of again being opened up; Mr. C. F. Taylor is at present in 
charge of the work. 

The Mic Mac mine, in the Leipsigate Ciold District near 
Bridgewater, N. S., has been sold to New York people who 
have incorporated under the title of the Mic Mac Gold Mining 
Company, with a capital of $1,500,000.00 di\ided into three 
hundred thousand shares of $5.00 each. The corporation is 
under the laws of the State of Maine. 

The annual meeting of the Nova Scotia Oil & Gas Company 
was held in Halifax during February. The new bore hole has 
reached a depth of 1020 feet and is about one mile to the north- 
west of the old bore hole. It will be remembered that this cor- 
poration has been boring at Cheverie, C.B. in the hope of ob- 
taining oil and gas, but had to suspend operations last Novem- 
ber because of the approach of winter. The financial statement 
of the company showed a balance on hand of about $1,000,000, 
and the directors ask the shareholders to contribute sufficient 
additional funds to continue the boring of prospects holes in 
the spring 

Advices from Nova Scotia are to the effect that the Mabou 
coal mine is now being vigourously developed under new mana- 
gement. It is contemplated to increase the shipping facilities 
and make the collierv' a regular shipper during the present year. 
The quality of the coal in the 8 foot seam is very much improved. 

Mr. C. Ochiltree McDonald is again to the front in Nova 
Scotia in connection with the North Atlantic Collieries Com- 
pany, an English corporation, which is planning to open a col- 
liery at South Head, Port Morien, Mr. McDonald is a director 
of this Company, and has recently been interviewed by the Syd- 
ney Record. The company plans are designed for an outjjut 
of a million tons per annum, with shipping point at Curry's 
Cove in Cow Bay. The control of this corporation, it is stated, 
will be in the hands of Canadians, and the policy to be pursued 
will be one of competition with existing Cape Breton collieries. 
The expectations of the company are that they will be able to 
secure the major part of the trade with foreign markets as well 
as hoping to get a share of the home market. 

Memo, areas taken under prospecting License during Feb- 
ruary 1906. — 

DISTRICT. No. OF AREAS. 

Montague 26 

Waverly.* 22 

Uniacke 21 

Stormont 1S2 

East River-Sheet Harbour 43 

Gold River 20 

Lower Selma 24 

East Side, Lake Porter jg 

Black River 12 

Fifteen Mile Steam jq 

Scraggy Lake q 

Millers Lake 39 ' 

Indian Path g 

East Rawdon - 25 



456 



Mining notes. 



The Robb Engineering Company has received an order for 
a 150 horse power tandem compound engine for the Nipissing 
Mining Company, Cobalt, Ont. 

The gold mines and the mill of the Royal Oak Gold Mining 
Co. at Goldenville, N.S., have been placed under the manage- 
ment of Mr. S. G. Evans, under whom it is expected that the 
company will resume its place as a gold producer. The January 
crushing amounted to 133 tons yielding $1,420.00. 

Mr. Mayhew, President of the Cape Breton Coal Iron and 
Railway Co., with two directors, Mr. Gladstone and Mr. Noel 
Humphrey are in Cape Breton, for the purpose of deciding as 
to some matters concerned with the building of the proposed 
railway from Broughton to Louisburg. 

On the morning of February 8th, the Quincy Copper mine, 
near Houghton, Mich., experienced a series of minor earthquakes 
caused by falls of ground producing some terrific air blasts 
throughout the workings. The three southerly shafts numbered 
two, four and seven, were blocked wnih fallen rock and the 
trucks on the skip roads were smashed to splinters. There were 
no fatalities reported; due, probably to the fact that the falls 
occurred between five and seven o'clock in the morning. For 



98 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



the next twenty-four hours the disturbances continued to be 
felt on the surface, and the miners have refused to go under- 
ground. 

Copper news from Boston is bullish, and the market piice 
of copper bears out this sentiment. The Franklin and Tecumseh, 
together with mines on the Kearsarge Lode, are all looking 
extremely well, and the Allouez still keeps up its remarkable 
record; almost all of the properties are making a good showing, 
as they might be expected to do with the remarkably high price 
for copper now obtaining. 

Mr. Colin Campbell of Nova Scotia has expressed the opinion, 
warranted by a long residence and examination of the section, 
that from the Laurentides west of Lake Superior and northerly 
of the height of land will furnish a mining district e(iual to any 
of those in British Columbia. 

The output of the Dominion Coal Company for the month 
of January from the different collieries was as follows: — 
Dominion No. 1 38,211 

2 45,167 

3 20,319 

4 34,319 

■5 4.5,661 

6 4,033 

7 10,180 

8 10,440 

9 23,276 



231,606 



The total shipments were 188,439 tons. 

The output of coal fiom the Dominion Coal Co's collieries 
for February, 1906, was as follows : — 

Dominion No. 1 •. . 38,205 

2 42,757 

3 21,126 

4 35,187 

5 45,302 

6 5,397 

7 8,290 

8 6,564 

9 23,888 

225,716 

The shipments were 168,650. 



The .shipments from the collieries for ihe Cumberland Rail- 
way & Coal Company for the month of February were 39,357 
tons. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

RossLAND. — Developments in the Rossland district during 
February have largely increased the resources of ore, especiall_y 
in the larger mines, the Centre Star, Le Roi and Le Roi No. 2. 
It is contemplated making such developments as will enable 
all of the ore coming from both the War Eagle and Centre Star 
mines to be hoisted through the Centre Star shaft, thus saving 
a good deal of handling, and 200 feet of hoisting. February 
also .saw the first shipment of ore from the Mabel mine, the 
development of which is proving quite satisfactory. The out- 
put of the district for the week ending February 15th, was 1000 
tons greater than for the previous week. 

Lardeau. — The Sunshine, one of the most recently develop- 
ed claims in the district, is close to the well known Silver Cup, 
and the work that has been done has shown a 14 inch vein of 
high grade galena, running continuously through the claim. 
The prospects for this property are stated to be very bright. 

Nelson. — The Hunter V mine, leased by the Hall Mining 
and Smelting Company, is looking extremely well. The most 
recent report is to the effect that a large amount of $20.00 ore 
is now in sight, sufficient to supply all shipments during the 
coming sununer. It is reported that some samples now show 
considerable free silver with a slight amount of galena. 

The first trial of the new Blanchard furnace at the Pilot 
Bay Smelter is reported to have been very successful. 

Slogan. — Local reports state that a large vein of high grade 
zinc ore has been found in the ujjper workings of the Payne 
mine. 

The Rambler Tunnel is now in a total distance of over 3700 
feet, leaving only 800 feet to be driven before the objects of the 
tunnel are attained. It is said that the miners are making 
great progress with the undertaking, and that distances achieved 
each week are satisfactory to the management. 

Reports from the I^ardeau District for last month say that 
activity in that region is now greater than at any time during 
the past three years. During thes(! y(!ars, ])rospectors and 
claim owners have been working on their own account slowly, 
but efficiently enough to demonstrate that they have mineral 
in (juantity and (|uality s\ifficient for profit. 



CoA.sT. — The Potlat^h Creek mine, on Howe Sound, six miles 
south of the Britannia mine, ha.s been acquired by Engli.sh 
capital. The Potlach Creek mine is a galena proposition which 
assays high in silver and lead, and carries some gold. The mine 
is within half a mile of deep water, and two veins are exposed 
on the face of a hill near the shore. Both viens exceed five 
feet in width. 

The Tyee mine, Mount Sicker, Victoria Island, reports the 
discover^' of ore in its 900 foot level. It will be remembered 
that the ore body was lost on the 300 foot level, and that the 
discouragement was severe. Sdoulh the new disco\er\' show 
up as a large body the Coast mines will feel the benefit 'coming 
from the impetus thus given to the district. 

East Ko.otenay. — The record of the St. Eugene mine for 
1905 shows that 130,000 tons were milled, as against 73,000 tons 
in 1904; that 30,000 tons of concentrates were shipped as against 
15,000 tons in 1904; that 40,000,000 pounds of lead were pro- 
duced as against 21,000,000 lbs. in 1904; 1,000,000 ouncas of 
silver as against 541,500 ounces in 1904. Of the total ore and 
concentrates produced only 11,708 tons were shipped to Europe, 
all of the balance having gone to the Nelson and Trail smelters! 
The average metallic contents for the year were: Silver 24 oz. 
and lead 67%. The net earnings of the St. Eugene for 1905 
were in excess of half a million dollars. 

Mr. William Fleet Robertson, Provincial Mineralogist of 
British Columbia, reports the finding of Corj'nite on the Grace 
Dore claim, near Fort Steele. Corynlte is a compound of nickel, 
ansenic, antimony and sulphur. 

Atlin. — The year 1905 in the Atlin istrict did not show 
as many men employed in mining operations as during the year 
1904, nor was the total value of gold produced equal to that 
of the preceding year. The results, however, per capita were 
quite as good as in previous years. One of the draw-backs 
during the past season was the scarcity of water, owing to the 
light snowfall during the preceding winter. The operations of 
the dredge owned by the British American Dredging Company, 
Ltd., showed a very fair return from the amount of gravel 
handled, but difficulty was experienced in getting a sufficient 
amount of gravel, which was due, it is alleged, to the hard 
character of the gravel, or to its cemented condition. On Spruce 
Creek the returns were quite satisfacton,', over 200 men having 
been employed during the season. The output is stated to 
have been over 8$1 10,000.00. 

The Southern C^ross mines, at Uchucklesit Harbor, have 
been sold to an English company promoted by Mr. H. Cecil. 
There has been expended upon the property ' something like 
$30,000, which has proved the great extent of the ore bodies, 
and smelter returns from trial shipments show that profitable 
gold and copper values exist. 

Pay day at the St. Eugene at Moyie for last month dis- 
persed $32,000 among the many employed around that big mine. 

The Broadview mine, in the Lardeau, is now averaging 
about two carloads a month. 

The Del Rey mine, Camborne District, reports the discovery- 
of a new 5 ft. \^'m of free-milling gold quartz, branching from the 
old vein westerly. 

A recent shipment from the Whitewater Mine assayed 233.5 
ozs. of silver, 48 per cent, of lead, and 9 per cent, of zinc. 

The Ymir Mill closed dow n on the 22nd February for two 
months, to enable the development work to catch up with the 
output requirements. For som time the stoping of the reserves 
has exceeded their developments. 

The Consolidated Lake Superior Co. is now prospering, the 
yearly net earnings being in excess of $1,000,000.00. Of this 
amount $500,000.00 is required to pay the interest on the bond 
issue of $10,000,000.00. The Directors state that the Ontario 
Government will be relieved of its guarantee of the $2,000,000.00 
loan on the first of May this year. 

The Swansea mine, in East Kootenay, under bond and lease 
to Messrs. Claudet & Girdwood, hasstartei work. This property, 
though idle for several years, has had a considerable amount of 
development previous to the bond. It is on Windermere 
mountain, about five miles from the Columbia River. The 
bonders are satisfied of the value of the claims in Windermere 
district, and say that railway transportation only is required 
to make the district ore of great merit. 



MINING MEN AND AFFAIRS. 

J. F. B. Vandeleur, M. E., has gone to England to report 
upon certain mining properties which he has been looking mto 
for English capitalists, who propose to invest in nunes in Can- 
ada if they can find anything sufficiently promising. The 
parties concerned have been operating in the Rand and else- 
where. 



THE CANADIAN xMINING REVIEW. 



99 



B. J. Clergne is endeavouring; to float a number of cobalt 
and nickel properties in the Temagami and Sudbury districts 
in Germany, and is said to be meeting with success. 

Prof. Galbraith, of the School of Practical Science, Toronto, 
recently read a paper on the Microscopic Structure of Iron and 
Steel before the Engineers Club. It is to be repeated in the 
near future. 

G. B. Kirkpatrick, Chief of Surveys in the Lands and 
Mines Department for Ontario, read a paper entitled Ovr Xorth- 
ern Heritage before the Ontario Land Surveyors at their annual 
meeting, in which he pointed out the verv valuable character 
of the mineral deposits of Northern Ontario and gave great credit 
to prof. W. G. Miller. Provincial Geologist, for the work he is 
doing. 

MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



ONTARIO. 

The Consumers Coal Company, Limited. Capital .SlOO,- 
000.00 in shares of $5.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Pro- 
visional directors: Gerald Nash, Charles Birrell Elder and James 
Henrv Hammill. 

King Cobalt Mining Company. Capital S.300,000.00, in 
shares of SI. 00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Provisional Di- 
rectors: Alexander McGregor, Harrj- Williamson Page and 
James Patrick McGregor. 

The Jessie Eraser Copper Mining Companv, Limited. 
Capital $250,000.00, in shares of $L00 each. Head' Office, Nia- 
gara Falls. Provisional Directors: Evan Eugene Eraser, Alex- 
ander Sutherland Murray, William Henr>' Ward, David Wilfrid 
Mitchell, James Thos. Lindsay and James Melvin Mitchell. 

The Crown Mining Company, Limited. Capital $1,000,- 
000.00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office: Leamington, 
Ont. Provisional Directors: Frederick Samuel Moss, John 
Henrj' Conover, Edward Winter, Geo. Arthur Brown, Charles 
Lemuel Coultis and Wm. John Clearihue. 

Silver Leaf Mining Company, Limited. Capital $5,000,- 
000,00, in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Pro- 
visional Directors: Clement Albert Foster, Joseph Hawley 
Spencer and Mar\- Ann Hodgson. 

The Silver Star Mining Company, Ltd. Capital $40,000.00, 
in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, New Liskeard, Ont. 
Provisional Directors: William Henrj' Rice, William James 
Evans, Fred Wellington Ferguson, William Votier Cragg and 
Hedley Seymour Hennessy. 

Ben Allen Portland Cement Company, Limited. Capital 
$500,000.00, in shares of $50.00 each. 'Head Office, Owen 
Sound. Provisional Directors: Charles Payton, John Mc- 
Millan, John Michael Ferguson, James Edward Day and Ed- 
ward Vincent O'Sullivan. 

Foster Cobalt Mining Company. Capital $1,000,000.00, 
in shares of $1.00 each. Head Office, Toronto. Provisional 
Directors: Charles Wesley Kerr, Charles Stephen Maclnnes, 
Christopher Charles Robinson, Joseph Hawley Spencer and 
William Edward Watson. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
Black MacKay Mining Company, Limited. — Capital $1,000,- 
000.00. 

Norma Mines, Limited.— $300,000.00 in shares of $1.00 
each. 

Similkameen Mining & Smelting Company, Ltd. — Capital 
$2,000,000.00, in shares of $10.00 each. 

Tel-Kwa Mines, Limited.— Capital $200,000.00, in shares 
of 50 cents each. 

Crescent Mines, Limited. — Capital $1,000,000.00, in shares 
of $1.00 each. 



INDUSTRIAL NOTES. 

Allis-Chalmers-BuUock, Limited, of Montreal, have removed 
their sales office for the Maritime Provinces from Halifax to New 
Glasgow. This is considered a more central locality for the great 
steel, iron and coal industries with which a large portion of their 
business is done. 

It is officially announced that Mr. James A. Milne, who has 
for a number of years been comptroller of the Allis-Chalmers 
Company, Milwaukee, has accepted the position of general 
manager of Allis-ChaLmers-BuUock, Limited, Montreal, Canada, 
to become effective on or before May 1st, 1906. 

Mr. Milne is a native of Canada, having been born at Water- 
down, Ontario, in 1872. He began his business career at Toronto 
in 1888. During the ensuing four years he was with Robert 
Simpson & Company, and Wyld, Grassett & Darling of that place; 
but in 1892 he removed to Chicago, entering the employ of Carson, 
Pirie, cott & Company. He then became associated with Jones, 
Car-sar & Company, chartered accountants of Chicago and New 
York, and it was this connection which brought him into touch 
with the Allis Chalmers Company. Since the early part of last 



autumn, Mr. Milne has been one of the directors of Allis-Chalmers- 
Bullock, Limited, and the fact that he still retains Canadian 
citizenship, and is deeply attached to his early associations, has 
been an important factor in influencing him to heed a recall to 
the Dominion. 

The Allis-Chalmers-Bullock, Limited, Montreal, the Canadian 
representatives of the Allis-Chalmers Company, Milwaukee, 
recently received an order from the Canadian Forty-Mile Gold 
Dredging Company, of Toronto, Canada, for a special gold 
dredge equipped complete with 5^ cu. ft. buckets. The con- 
tract covers the entire machinery equipment complete, ready 
for operation, including electric light plant, two boilers, 100-h.p. 
each, engines, pumps, etc. The dredge will be ready for use 
early in May. 

The Allis-Chalmers Company has in preparation for the 
account of its Mining and Crushing Machinery Department the 
following publication: — 

The Granby Consolidated Mining , Smelting and Power Com- 
pany, Granby, B.C., one of the larger mining interests in British 
Columbia, has recently added another converter stand, complete 
with hydraulic cylinder for operating the same, to those already 
installed. The new equipment was purchased from the Allis- 
Chalmers Company, Milwaukee. 

Among recent sales by Allis-Chalmers-Bullock, Limited, 
Montreal, were thirty of the latest improved type Coal Cutters to 
the Dominion Coal Co., Glace Bay, C.B.; two compound steam- 
driven air compressors to the Acadia Coal Company, Stellarton, 
N.S., and a 425-kw alternating current generator for the Cor- 
poration of Parry Sound. 

The Westinghouse Machine Company have opened a Phil- 
adelphia sales office in Room 1003 North American Building. 
The establishment of this office was necessitated by their rapidly 
expanding business in this territory, particularly in gas engines 
and Westinghouse-Parsons steam turbines, and is in line with the 
progressive policy of the company to establish headquarters in 
all large industrial cities. 

We are in receipt of Bulletin 1400 upon "Gold Dredges" 
from the mining and crushing department of the Allis-Chalmers 
Co., Milwaukee, represented in Canada by Allis-Chalmers- 
Bullock, Limited, Montreal. Gold dredging is a comparatively 
new method of recovering the precious metal and one which has 
proved extremely profitable where it has been undertaken under 
proper direction, and with dredges skilfully designed, well built 
and adapted to the work. This present bulletin illustrates a 
double lift long sluice dredge built for the Bonanza Basin Gold 
Dredging Co., on the Klondyke, and gives an interesting des- 
cription of the operation and of the working parts. 

The Westinghouse Machine Company filed a bill of complaint 
on February 9th, in the Circuit Court of the United States for the 
District of Ne^\- Jersey, against the Allis-Chalmers Company, 
alleging that the Allis-Chalmers Company in the manufacture 
and sale of its turbine, is infringing Patent No. 655,414, issued 
to Mr. Chas. A. Parsons, August 7th, 1900. This invention was 
made jointly by Parsons, Stoney and FuUagar, and is for Steam 
Turbine Ring of Blades covering the method of construction 
used by the Allis-Chalmers Company for securing the blades and 
vanes in place in their respective holding elements. An assign- 
ment of the entire rights under this patent was secured by the 
Machine Company from Chas, A. Parsons on January 10th, 1905, 
both Stoney and Fullagar having assigned their interest in the 
same to Parsons prior to the assignment of the patent. 



REPORT ON PATENTS— CANADIAN. 

809,322 — Apparatus for the Complete combustion of Solid Fuel. 
Adam Pfeifer, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany. 
In a furnace in combination, a grate, a main flue, in 
the rear of said grate, combustion-spaces besides said 
main flue, air-inlets for said combustion spaces, and 
air-inlets behind said grate into said main flue, said 
combustion-spaces having apertures communicating 
with said main flue. 

809,295 — Gas Producer. Jerome R. George, Worcester, Mass., 
assignor to Morgan Construction Company, Worcester, 
Mass., a Corporation of Massachusetts. 
The combination with the heating-chamber having an 
opening at its top for the admission of fuel, of a fuel- 
reservoir placed above said opening and having an 
opening in its bottom for the delivery to a distributer, 
a distributer between the opening in the heating 
chamber and the opening in the reservoir, said dis- 
tributer consisting of a rotating shell smaller at its 
lower than at its upper end, with an opening at its 
upper end larger than the deliver-opening of said 
reservoir and concentric with its axis of rotation, and 
with an opening at its lower end eccentric with its 
axis of rotation, and a disk inclosed in said distributer 
having its diameter larger than the diameter of the 
delivery-opening in said reservoir, with an annular space 
around said disk for the passage of fuel. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



809,765 — Ore Concentrator. George M. Whitney, Lawson, Colo. 

An ore-concentrator, comprising a bed for the ore to 
be separated, tubes therethrough for the discharge of 
the mineral portion of the material, other tubes having 
movable relation with said first-named tubes for re- 
gulating such discharge, a .supporting member for the 
second-mentioned .tubes, and a vertically-swinging 
member connected with the said supporting-member. 

809,522— Dump Car. Thomas R. McKnight, Aurora, 111., 
assignor to Western Wheeled Scraper Company' 
Aurora, lU., a Corporation of Illinois. 
A dump-car, consisting of a wheeled truck, a tilting 
car-body having an open end, an edgewi.se movable 
gate therefor, a rotary support on which said car-body 
rest.s, and means rotating with the car-body for auto- 
matically holding up the end gate when the car-body 
is tilted to dump the load. 

810,249^Method of Refining Copper. Ralph Baggaley, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., Charles M. Allen, Lolo, Mont., and Edward 
W. Lindquist, Chicago, 111., said Allen and Lindquist 
assignors to said Baggaley. 

A method which consists in injecting into a bath of 
molten copper, granulated or comminuted hydro- 
carbon-gas-producing material, non-abrasive aiid of 
such nature that it will not melt and clog in the twyers 
at the temperatures there present. 

809,939 — Apparatus for Recovering Precious Metals. Edward 
J. Garvin, Portland, Oreg., assignor to Garvin Cyanide 
Extraction Company, a Corporation of Oregon. 
The combination with a main tank for receiving the 
pulverized ore and solvent, of a separating-tank in- 
cluding means for separating the material,' attached 
to the main tank near its top, and an amalgamating- 
tank including means for amalgamating the material 
.suspended above the main tank, and means for causing 
a continuous circulation of the materials and solution 
through said tanks. 

809,998 — Maiuifacture of Artificial Fuel. August Stillesen New 
York, N.Y. 

A process of producing solid petroleum for fuel which 
consists in mingling, approximately, seventy-five parts 
by \veight of petroleum, sixteen "parts by weight of 
turpentine, two parts by weight of sodium palmitate 
or sodium sterate, then adding five parts by weight 
of caustic soda and two parts by weight of water and 
heating and agitating, in the manner explained. 

810, .301 — Apparatus for Storing and Conveying Liquid Metals. 

Casimir von Philp, Bethlehem, Pa., assignor to Beth- 
lehem Steel Company, South Bethlehem, Pa., a Cor- 
poration of Pennsylvania. 

An apparatus for storing and transporting molten 
metal consisting of a vessel and suitable trucks sup- 
porting the same, the vessel having an enlarged body 
portion and hollow contracted cylindrical ends con- 
taining burning-chambers and means for admitting 
fuel thereto, said ends turning in bearings on the 
trucks. 

810,063 — Duplex Smelting Furnace. Robert Lindermann, Osna- 
bruck, Germany. 

In a duplex snielting-furnace, a primary hearth capable 
of being intensely heated, an inner refractory wall 
around .said hearth, an outer metal casing surrounding 
said inner wall, air-passages in said outer casing, an 
air-inlet communicating with the said air-passages 
and with a .source of air under pressure, a baffle-plate 
for directing the admission of the air in opposite direc- 
tions from the said air-passages round the furnace to 
the said hearth, air-holes at the base of the primary 
hearth for admitting the air. under pressure thereto, 
a movable plate adapted to shut off hermetically the 
ash-pit from the primary hearth, and a secondary 
hearth alongside the primary hearth and capable of 
being heated by the waste heat from the primary 
hearth. 

810,605 — Conveyer. Clarence K. Baldwin and Thomas Robbins, 
Jr., New York, N.Y., assignors to The Robins Con- 
veying Belt Co., a Corporation of New Jersey. 
The combination with a support, of a conveyer and 
conveyer-frame mounted to travel thereon, and 
having the delivery end of the conveyer both ver- 
tically and horizontally movable, and an engine or 
motor for operating the conveyer mounted upon the 
conv(!y('r-frame. 

811,040 — Sintering Comminuted Ore or Flue-Dust. George L. 

Davison, Chicago, 111., assignor to American Sintering 

(Jompany, Chicago, 111., a (Corporat ion of Illinois. 

A process which consists in mixing the on; or flue-dust 



with a small percentage of comminuted fluor, then 
passing the mixture gradually through a furnace and 
heating it until the mixture fuses sufficiently to cohere, 
and agglomerating the mixture into lumps by agitation 
while this in partially-fu.sed condition. 

810 51.3~.Miner's Drill Henry Todd, Manshfield, Ohio. 

The combination of a supporting-frame or upright 
composed of pivoted .selections adapted for approxi- 
mately vertical alinement or angular adjustment, 
points for the .sections, and a Ijrace connecting the 
.sections and adjustable to hold the same vertically 
aline or arranged at an angle to each other. 

810,771— Du.st Collector. Bernard Kern, Jr., Toledo, Ohio. 

In a dust-collector, an open reel or drum having its 
periphery formed with equidistant bars or .slats, an 
open-nieshed fabric .secure circumferentially of the 
reel or drum and having a fold loo.sely dispo.sed be- 
tween each pair of bars or slats, a separate radially- 
movable member loo.sely engaging the iimer extremity 
of each of said folds, a spring associated with each of 
said members for normally retaining the engaged fold 
taut, and a cam member fixed to the axis of the reel 
or drum for coacting with and imparting an outward 
radial movement to each of said fold-negaging members 
at a fixed point in its travel to cau.se the tension on 
the fold to be lessened and suddenly renewed for the 
purpose described. 

810,619 — Steam-Boiler Superheater. Francis J. Cole, New York, 
N.Y., assignor to American Locomotive Company, 
New York, N.Y., a Corporation of New York. 
The combination with a tubular steam-boiler, of 
.superheating tubes outer .superheater-pipes projecting 
thereinto and having their rear ends closed, inner 
circulating-pipes open at both ends and located 
within the outer superheater-pipes, an insertible and 
removable header, partitioned vertically into two 
chambers, communicating, respectively, with the 
outer superheater-pipes and the inner circulating- 
pipe.s, of a vertical row, a steam-supply connection 
opening into the header-chamber of the outer pipes, 
and a steam-delivery connection leading out of the 
header-chamber of the inner pipes. 

811,08.5 — Process of Recovering Values from Sulfid Ores. Edwin 
C. Pohle, Reno, Nev. 

A process which consists in mixing the ore w'ith a 
chlorid, subjecting the mixture to heat in an oxidizing 
atmosphere, cooling the product, leaching the mass 
with water, to remove the contained bodies soluble 
therein, leaching the residue with a solution of a 
cyanid of an alkali metal, and finally, precipitating the 
gold and silver from the solution. 
811,239 — Manufacture of Nickel-Copper Alloys. Ambrose 
Monell, New York, N.Y. 

The method of making an alloy of nickel and copper 
which consists in smelting ore containing sulfids of 
said metals, bes.semerizing the resulting matte, calcin- 
ing the bessemerized product to bring the metals into 
the form of oxids, then reducing the oxids and pro- 
ducing directly a malleable nickel-copper alloy with- 
out separating the.se metals from each other. 
811,196— Cylinder for Treating Heated Metal. George H. 

Benjamin, New York, N.Y., assignor to The Coe 
Brass Manufacturing Company, a Corporation of 
Connecticut. 

A container for treating heated metal under pressure, 
comprising a cylinder, a winding of asbestos-covered 
wire upon the cylinder, the said wire being distributed 
as spaced coils, and an enclosing jacket. 

811,192 — Separator. Freeman R. WilLson, Jr., Columbus, Ohio.', 
assignor to Jo.seph A. Jeffrey, Columbus, Ohio. 
In a screening mechanism for ore to similar materials, 
the combination of the .series of inclined superposed 
screens, the longitudinally-reciprocating actuating 
revices pivotally connected to and arranged to support 
each screen of said series near its centre the ends of 
each screen being free to vibrate about the axis of 
the screen's pivotal connection with .said reciprocating 
device independent of the vibration of the ends of 
any other screen of the series, and the series of vibrat- 
ing sustaining devices, each pivotally connected to 
the central part of one of said screens and also con- 
nected to a relatively statiqnaiy support. 

81 1,079 — Stamp Actuating Mechanism for Ore-Crushers. Walter 
S. McKinney, ChicagOi, 111. 

The combination of a driving-gear, a cam-shaft, a cam 
upon .said shaft, driving coimections between the 
driving-gear and cani-shaft, and supports adjustably 
supporting said cam-shaft to move bodily in an arc 
concentric with the axis of the driving-gear. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xxiii 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC 

The Attention of Miners and Capitalists in the United States 
and in Europe is invited to the 

Great Mineral Territory 

open for Investment in the Province of Quebec. 



Gold, Silver, Copper, Iron, Asbestos, Mica, Plumbago, Phosphate, 

Chromic Iron, Galena, Etc. 

Ornamental and Structural Materials in Abundant Variety. 

The Mining. Law gives absolute security to Title, and has been 
specially framed for the encouragement of Mining. 



All mines belong to the government of the Province on all 
unsold lands and on all those sold since the 24th of July 1880, 
but gold and silver are always reserved, whatever may be the 
date when the land was sold, unless it be otherwise mentioned 
in the patent. 

The government grants PROSPECTING LICENSES for 
lands on which the mines belong to it, giving the holders of such 
licenses the first right to purchase the mines. In the case of 
lands where the surface alone is sold, the owner of the surface 
may be expropriated if he refuses an amicable settlement. 

The price of prospecting licenses is $5.00 per 100 acres on 
surveyed lands and per square mile on unsurveyed lands. If 
the surface has already been sold, the price is only $2.00. They 
are valid for three months and are renewable at the" discretion 
of the Minister. 

When mines are discovered, they can be bought or leased 
from the government. The purchase price is as follows: 

Mining for superior metals on lands situate more than 12 
miles from a railway in operation, $5.00 per acre and on lands 
situate less than 12 miles from such a railway, $10.00 per acre; 

Mining for inferior metals — the price and the area of the 
concessions are fixed by the Lieutenant Governor in council. 

The words "superior metals" include the ores of gold, 
silver, lead, copper, nickel and also graphite, asbestos and 
phosphate of lime; and the words "inferior metals" mean and 
include all the minerals and ores not included in the foregoing 
definition and which are of appreciable value. 

MINING CONCESSIONS are sold in entire lots in surveyed 
townships or in blocks of not less than 100 acres in unsurveyed 
territories. 

Patents are obtained subject to the following conditions: 
The full price must be paid in cash; specimens must be produced 



and accomyianied by an affidavit ; a survey at the cost of the 
applicant must be made on unsurveyed lands; work must be 
bona fide begun within two years. 

Mining licenses giving the right to work the mine and dispose 
of its products, are granted on payment of a fee of $5.00 and a 
rent of $1.00 per acre per annum. Such licenses are valid for 
one year and are renewable on payment of the fee and of the 
same rent. They may cover from 1 to 200 acres for one and 
the same person and must be marked out on the ground by 
posts. The description or designation must, however, be made 
to the satisfaction of the Minister. 

Persons working mines must send in yearly repoi'ts of their 
operations to the government. 



The attention of the public is specially called to the new 
territory north of the height of land towards James Bay, which 
comprises an important mineral belt in which remarkable dis- 
coveries of minerals have already been made and through which 
the New Grand Trunk Pacific Railway will run. 



The Government has made special arrangements with Mr. 
Milton L. Hersey, 171 St. James Street, Montreal, for the assay 
and analysis of minerals at veiy reduced rates for the benefit 
of miners and prospectors in the Province of Quebec. Tariffs 
of assays can be obtained on application to him. 

The Bureau of Mines at Quebec, under the direction of the 
Superintendant of Mines will give all the information asked for 
in connection with the mines of the Province of Quebec and 
will supply maps, pamphlets, copies of the law, tariff for assays, 
etc., to all who apply for same. 

Applications should be addressed to: 



THE HON. MINISTER OF GGLONIZATION, MINES AND FISHERIES, 

PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, QUEBEC 



xxiv 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Ontario's 

MINING 
LANDS 



X 'T^HE Crown domain of the Province of Ontario contains an area ~^ 

1 ?^ 0"^^^ 100,000,000 acres, a large part of which is comprised 
I' in geological formations known to carry valuable minerals ^ 

-T- and extending northward from the great lakes and westward from -> 

the Ottawa river to the Manitoba boundary. 
^ Iron in large bodies of magnetite and hematite ; copper in sulphide a, 

and native form; gold, mostly in free milling quartz; silver, native T 
and sulphides; zincblendes, galena, pyrites, mica, graphite, talc, marl, 
; brick clay, building stones of all kinds and other useful minerals have 

-f- been found in many places and are being worked at the present time. -f- 

-f- In the famous Sudbury region Ontario possesses one of the two ^ 

^ sources of the world's supply of nickel, and the known deposits of this x 

X metal are very large. Recent discoveries of corundum in Eastern T" 

Ontario are believed to be the most extensive in existence. 
I The output of iron, copper and nickel in 1903 was much beyond ^ 

-f- that of any previous year, and large developments in there industries -f- 

-4- are now going on. _a 

^ In the older parts of the Province salt, petroleum and natural 'T 

i gas are important products. 

"T" The mining laws of Ontario are liberal, and the prices of mineral ^ 

lands low. Title by freehold or lease, on working conditions for seven -4- 
years. There are no royalties. 

The climate is unsurpassed, wood and water are plentiful, and in 
^ the summer season the prospector can go almost anywhere in a 

. canoe. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway runs through the entire mineral 
belt. -4- 

ForreportsoftheBureauof Mines, maps, mining laws, etc., apply -4- 
to . 

HON. FRANK COCHRANE, ^ 

Commissioner of Lands and Mines. 

X ' THOS. W. GIBSON, 

-f- Director Bureau of Mines, 

Toronto, Ontario. 

: t 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XXV 




PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 



Leases for Mioes of Gold, Site, Coal, Iroo, Copper, Lead, Tio 



[ 

1 

r 



PRECIOUS STONES. 



TITLES GIVEN DIRECT FROM THE CROWN, ROYALTIES AND RENTALS MODERATE. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 



Under the provisions of Chap. 1, Acts of 1892, of Mines and Minerals, 
Licenses are issued for prospecting Gold and Silver for a term of twelve 
months. Mines of Gold and Silver are laid off in areas of 150 by 250 feet, 
any number of which up to one hundred can be included in one License, 
provided that the length of the block does not exceed twice its width. The 
cost is 50 cents per area. Leases of any number of areas are granted for a 
term of 40 yeiirs at $2.00 per area. These leases are forfeitable if not worked, 
but advantage can be taken of a recent Act by which on payment of 50 cents 
annually for each area contained in the lease it becomes non-forfeitable if 
the labor be not performed. 



Licenses are issued to owners of quartz crushing mills, who are required 
to pay Royalty on all the Gold they extract at the rate of two per cent, on 
smelted Gold valued at $19 an ounce, and on smelted Gold valued at $18 
an ounce. 

Applications for Licenses or Leases are receivable at the office of the 
Commissioner of Public Works and Mines each week day from 10 a.m. to 
4 p.m., except Saturday, when the hours are from 10 to 1. Licenses are 
issued in the order of application according to priority. If a person dis- 
covers Gold in any part of the Province, he may stake out the boundaries 
of the areas he desires to obtain, and this gives him one week and twenty- 
four hours for every 15 miles from Halifax in which to make application at 
the Department for his ground 



MINES OTHER THAN GOLD AND SILVER. 



Licenses to search for eighteen months are issued, at a cost of thirty 
dollars, for minerals other than Gold and Silver, out of which areas can be 
selected for mining under lease. These leases are for four renewable terms 
of twenty years each. The cost for the first year is fifty dollars, and an 
annual rental of thirty dollars secures each lease from liability to forfeiture 
for non-working. 

All rentals are refunded if afterwards the areas are worked and pay 
royalties All titles transfer: etc , of minerals are registered by the Mines 
Department for a nominal tee and provision is made for lessees and licensees 
whereby they can acquire promptly either by arrangement with the owner 
or by arbitration all lands required for thier mining works. 

The Government as a security for the payment of royalties, makes the 
royalties firjt lien on the plant and fixtures of the mine. 



The unusually generous condition under which the Government of 
Nova Scotia grants its minerals have introduced many outside capitalists, 
who have always stated that the Mining laws of the Province were the best 
they had had experience of. 

The royalties on the remaining minerals are: Copper, four cents on 
every unit; Lead, two cents upon every unit; Iron, five cents on every ton; 
Tin and Precious Stones, five per cent.; Coal, 10 cents on every ton sold. 

The Gold district of the Province extends along its entire Atlantic 
coast, and varies in width from 10 to 40 miles, and embraces an area of over 
three thousand miles, and is traversed by good roads and accessible at all 
points by water. Coal is known in the Counties of Cumberland, Colchester 
Pictou, and Antigonish, and at numerous points in the Island of Cape Breton 
The ores of Iron, Copper, etc., are met at numerous points, and are being 
rapidlv secured by miners and investors. 



Copies of the Mining Law and any information can be had on appUcation to 

The Hon. W.T. PIPES, 

Commissioner Public Works and Mines, 

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA. 



xxvi 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




DOMINION OF CANADA 



SYNOPSIS OF CANADIAN NORTH-WEST 
MINING REGULATIONS. 



COAL— Coal lands may be purchased at $10 per acre for soft coal and $20 for 
anthracite. Not more than 320 acres can be acquired by one individual or company. 
Royalty at the rate of 10 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds shall be collected on the gross 
output. 

QUARTZ— A tree miner's certificate is granted upon payment in advance of $7.50 
per annum for an individual, and from $50 to $100 per annum for a company, 
according to capital. 

A free miner having discovered mineral in place, may locate a claim 1,500 feet x 
1,500 feet. 

The fee for recording a claim is $5. 

At least $100 must be expended on the claim each year, or paid to the mining 
recorder in lieu thereof. When $500 has been expended or paid, the locator may, 
upon having a survey, made, and upon complying with other requirements, purchase 
the land at $1 an acre. 

The patent provides for the payment of a royalty of 2^ per cent, on the sales. 

Placer mining claims generally are 100 feet square ; entry fee $5, renewable ' 
yearly, 

A free miner may obtain two leases to dredge for gold of five miles each for a 
term of twenty years, renewable at the discretion of the Minister of the Interior. 

The lessee shall have a dredge in operation within one season from the date of 
the lease for each five miles. Rental $10 per annum for each mile of river 
leased. Royalty at the rate of 2^ per cent, collected on the output after it exceeds 
$10,00C 

W. W. CORY, 

Deputy of the Minister of the Interior. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XXVll 



DEEP 




ILLING 



makes economical mining and the deepest hole 
can be drilled at the smallest cost by a 



DIAMOND 
ROCK DRILL 



It can cut through 2,500 feet of solid rock in a 
vertical line. It brings up solid cylinders of rock, 
showing formation and character. 



Made in all capacities, for 
Hand or Horsepower, Steam 
or Compressed Air— mounted 
or unmounted. 



You will find lots of 
Information in our 
new catalogue— may 
we send it? 




American Diamond Roci( Drill Company 

95 Liberty Street, NEW YORK CITY, U.S.A. 

Cable Address, "Deciduous," New York. 



xxviii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



1 



HADFIELD'S — SHEFFIELD 

Hecloti Rock and Ore Breaker 

HADFIELD AND JACK'S PATENT 

The only Perfect Gyratory Stone-Crusher 

THE PARTS THAT ARE SUBJECT TO EXCESSIVE WEAR ARE MADE OF 

Hadfield's Patent "Era" Maganese Steel 

WE MANUFACTURE JAW BREAKERS, CRUSHING ROLLS 
ELEVATORS, BIN GATES, AND GOLD MINING REQUISITES^ 



Sole Representatives of the Hadfleld Steel Foundry Company, Ltd., Sheffield, for Canada. 
PEACOCK BROTHERS, Canada Life Building, Montreal. 




M. BEATTY & SONS, u 



MITED 



WEILLAND, ONTARIO 




MANUFACTURERS OF 



DREDGES 
DERRICKS 
MINE HOISTS 
CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS 
for SAND and WATER 

STONE DERRICKS 
STEEL SKIPS 



DITCHERS 
STEAM SHOVELS 
HOISTING ENGINES 
SUBMARINE ROCK 

DRILLING MACHINERY 

CLAM-SHELL BUCKETS 
COAL AND CONCRETE TUBS 



AND OTHER CONTRACTORS' MACHINERY 



AGENTS: 

E. Leonard & Sons, Montreal, Que., and St. John, N.B. The Stuart Machinery Co.. Winnipeg. Man. 

The Wm. Hamilton Mfg. Co.. Vancouver, B.C. 



HEINE SAFETY BOILER 




MANUFACTURED BY 



The Canadian Heine Safety Boiler Co. 



TORONTO, ONT. 



THE HEINE SAFETY BOILER-Made in un- 
its of 100 to 500 h.p., and can be set in batteries^ of any 
number. Suitable for Mines, Pulp Mills, Water and Elec- 
tric Installations, and large plants generally. The best 
and most economical boiler made. 



I 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



i 



Westinghouse Motors 



For nine Work 

Increase Production 
Decrease Costs 

Westinghouse Motor-Driven mining machinery is 
effecting economies in operation and increasing pro- 
duction to such a marked degree, that mines adhering 
to the old methods of driving are becoming the excep- 
tion; they find they cannot compete with plants having 
modern equipments. 




Westixghoc sK IxDucnOiN Motor 
Drivingf Quintuplex Mine Pump. 



Canadian Westingfhouse Co., Limited 

General Office and Works: HAiVlILTON, OiNT. 

For particulars address nearest office 

Lawlor Bldg., King and Yonge Sts. Sovereign Bank of Canada Bldg. 

TORONTO HAMILTON MONTREAL 

152 Hastings Street 922-923 Union Bank BIdg. 134 GranvtUe Street - 

VANCOUVER WINNIPEG HALIFAX 




AFRICAN CONCESSIONS telegraphic address: LOBNITZ, RENFREW. 



DIAMOND DRILLS 

Our Drills are of the latest design and represent the 
highest point of perfection yet reached. Operated by 
hand power, horse power, steam, air, and electricity. 
Send for Catalogue. 

STANDARD DIAMAND DRILL CO. 

Chamber of Corameree Building, Chicago, U.S.A. 



ii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co. 

LIMITED. 

PROPRIETORS, MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF 

Sydney IVjines Bitumir]ous Goal 

Unexcelled Fuel for Steamships and Locomotives, 
Manufactories, Rolling Mills, Forges, Glass Works, 
Brick and Lime Burning, Coke, Gas Works, and 
for the Manufacture of Steel, Iron, etc. : : : : 

COLLIERIES AT SYDNEY MINES, CAPE BRETON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



HAMMERED AND ROLLED STEEL 

FOR MINING PURPOSES 

Pit Rails, Tee Rails, Edge Rails, Fish Plates, Bevelled Steel Screen bars. Forged 
Steel Stamper Shoes and Dies, Blued Machinery Steel Yz' to %" Diameter, Steel 
Tub Axies Cut to Length, Crow Bar Steel, Wedge Steel, Hammer Steel, Pick 
Steel, Draw bar steel. Forging of all kinds. Bright Compressed Shafting, W to 
W true to 2-IOOO part of one inch. 



A FULL STOCK OF 

MILD FLAT, RIVET-ROUND & ANGLE STEELS 

ALWAYS ON HAND 

Special Attention Paid to Miners' Requirements. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



STEEL WORKS and Head Office: NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Ill 



COAL 

DOMINION COAL CO., LTD. 

GLACE BAY, C.B., CANADA 

MINERS OF 



BITUMINOUS COALS 

The celebrated "Reserve" 
coal for Household use. 



"INTERNATIONAL" GAS COAL 

And the best steam coal from its 
Collieres on the Phalen seam. 



YEARLY OUTPUT 3,500,000 TONS 




Shipping facilities at Sydney and Louisburg, C.B., of most modem type. Steamers carrying 5,000 tons loaded in twenty- 
four hours. Special attention given to quick loading of sailing vessels, small vessels loaded with quickest despatch. 

BUNKER COAL. 

The Dominion Coal Company has provided unsurpassed facilities for bunkering ocean-going steamers with despatch. Specia 
attention given to prompt loading. Steamers of any size are bunkered without detention. 

By improved screening appliances, lump coal for domestic trade is supplied, of superior quality. 
Prices, terms, etc., may be obtained at the offices of the Company. 

ALEXANDER DICK, General Sales Agent, Glace Bay, C.B. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, 112 St. James Street, Montreal, Que. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, 171 Lower Water Street, Halifax, N.S. 

DOMINION COAL COMPANY, Limited, Quebec, Que. 

AND FROM THE FOLLOWING AGENTS : 



R. P. & W. F. STARR, St. John, N.B. 

PEAKE BROS. & CO., Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

HULL, BLYTH & CO., 4 Fenchurch Avenue, London, E.C. 



Jc E. HARLOW, 95 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 
HARVEY & CO., St. Johns, Newfoundland. 
A. JOHNSON & CO., Stockholm, Sweden. 



G. H. DUGGAN, Third Vice-President. 



THE CANADIAN MIMING REVIEW. 




RUBBER GOODS 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 



THE MARK OF QUALITY 

When you see this Trade Mark 
on a Rubber Article — 

IT'S RIGHT. 



The Canadian Robber 
Company OF Montreal 

(LIMITED) 
Sales Branches and Warehouses : 

172 Granville St. HALIFAX, N,S. 

Imperial Bank BIdg., IHONTREAL, Que. 
Front & Vonge Sts. - TORONTO, Ont. 
Princess Street - WINNIPEG, Man . 
Cordova Street - VANCOUVER, B.C 



FOR MINING PURPOSES 

Rubber Belting, Fire Hose, Steam and Air Hose, High Pressure 
* Star Red " Sheet Packing, Valve and Piston Packings, Sheave 
and Pulley Fillings, Rubber Bumpers, and Springs, Rubber 
Clothing and Boots, Etc. 




View of Factories, Montreal, Quebec. Floor area, 21 acres. 



John A. Roebling's Sons Company 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



OF NEW YORK 



HIGHEST GRADE WIRE ROPE 

OF ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



ELECTRICAL WIRES OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 





117-121 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK CITY -:- NEW YORK 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



V 



WALKER BROTHERS (WiGAN) LIMITED 

^ WIGAN, ENGLAND 




Largest Air Compressors in Canada 

are of WALKER BROTHERS (Wigan) LIMITED manufacture. 



THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES HAVE INSTALLED WALKER BROTHERS AIR COMPRESSORS, 
IN CAPACITIES RANGING UP TO 6300 CUBIC FEET OF FREE AIR PER MINUTE, ALL 
OF WHICH ARE PROVIDED WITH WALKER PATENT AIR VALVES. 



Dominion Coal Company Ltd. 
Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. 
Intercolonial Coal Mining Co. Ltd. 



Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company Ltd. 

Belmont Gold Mine Ltd. 

Cape Breton Coal, Iron & Railway Co. Ltd. 



Representatives E R ^^^T H E R 



Canada Life Building 
MONTREAL, P.Q. 



vi 



THE CANADIAN 



MINING REVIEW. 



\ 



BY THE LINES OF THE 

Canadian 
Pacific 
Railway 

All important points in Canada and the United 
States can be reached. 

Fast Trains 

To Quebec, the Laurentians, Eastern Town- 
ships, St. John, N.B., Halifax, Boston, Wor- 
cester, Springfield, Mass., New York, Portland, 
Me., and the principal Atlantic Seaside resorts, 
Kawartha Lakes, Toronto, Niagara Falls, De- 
' troit, Chicago, Ottawa, the Temiskaming, Mis- 
sissaga,French River, New Ontario, Sault Ste. 
Marie, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Winnipeg and 
the Western Prairies, the Kootenay Mining 
regions, the Mountains of British Columbia — 
unrivalled for scenic grandeur — Vancouver and 
the Pacific Coast. 

Fast Steamship 
Service 

On the Upper Lakes, Owen Sound to Fort 
William, on the inland waters of British Col- 
umbia, on the Pacific Coast to China, Japan, 
Australia, via Honolulu and Suva, and to 
Skagway en route to the Yukon. The fastest 
and most luxuriously furnished steamers be- 
tween Victoria, Vancouver and Seattle, and on 
the Atlantic Ocean between Bristol, London, 
Liverpool, Montreal and Quebec, in summer, 
and St. John in winter. 

Double Daily 
Transcontinental 
Train Service 

During summer months, and Daily Transcon- 
tinental Service during winter months. 

For illustrated pamphlets apply to any Can- 
adian Pacific Railway Agent, or to 

c. E. Mcpherson, c. e. e. ussher, 

General Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, 

Western Lines, Eastern Lines, 

WINNIPEG, Man. MONTREAL. 

ROBERT KERR, 

Passenger Traffic Manager, 

MONTREAL. 




AFFILIATED TO 
QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY 

Kingston, Ontario 



THE FOLLOWING COURSES ARE OFFERED 

1 . Three Years' Course for a Diploma in 

(a) Mining Engineering and Metallurgy. 

(b) Chemistry and Mineralogy. 

(c) Mineralogy and Geology. 

(d) Chemical tlngineering. 

(e) Civil Engineering. 

(/) Mechanical Engineering. 

(g) Electrical Engineering. 

(h) Biology and Public Health, and 

2. Four Years' Course for a Degree (B.Sc.) in 

the same. 

3 . Courses in Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geol- 

ogy for degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

For futher information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

4. Post-Graduate Course for the Degree of 

Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) 

For further information see the Calendar of Queen's 
University. 

fTlHE SCHOOL is provided with well equipped 
laboratories for the study of Chemical Analysis, 
Assaying, Blow-piping, Mineralogy, Petrography and 
Drawing. It has also a well equipped Mechanical 
Laboratory. The Engineering Building is provided 
with modern appliances for the study of mechanical 
and electrical engineering. The Mineralogy, Geology 
and Physics Building offers the best facilities for the 
theoretical and practical study of those subjects. 
The Mining Laboratory has been remodelled at a cost 
of some $12,000, and the operations of crushing, 
cyaniding, etc., can be studied on a large scale. 

The school is prepared to make a limited number 
of mill runs on gold ores in lots of 2 to 20 tons during 
the months of September, October and November, 
and will undertake concentrating test on large lots of 
ore from December to March. 

For Calendar of the School and 
further information apply to 

The Secretary, School of Mining, 
Kingston, Ont. 



THEj^CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



vii 



The Bank of British North America 

Established in 1836. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter in 1840. 
CAPITAL PAID UP - - - - $4,866,667 

RESERVE FUND . . - - - 2,141,333 

LONDON OFFICE: 5 GRACECHURCH STREET, E.C. 
COURT OF DIRECTORS 
R. H. Glyn F. Lubbock 



E. A. Hoare 
H.J. B.KendaU 



C. W. Tomkinson. 
Geo. D. Whatman 
W. S. Goldby, Manager. 



J. H. Brodie 
J.J. Cater 
H. R. Farrer 
A. G. Wallis, Secretary. 

HEAD OFFiCe IN CANADA, ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL. 

H. Stikeman, Gen. Manager. J. FJmsly, Supt. of Branches. 

J. Anderson, Inspector. 

BRANCHES IN CANADA: 



Montreal, A. E. FJlis, Manager. 
Alexander, Man. 
Ashcroft, B.C. 
Battleford, Sask. 
Belmont, Man. 
Bobcaygeon, Ont. 
Brandon, Man. 
Brantford, Ont. 
Calgary. Alta. 
Campbellford, Ont. 
Davidson, Sa.sk. 
Dawson, Yukon Dist 
Duck Lake. Sask. 
Duncans, B.C. 
Estevan, Sask. 
Fenelon Falls, Ont. 
Fredericton, N.B. 
Greenwood, B.C. 

AGENCIES 



J. R. Ambrose, Sub. Mgr. 
Halifax, N.S. Ottawa, Ont. 

Hamilton, Ont. Quebec. P.Q. 

" " Barton St. Reston, Man. 
" Victoria avRossland. B.C. 
Hedley, B.C. Rosthern, Sask 

Kaslo, B.C. St. John, N.B. 

Kingston, Ont. " Union Street. 

Levis. P.Q. Toronto, Ont. 

London, Ont. " " King St. 

Market Square. Toronto Junction, Ont. 
Longueull, Que. Trail, B.C. 

Montreal, Que. Vancouver. B.C. 

St. James St. Victoria, B.C. 
St. Catherine St. Weston, Ont. 
Midland, Ont. Winnipeg. Man. 

North Vancouver, B.C. Yorkton, Sask. 
Oak River. Man. 

N THE UNITED STATES. 

Lawson, H. M. J. McMichael and W. T. 



New York (52 WaU St.)— W 

San Francisco (120 Sansome St.) — J. C. Welsh, and A. S. Ireland, Agents. 
Chicago — Merchants Loan & Trust Co. 

London Bankers— The Bank of England and Messrs. Glyn & Co 
Foreign Agents — Liverpool — Bank of Liverpool. Scotland — National 
Bank of Scotland, Limited, and branches. Ireland — Provincial Bank of 
Ireland, Limited, and branches; National Bank, Limited, and branches. 
Australia — Union Bank of Australia, Ltd. New Zealand — Union Bank of 
Australia, Ltd. India, China and Japan — Mercantile Bank of India, Ltd. 
West Indies— CJolonial Bank. Paris — Credit Lyonnais. Lyons — Credit 
Lyonnais. Agents in Canada for the Ck)lonial Bank, London, and West 
Indies . 

i^Issues Circular Notes for Travellers available in all parts of the 
World. Drafts on South Africa and West Indies may be obtained at the 
Bank's Branches. 



The Canadian Bank 
of Commerce 

PAID UP CAPITAL, $10,000,000 REST $4,500,000 

Head Office: TORONTO 



B. E. WALKER, General Manager 

ALEX. LAIRD, Ass't Gen'l Manager. 



Branches throughout Canada and in the United States and 
England, including the following: 



Atlin 


Nelson 


Seattle 


Cobalt 


New Glasgow 


Skagway 


Cranbrook 


Ottawa 


Springhill 


Dawson 


Parry Sound 


Sydney 


Fernie 


Penticton 


Toronto 


Greenwood 


Port Arthur 


Vancouver 


Halifax 


Portland, Ore. 


Victoria 


Ladysmith 


Princeton 


White Horse 


Montreal 


San Francisco 


Winnipeg 


Nanaimo 


Sault Ste. Marie 





NEW YORK: 16 Exchange Place 
LONDON, Engrland: 60 Lombapd St., E.C. 

A branch has recently been opened at COBALT, in^^the 
newly-discovered silver mining camp in New Ontario. 



STANLEIV 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF SURVEYING AND DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS IN THE WORLD. MAKERS TO 
THE CANADIAN QOVERNMENT. 




>• 

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Q. 
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DC 
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TELESCOPE ON TOP 



telescope at side 



For vertical sighting it is also most useful and accurate, as by trans- 
ferring the lines of both positions of auxiliary, two lines at right angles to 
each other are transferred down a shaft which, if produced, wiU intersect 
each other exactly xinder the centre of the instrument, and no allowance 
or calculation whatever has to be made to ascertain the centre. 



Price List post free. 



Cablegrams: "TURNSTILE, LONDON.' 



Great Turnstile, HOLBORN, LONDON, 
ENGLAND. 




SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



G.L.BERGER&SONS 

37 William Street 
BOSTON, Mass. 

Successors to BUFF & BERGER. 

SPBCIAI/TIES : 
Standard Instruments and 
Appliances for 

Mining, Subway, 
Sewer, Tunnel, 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

Underground Work. 



GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM 

THE SHORT FAVORITE ROUTE 

BETWEEN Ottawa and Montreal 

Sunday Train Both Directions 
PULLMAN BUFF PARLOR CARS 

QUEBEC, HALIFAX, PORTLAND 



Close Connections at 
Montreal with Trains for 
And al 

Fast THKOtroH 
Service Between 



Points EAST and SOUTH. 



OTTAWA, NEW YORK ANO BOSTON 



And all NEW ENGLAND POINTS. 

Through Buffet Sleeping Cars betweeq Ottawa and f^ew York. 

Baggage checked to all points and passed by customs in transit. 
For tickets, time tables and information, apply to nearest ticket agent of 
this company or connecting lines. 

Q. T. Bell, Gen'l Pass, and Ticket Agent. 



vlii 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Deane Triplex Power Pump combined with Gas Engine 




Such a plant 
in many 
locations 
solves the 
heretofore 
difficult 
problem of 
an indepen- 
dent water 
supply. 



The JOHN McDOUGALL Caledonian Iron Works Go. Limited. 

MOISITREIAL. 
BUILDERS FOR CANADA. Write for Catalogue B. I. 



SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL SCIENCE 

TORONTO 

Established - . . . . 1878 

THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENCINEERINC 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 




Departments of Instruction: 

1 — Civil Engineering. 4 — Architecture. 

2 — Mining Engineering. .5— Analytical and Applied 

3 — Mechanical and Electrical Chemistry. 

Engineering. 6 — Chemical Engineering. 

Special attention is directed to the facilities possessed by the school 
for giving instruction in Mining Kngineering. 

Laboratokies: 

1 — Chemical. 3 — Milling and 4 — Steam. 6 — Electrical. 

2 — Assaying Ore Treatment 5 — Meteorological 7 — Testing. 

A Calendar giving full information, and including a list showing the 
positions held by graduates, sent on application. 

A. T. LAING, Registrar. 



CANADIAN MINING INSTITUTE 

Incorporated by Act of Parliament 1898. 

AIMS AND OBJECTS. 

(A) To promote the Arts and Sciences connected with the 
economical production of valuable minerals and metals, by 
means of meetings for the reading and discussion of technical 
papers, and the subsequent distribution of such information as 
may be gained through the medium of publications. 

(B) The establishment of a central reference library and a 
headquarters for the purpose of this organization. 

(C) To take concerted action upon such matters as affect 
the mining and metallurgical industries of the Dominion of Canada. 

(D) To encourage and promote these industries by all law- 
ful and honourable means. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members shall be persons engaged in the direction and 
operation of mines and metallurgical works, mining engineers, 
geologists, metallurgists, or chemists, and such other persons as 
the Council may see fit to elect. 

Student Members shall include persons who are qualifying 
themselves for the profession of mining or metallurgical engineer- 
ing, students in pure and applied science in any technical school 
in the Dominion, and such other persons, up to the age of 25 
years, who shall be engaged as apprentices or assistants in mining, 
metallurgical or geological work, or who may desire to participate 
in the benefits of the meetings, library and publications of the 
Institute. Student members shall be eligible for election as 
Members ofter the age of 25 years. 

SUBSCRIPTION. 

Member's yearly, subscription $10.00 

Student Member's do 2 . 00 

PDBLICATIONS . 

Vol. 1. 1898, 66 pp., out of print Vol. V, 1902, 700 pp., bound. 

Vol. II, 1899, 285 pp., bound red cloth Vol. VI. 190.3, 520 pp., bound. 
Vol. Ill, 1 900, 270 pp., bound red cloth Vol. VII, 1904, 530 pp., bound. 
Vol.IV, 1901.333 pp., bound. oupp,uou u. 

Membership in the Canadian Mining Institute is open to 
everyone interested in promoting the profession and industry of 
mining without qualification or restrictions. 

Forms of application for membership, and copies of the 
Journal of the Institute, etc., may be obtained upon application to 

H. MORTIMER-LAMB, Secretary, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



ix 



FLORY HOISTING ENGINES 



STEAM AND 



LECTRIC 



Especially designed for Mines, Quarries and Contractors work. Such 
as Pile Driving, Bridge Building, and general Construction work. 

The FLORY CABLEWAY SYSIEM is Superior to any on the Marltet 

Slate Mining and 
Worl<ing Machinery. 

SALES AGENTS : 

I. MATHESON & CO., 

New Glasgow; N. S. 

W. H C. MUSSEN & CO.; 

Montreal, Que. 





ASK FOR OUR CATALOGUES. 



S. Flory Mfg. Co. 

and Works: BANGOR, Pa, U.S.A. 



UNITED STATES 



STEEL PRODUCTS EXPORT CO. 



NEW YORK: Battery Park Bidg. MONTREAL! Bank of Ottawa Bidg. 

IRON AND STEEL WIRE ROPE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

wire: rope: tramways 

AND 



cable: hoist-conveiyors 
RUBBER AND PAPER INSULATED COPPER WIRE AND CABLES 



WRITE FOR OUR CATALOGUES 




MORRIS MACHINE WORKS 

BALDWINSVILLE, N.Y. 

Centrifugral Pumping: Machinery for 
Various industrial Purposes. 

We are building a special solid steel lined 
pump for handling tailings or slimes in gold 
mining. Estimates furnished upon appHca- 
tion for pumping outfits for special purposes. 
Write for catalogue. 

New York office— 39-41 Cortlandt St. 

AGENCIES 

Henion & Hubbell, 61-69 North JeflFerson Street, Chicago 111 
Harron, Rickard & McCone, San Francisco, Cal. ^immerman-Wells-Brown Co., Portland Oregon, 

H. W. Petrie, Toronto, Ont. 



X 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Dan'l Smith 
President. 



C. E. Macpbebsom 
Sec.-Treas. 



For Miners 
Pit-Sinkers 



ELECTRIC 



0NTARI© P0WDER QO. Ltd. 

I 15 Brock Street, KINGSTON, ONT. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

DYNAMITE, EXPLOSIVES 

BLASTING APPARATUS, FUSE, CAPS, &,c. 



Fob Qdarrtmen 
Contractors 



ELECTRIC BLASTING APPARATUS 




Adapted for Firing all kinds of 
Explosives used in Blasting:. 



Victor Electric Platinum Fuses. 

Superior to all others for exploding any make of dynamite or blasting powder 
Each Fuse Folded separately and packed in neat paper boxes of 50 each. All tested 
and warranted. Single and double strength with any length of wires. 

Blasting Machines. 

The strongest and most powerful machines ever made for Electric Blasting, 
They are especially adapted for submarine blasting, large railroad quarrying, and 
mining works. 

Victor Blasting Machine. 

Fires 5 to 8 holes ; weighs 15 lbs.; adapted for prospecting, etc. 

Insulated Wires and Tapes, Blasting Caps, Fuse, etc. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 
MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

MACBETH FUSE WORKS 

POMPTON LAKES, NEW JERSEY. 




HAMILTON POWDER COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Explosives 

Office : 4 Hospital Street, Montreal. Branch Offices Throughout Canada. 



W. T. RODDEN, Managing Director. 



J. F. JOHNSON, Secretary-Treasurer. 



STANDARD EXPLOSIVES 



LIMI 



Manufacturers of High Explosives, and Dealers 
in Blasting Powder, Safety Fuse Detonators, 
Batteries, Electrical Fuses, etc. 



OFFICE: WORKS: 
Board of Trade Building, Montreal. lie Perrot, near Vaudreuil, P.Q. 



THE 'CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xi 




HOW YOU AN INCREASE 
YOUR ORE VALUES 



If your ore concentrates contain 
iron pyrites, our magnetic Separator 
will extract the iron, thus making the 
concentrates much more valuable. 
Send us a sample of your ore, and 
we will test some gratis. 

We want to send you. catalog 
"H" Ask for it. 



United Iron Works 
Company — 

Sprins:field, Mo., U.S.A. 



Longest Ser-Vice Mo^l Economical 

= CHROME STEEL 

SHOES AND DIES 

(hydraulic compressed) 
FOR STAMP MILLS 




CANDA SELF-LOCKING CAMS 
TAPPETS: BOSSHEADS 

CAMS SHAFTS: STAMP STEMS 



Send for lUustrated 
Pamphlet 
' Chrome Steel Stamp" 
Mill Parts. 





THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL 

For Reduction of all classes of Ore 




PATEflTED Ifl TKE FOLLOWING COUNTRIES: 

DOMINION OF CANADA 



United^States 
Mexico 
New Zealand 
Japan 
Russia 



Great Britain 

South African Colonies 

Germany 

New South Wales 

Victoria 



British India 
Tasmania 
Queensland 
South Australia 
West Australia 



A few reasons why the ELSPASS MILL is displacing 
all other crushers : 

Practically no slimes ; more lineal feet screen surface 
than any other mill ; less horse-power to operate than 
any other mill of the same capacity ; cost of erection 
very low ; occupies very little space ; will save your free 
coarse gold in the mill without the use of mercury ; per- 
fect panning motion, die revolving and rollers remaining 
stationary ; 30 to 60 tons of ore treated per day ; costs 
very little for repairs. 



The Elspass Mill. 



Adopted by the U.S. Government and installed in the 
new mint at Denver. 



Liberal Discount to Supply Houses. 



CANADA FOUNDRY CO., TORONTO 

Manufactupeps fop the Canadian Trade. 

THE ELSPASS ROLLER QUARTZ MILL AND MFC. CO., %VLo^fs!;.° 



Address for terms and particulars 



XII 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



PUMPING MACHINERY 

FOR MINES AND WATERWORKS 




3 SETS OF GEARED THREE-THROW HORIZONTAL RAM PUMPS 

9 RAMS EACH 10 INS. DIAMETER X 20 INS. STROKE. 



Hathorn Davey & Co. Ltd. 



LEEDS, ENGLAND, 



Sole Canadian 
Representatives 



PEACOCK BROTHERS 



Canada Life Buildingr 
IMONTREAL. 



ROBERT MEREDITH & CO. 

57 St. Francois Xavier St., MONTREAL 

Stock Brokers. Dealers in Mining and Indus- 
trial Shares. Companies Formed and Floated. 

Private Wire Connection with 

ZIMMERMANN & FORSHAY, New York. 



ARE YOU CONFRONTED WITH A DIF- 
FICULT ORE-SEPARATING PROBLEM? 

THE WETHERILL MAGNETIC SEPARATING PROCESS 

MAr PROVE THE SOLUTION. 

For information and for Illustrated Phamphlet, apply to 

WEfHERILL SEPARATING CO., 52 BROiowAY, New York. 

GOLD MEDAL awarded at the WORLD'S FAIR, ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Mfg. Agents for Canada, ROBERT GARDNER & SON, Montreal. P Q. 



Blaisdell Cyanide Vat Excavating and Distributing Macliinery 

Blaisdell Machinery solves the problem of abolishing unskilled labour from Cyanide Plants, and provides the final 
link for a complete mcch.inical method of handling ore between the mine and the dump, and effects a saving of from 50 
per cent, to 90 per cent,, in operative expenses. 

THE JOHN McDOUGALL CALEDONIAN IRON WORKS CO. Ltd., Montreal 

Sole Manufacturers in Canada of this machinery under Canadian Patents No. 81,954 and No. 8G,862. Send for Catalo^-ue. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Xlll 



THE CROW'S NEST PASS COAL 

CO., LIMITED. 




OFFICES 

MANNING ARCADE, TORONTO. 
FERNIE, BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Gold Medal — Coal and Coke — Lewis & Clark Exposition 1905. 

Silver Medal — Coal and Coke — Paris Universal Exposition 1900. 

Mines and Coke Ovens at Fernie, Coal Creek Michel and 
Carbonado. 

Annual Capacity of Mines 2,000,000 tons. Coke Ovens 
500,000 tons. 



We are shipping domestic coal to points in Manitoba, Al- 
berta, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Montana, Washington 
and Idaho, a territory of over 400,000 square miles, and WE 
ARE GIVING SATISFACTION. 

We are shipping steam coal from Winnipeg to the Pacific 
Coast, and not only is it used in that vast area by the Railways 
and the largest firms, but also by the Great Northern Steamship 
Company's liners plying between Seattle and the Orient. 

Our Michel Blacksmith coal is used m Railway forging 
shops in Winnipeg, seven hundred miles East, and in Vancouver 
four hundred miles West. 

Ask a British Columbia smelter Superintendent what coke 
he uses and rt»hat coke gives him best satisfaction. 

OUR ANALYSES SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

R. G. DRINNAN, G. G. S. LINOSEY, 

Superintendent. General Manager. 



LUDWIG NAUEN 

Hambupg", Germany 



CONTINENTAL AGENT AND BUYER FOR 

ASBESTOS CRUDE AND FIBRE ALL GRADES 

Actinolite, Talc, Corundum 
Mica, Molybdenite, 

AND OTHER MINERALS. 



SPRIN GHILL COAL 

THE CUMBERLAND RAILWAY & COAL CO. 

Are prepared to deliver this well known 
Steam Coal at all points on the lines of 
G. T. R., C. P. R., and I. C. Railway. 

Head Office: 107 St. James St., MONTREAL 

ADDRESS, P.O. BOX 396. 



DOMINION BRIDGE CO., LTD., MONTREAL, P.Q. 

TURNTABLES, ROOF TRUSSES 
STEEL BUILDINGS 
ELECTRIC and HAND POWER CRANES 
Structural METAL WORK of all kinds 

BEAMS, CHANNELS, ANGLES, PLATES, ETC-r IN STOCK 



BRIDGES 



MILLING AND MINING MACHINERY 

Shafting, Pulleys, Gearing, Hangers, Boilers, Engines, Steam 
Pumps, Chill ed Car Wheels and Car Cast i ngs. Brass and Ir on 
Castings of Every Description. Light and Heavy Forgings. 



ALEX. FLECK LTD., Ottawa. 

I 



xiv 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Directory of Mining Engineers, Cliemists, Assayers, Etc. 



JOHN E. HARDMAN 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER 

BOOM 10 

171 ST. JAMES STREET 
MONTREAL ' 


FRITZ CIRKEL 

CONSULTING MINING ENGINEER. 

Twenty years' experience in Explora- 
tory Work and Mining in Germany, 
Eastern and Central Canada, British 
Columbia and the Pacific States. 

Examination of Mines. 
Office, 80 Stanley St., MONTREAL, Can. 


J. B. TYRRELL 

Late of tlie Geological Survey of Canada. 

MINING ENGINEER 
Dawson ------ Yukon. 

Telegraphic Address — Tyrrell, Dawson. 
Code used — Bedford McNeil's. 


MILTON L. HERSEY, M.Sc. 

Consulting Chemist of the C.P.R. 

Official Assater Appointed for Province 
OF Quebec. 

171 St. James Street, MONTREAL 

ASSAYS OF ORES. 

Chemical and Physical Tests of all 
Materials. 

mineral properties examined. 


** Cards in this space cost only 
$15 pel year." 


F. HILLE 

MINING ENGINEER 

Mines and Mineral Lands examined and 
reported on. Plans and Estimates on 
Concentrating Mills after the ICrupp- 
Bilharz system. 

PORT ARTHUR, ONT. 
Canada. 


DR. J. T. DONALD 

(Official Analyst to the Dominion Government.) 

ANALYTICAL CHEMIST & ASSAYER 

112 St. Francois-Xaviek Street 

MONTREAL. 

Analysis, Assaying, Cement Testing, 
etc. Mining Properties Examined. 

DIRECTOR OF LABORATORIES: 

R. H.D.BENN.F.c.s. 

S. DILLON-MILLS, M. Ex. 

SPECIALTIES: 

Minerals of Huronian and Laurentian 
areas. 

Twenty years' experience superintending 
furnaces and mines. 

538 Huron Street 
TORONTO - - - - ONTARIO. 


L. VOGELSTEIN & CO. 

90-96 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

REPRESENTING 

ARON HIRSCH & SOHN 
Halberstadt, Germany. 

Copper, Argentiferous and Auriferous Copper 
Ores, Mattes and Bullion, Lead, Tin, Antimony 
Spelter. 

Copper an J Brass Rolling and Tubing Mills 
in Europe. 

AGENTS OF THE 

Delamar Copper Refining Works, 
Carteret, N.J. 


H. F. E. GAMM, Mem. D.I.A.E. 

Mining Engineer. 

Gen. MEnager, Ontario Mining & Smelting Co. 

Mines examined. Mills designed. 
Machinery installed. 

Specialties: Lead, Silver, Copper, Gold. 
Rare Metals Wanted. 

Bannockburn. Ont, 

Rutherford, New Jersey. 

No. 1418 Flatiron BuUding, N.Y. City. 


HANBURY A. BUDDEN 

ADVOCATE PATENT AGENT 
NEW YORK LIFE BUILDING, MONTREAL 

CABLE ADDRESS : BREVET, MONTREAL 


WM. BLAKEMORE 

MINING 
ENGINEER 

Consultation. Reports. Development. 

NELSON - B.C. 


A. W. ROBINSON, M. Am. Soc. C.E., M: Am. Soc. M.E. - 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER 

Dredging Machinery. Plant for Public Works. Gold Dredges. 

14 PHILLIPS SQUARE, MONTREAL, 
CANADA. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



XV 





CHEAPE^^^ 


Dr. Goldschmidt's ^h'iZ'ISk 

"THERMIT" Steel for Repair Work, Welding of 
Street Rails, Shafting and Machinery. 

"TITAN THERMIT" for foundry work. 

"NOVO" AIR HARDENING STEEL 

iwist uruis, iviiuing i^utters, ijianKs. 

High Speed and Durability. 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Sole Agent for Canada, 
334 St. James Street, Montreal. 


1 lb. of Coal per h.p. hour. Cost i to J cent per horse-power 
hour. Built for any capacity required. No boOer or Gas 
Holder required. Automatic Work. Contracts undertaken for 
complete Power Plants and results guaranteed. 

DR. OSCAR NAGLE, CHEMICAL ENGINEER 

90-96 Wall Street, NEW YORK CITY. 


HENHY BATH & SON, Brokers. 

LONDON, LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA 

AH description METALS, MATTES, ETC. 

Warehouses. LIVERPOOL and SWANSEA. 
Warrants issued under their Special Act of Parliament. 

NITRATE OF SODA s.V»'^'..'\r.%%. 


" THIS SPACE TO LET" 


\ OLDEST EXPERTS IN 

% Molybdenite, 

X ^<5^^ X Wolframite, 

%<?^^Chrome Ore, 

Tale, 

Mica, XVV^X^**"^'* 
Barytes, \Ne.VfvX^® 
Graphite, 

Blende, \' C*^,^^' \^"'* 
Corundum, \ > J»\ 
Fluorspar, W\^\ - 
Feldspar. \%%^ \ ^ 

LARGEST BUYERS, O X 
BEST FIGURES, ^ 
ADVANCES ON SHIPMENTS, ^ X 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. "^O^^ X. 

Cables— Blackwell, Liverpool, ABC ^J^k 
Code, Moreing & Neal, Mining and \j> 
General Code, Lieber's Code and Mul- <f 
ler's Code. 

ESTABLISHED BY GEO. G. BLACKWELL, 1869. 


MAJOR DAVID BEAMES, 

Late LS.C, and of Berl^l^ampstead, England. 

If the above will communicate with C. J. Walker's 
Advertising Agency, 24 Coleman Street, London, 
England, he may hear of something to his advantage 


LEiDoux 8c CO. '^i°iVo;r' 

SAMPLE AND ASSAV ORES AND METALS 

Independent Ore Sampling Works at the Port of New York. Only two 
such on the Atlantic seaboard. 

We are not Dealers or Refiners, but receive Consignments, Weigh, Sample 
and Assay them, selling to the highest bidders, obtaining adyances when 
desired, and the buyers of two continents pay the highest market price, in 
New York Funds, cash against our certificates. 

Mines Examined and Sampled. Also Analyse everything. 


THE COBALT SILVER DISTRICT 

LANDS, MINES AND 
STOCK FOR SALE 

The Coleman Development Co., Ltd. 

(No Personal Liability) Haileybury, P.O. 



NICKEL 

THK CANADIAN COPPKR COMPANY. 

NICKEL FOR NICKEL STEEL 

THE ORFORD COPPER COMPANY. 



WRITE US FOR PARTICULARS AND PRICES 

General Offices: 43 Exchangee Piace, NEW YORK. 



xvi 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



^L/CE TltAMWAY 




Patent Automatic Aerial Tramway 



ON 



MAN 



(RIBLET SYSTEM) 

With this system 



Upper Terminal, Alice Tramway. 



can handle 1600 TONS 
per day. 

COST OF OPERATION : ONE MAN'S WAGES. 
More Riblet Tramways built last year than all others combined. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES AND SPECIFICATIONS. 

RIBLET TRAMWAY CO. 

SPOKANE, WASH., U S.A. NELSON, B.C., CANADA 



H 



BENNETT FUSE 



CROWN 




BRAND 



Manufactured by 



WILLIAM BENNETT, SONS & GO, 

Camborne, Cornwall, 
England 



CANADIAN OFFICE: 

BENNETT FUSE CO., YATES ST., 

VICTORIA, B.C. 



AND AGENCIES 
THROUGHOUT 
THE DOMINION 




CORRUC/\TED 

METALLIC 

PACKING 

for joints of any 
Size or Shape 

Newton & 
Nicholson 

TYNE DOCK 

CORRUGATED 

METALLIC 

PACKING 

WORKS; 

South 
Shields, 

ENGLAND. 

Telegraqhic 
Address : 

"CORRUGATE," 
Tyne Dock. 



FORTY-SIXTH YEAR. 



66 PAGES : WEEKLY : ILLUSTRATED. 



INDISPENSABLE TO MINING MEN 



$3 PER YEAR POSTPAID. 

SEND FOR SAMPLE COPY. 

Mining and Scientific Press 

330 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAX- 



ENLARGED FACILITIES. 

' Our new plant at St. Catherines is now ready to turn out Boilers. With a view to 
rapid and economical production no expense has been spared in equipping the new 
plant which is modern and complete in every particular. We are consequently in a 
position to handle a greatly increased volume of Boiler business and to handle it with 
despatch. You are particularly requested to send us your Boiler enquiries. 

The Jenckes Machine Co., Limited. 



SALES OFFICES: 



TORONTO HALIFAX 
ROSSLAND VANCOUVER 



EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 
64 LANSDOWNE ST., SHERBROOKE, QUE. 



PLANTS: 



SHERBROOKE, QUE. 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xvii 



HOISTING ENGINES 
FOR DEEP MINES 




Sullivan Corliss Geared Hoist, built for a 
Chihuahua, Mexico Company. Hoists of this 
type are built in any desired capacity and for 
any speed. 




Sullivan Hoists are furnished for any 
requirements of speed, depth and load, 
and to meet any conditions of mining 
service. 

They are the result ot our experience 
of 25 years in design and manufacture, 
and embody numerous features original 
with this company, which render them 
superior to other makes. 



These hoists are provided with 
the Sullivan automatic interlock- 
ing throttle closing device and 
brake control, thus absolutely 
preventing an overwind. 

Catalogue 42. 



SPECIFICATIONS ON REQUEST 



Sullivan Corliss direct acting Hoist, built for the 
Centennial Copper Co., Calumet, Mich. Engines, 36 x 
60 inches. Drum 15 ft. diameter, by 15 ft. long, Horse- 
power, 2,500, Speed, 4,000 ft. per minute from 5,000 
ft. depth. 



Air Compressors 
Rock Drills 
Diamond Drills 



Sullivan Machinery Co 



CLAREMONT, N. H. 
NEW YORK 
PITTSBURG 
KNOXVILLE 



ST. LOUIS; 
JOPLIN, MO. 
DENVER 
BUTTE 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



ELIPASO 
SALT LAKE 
PARIS. FRANCE 
JOHANNESBURG 



SPOKANE 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ROSSlAND 

MEXICO 



xviij 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



THE "JEFFREY" 
CUTS THE WORLD'S COAL 




Jeffrey Air Driven Coal Mining Machine at work in Mine of 
Westmoreland Coal Company. 



ILLUSTRATED BULLETINS ON ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES and MININC MACHINES 

MAILED FREE UPON REQUEST. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 

The Jeffrey Manufacturing Company 

COLUMBUS, OHIO, U.S.A. 



CAIMADIAIVJ AGENTS: 
A. R. Williams Machinery Co., TORONTO. Williams & Wilson, MONTREAL 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



xix 



A FINE STEAM PLANT 




"I will say without qualification that it is as fine a boiler and 
engine plant as I have ever had the pleasure of seeing for its 
size. The engine was working without heating, and absolutely 
without any noise. I wish to congratulate you on your success 
in building this class of engine, and hope that we may have 
pleasure in dealing with you again." 

The above refers to a 350 horse power Robb-Armstrong Corliss 
Engine and two 175 horse power Robb-Mumford Boilers in- 
stalled by us. 



ROBB ENGINEERING CO., Ltd,, amherst, n.s. 

AGEivj-rs 

¥¥1JLL.IA]II JUcKAY, 330 Ossington Avenue, Toronto. 

WAT$)0:v JACK A COMPANT, Bell Teleplione Building:, Montreal. 

J. F. POKT£B, 355 Carlton Street, Winnipeg. 



XX 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




Plug Driller 



Light compact and reliable. 
Will do the work of Twelve Men 
drilling by hand. 



44 



IMPERIAL " 
PNEUMATIC 

--TOOLS-- 



are convinced that our 
Plug Driller is the best on 
the market and in order that you 
may share our assurance, we are 
prepared to ship you one on 30 
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VOL. XXVI— No. 4. 



MONTREAL, APRIL, 1906. 



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Published by THE REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
Limited, P.O. Box 2187, Montreal, Canada. 

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CONTENTS. 

Editorials:— Page. 

The New Director of the Geological Survey 101 

The Mineral Production 102 

The Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mining Institute . . 103 

Papers: — 

On the Advisability of the Establishment of a Federal Depart- 
ment of Mines 105 

The Education of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers . . . 112 

The Teaching of Metallurgy in College Laboratories 121 

Mr. N. O. Daru 128 

Economical Coal Mining 128 

The Ashland Emery and Conmdum Company 128 

LeRoi Dividends \ 128 

The Atikokan Iron Mines 129 

The Mining Share Market 1 29 

Court Decisions 129 

Cobalt News 129 

Mining Incorporations 130 

Nova Scotia Mining Intelligence 130 

Chibbougamou Mining District 130 

Industrial Notes 131 

Mining Notes ] . 132 

Company Meetings & Reports 133 

Mining Men and Affairs 134 

Important Mining Suit ] . 136 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



The readers of the Review will be pleased to learn 
that Mr. H. Mortimer-Lamb, Secretary of the Canadian 
Mining Institute and Editor of the Review, is making 
steady, if not rapid, progress towards recovery. It 
is expected that he will soon be able to resume his 
duties. 



THE NEW DIRECTOR OF THE GEOLOGICAL 
SURVEY. 



The directorship of the Geological Survey of Canada, 
which has been vacant since the death of Dr. Dawson, 
five years ago, has just been filled by the promotion 
of Mr. A. P. Low, B.A.Sc, F.R.G.S. Mr. Low is a 
native of Montreal and was educated at the Montreal 
High School and McGill University. From the latter 
institution he received the degree of Bachelor of Ap- 
plied Science in the year 1882, graduating with first 
rank honours. He was appointed to the staff of the 
Canadian Geological Survey in 1882, and was promoted 




Mr. A. P. Low, B.A.Sc, F.R.G.S. 

to the rank of geologist in 1891. After making several 
surveys in eastern and northern Quebec, Mr. Low 
was engaged for more than six years in exploring the 
Labrador Peninsula, on the resources of which he is 
the recognized authority. In 1896 he received the 
McGill Memorial Prize from the Royal Geographical 
Society, in acknowledgment of the far reaching value 
of his services. In 1897 he accompanied the " Diana" 
scientific expedition to Hudson's Bay, and in 1903 
and 1904 commanded the "Neptune" on a similar 
expedition to Baffin's Land, and other parts of the 
far North. He is a Fellow of the Geological Societv 
of America, and of the Royal Geographical Society 



102 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



of England, and a member of many other learned 
societies. Mr. Low, in addition to his high attain- 
ments as a geologist, is marked by a strong sense of 
the practical utility of his profession, and he is quite 
au fait with mining interests of the day. His splendid 
personality, as well as the qualifications already men- 
tioned augurs well for his directorship. The Review 
extends its congratulations both to Mr. Low upon the 
important position to which he has attained, and to 
his Department on the appointment of so able a head. 



MINERAL PRODUCTION. 



The statistics of the Mineral Production of Canada 
for 1905, compiled by Mr. E. D. Ingall, with the assis- 
tance of Mr. J. McLeish, which forms a part of the 
Summary Report of the Geological Survey, has just 
appeared in separate form. Increased production 
is the dominant feature of this valuable report. The 
total mineral production for the year amounts to 
$68,574,707, against $60,343,165 for the year previous. 
This is an increase of about 14 per cent. The increase 
too applies to all products except petroleum, natural 
cement, and gold from the Yukon. In the last named 
case there has been a falling off in the output of placer 
gold amounting to more than $2,000,000. This decline 
is attributable to lack of mining facilities for working 
at depths and not to exhaustion of the ore deposits. 

The following are the percentage ratios of the prin- 
cipal minerals: — 



Coal 2.5.77% 

Gold 21.14% 

Nickel 11.02% 

Copper 10.83% 

Asbestos 2.19% 

Petroleum 1.24% 

Brick, Stone and Lime 8.62% 

Silver 5.26% 

Lead 3.84% 

Cement 2.81% 

Pig Iron from Canadian Ores 1 . 53% 



All the coal mining districts show an increase, the 
aggregate of the whole being about $1,000,000.00, or 
6 per cent. Approximately 60 per cent, of the coal 
mined in Canada comes from Nova Scotia, 20 per cent, 
from British Columbia, 20 per cent, from Alberta, 
Saskatchewan and the Yukon Territory. It has the 
largest output, according to value, of any single 
mineral mined in Canada, and added to the metals, 
makes up 80 per cent, of the total production. 

The output of silver has increased $1,558,862, or 
more than 50 per cent, over the previous year. This 
is due to the large development of silver mining at 
Cobalt, and to the splendid results that have been 
obtained. The extraordinary richness of the ore, 
and the comparatively small amount of development 
necessary, as well as the low cost of mining, are im- 
portant features of this unique mining camp. " Car- 
loads of ore, reported at from $60,000.00 to $100,000.00 
in value, have not been unusual." 

The newly discovered deposits at Windy Arm, 
Lake Tagish, on the boundary between British Col- 
umbia and the Yukon Territory, give promise of a 
further increase in the supply of silver during the 
present year. 

The copper production of Canada lias increased 
during the past year by more than four and a half 
million pounds. This with the increased price of 
that metal, has given an increase in vahu? of more 



than two million dollars. The copper production 
has increased in each of the provinces in which copper 
mining is carried on, namely, British Columbia, Ontario 
and Quebec. The output of the mines of the Boundary 
District alone is estimated to have increased by one 
million of dollars during the past year. 

The total amount of pig iron manufactured in Canada 
during 1905 was 527,932 tons, valued at $6,492,972.00, 
as compared with 303,454 tons, valued at $3,582,001.00 
in 1904. Of this amount less than one sixth is yet 
made from Canadian ores. However, 116,779 tons 
of iron ore was exported from Canada during the year. 
The Government bounty paid for pig manufac- 
tured from Canadian ores in 1905 amounted to $1,900,- 
206.00. 

Aided by bounties to the amount of $334,224.00 
the output of lead increased during 1905 by nearly 
50 per cent, or more than a million dollars. Over 
90 per cent, of this output has been exported to foreign 
countries. The lead refinery, established two years 
ago at Trail, and the Corroding Works recently begun 
by the Carter White Lead Company at Montreal, 
will however eventually lead to the manufacturing 
in Canada of nearly three-fourths of the amount at 
present produced. 

The nickel production of the year amounted to 
18,876,315 pounds, valued at $7,550,526.00, as com- 
pared with 10,547,883 pounds, value $4,219,153.00, 
in 1904. Some of the ores from the Cobalt district 
contained nickel varying in amount from 4 per cent, 
to 7 per cent., but these have not yet been smelted 
and hence are not included in this output. 

Concerning zinc, Mr. Ingall writes: "The zinc ores 
of British Columbia, which were formerly regarded 
as merely detrimental constituents of the combined 
lead and zinc sulphuret ores of the province, have 
for some time been the subject of great interest on 
account of the demand which has recently arisen for 
ores of this metal. Already attention has been turned 
toward utilizing the zinc blende associated with the 
argentiferous galena of the various camps in East and 
West Kootenay. Mill practice has been altered at 
some of the mines already operating so as to give a 
satisfactory separate zinc product, and attention is 
also being turned toward the opening up of various 
claims where the large proportion of blende present 
has formerly debarred profitable work. The Daily 
News, of Nelson, B.C., estimates a production for the 
province of over 13,000 tons with an average content 
of 42 per cent, of this metal. 

The recently erected smelter at Frank in Southern 
Alberta, owned by the Canadian Metal Company, 
will insure the utilization of much of the ore in the 
country. The production of zinc ores in this province 
is likely to increase very largely in the future should 
the active demand continue, as their existence in 
quantity is already known at very many places. 

The whole question of supply and utilization of 
those ores is now under investigation by a commission 
instituted by the Federal Government. 

The asbestos industry shows a substantial advance 
over the output of previous years. The production 
is classified as follows: — 

Tons. $ 

Crude 3,768 472,859 

Mill stock 46,902 1,013,500 

Total asbestos 50,670 1,486,359 

Asbestic 17,594 16,900 

Total i)iod nets 68,264 1,503,259 

Exports of asbostus according to Customs returns were 
47.031 tons, valued at $1,386,115. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



103 



A further increase in the production of asbestos is 
to be looked for when the recently discovered deposits 
in the Lake Chibogamoo district shall have been utilized 

The natural rock cement production has declined 
markedly during the past year, while that of Portland 
cement has greatly increased. There is now manu- 
factured about 1,346,548 barrels, but 718,275 barrels 
■are yet imported. The present value in Portland 
cement is about $1.30 per barrel. There are nine 
factories operating in Ontario, two in Quebec, one in 
Nova Scotia, and one in British Columbia. The list 
of exports, appended to this report, indicate that there 
are exported from Canada, in the raw state, over 
five million dollars worth of copper, SI, 386,1 15.00 
worth of asbestos and $2,777,218.00 worth of silver 
in the ore. 



THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CANADIAN 
MINING INSTITUTE. 



The eighth annual meeting of the Canadian Mining 
Institute was held in the rooms of the Chateau Fron- 
tenac on March 7th., 8th., and 9th., 1906. Deep 
regret was felt at the absence, through illness, of the 
Secretary. Mr. H. Mortimer-Lamb, whose inability to 
attend the meeting was much deplored. 

At the opening session, Wednesday, March 7th, 
at 10.30 a.m., the annual report of the Council was 
read, together with the financial statement for the 
year. A discussion arose over the comparative state- 
ment of the expenditures of the two previous years, 
which the Treasurer submitted as usual, in connection 
with his annual report. After discussion by Mr. 
Coste, Mr. Brown, and one or two other members, it 
was decided to submit the comparative statement 
also to the auditors before inserting it in the annual 
report. 

The removal of the headcjuarters of the Institute to 
the rooms rented from the Canadian Society of Civil 
Engineers, was discussed by Mr. Smith, Dr. Barlow, 
Mr. Hopper and Dr. Porter, and it was explained that 
the new quarters were more commodious and better 
situated than those formerly occupied, and that' they also 
gave the Institute the use of the lecture hall and lilDrary 
of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers. The 
President then delivered his annual address: Mem- 
bers of the Institute from other provinces were grace- 
fully welcomed to the ancient capital; the historic 
associations centering around the City of Quebec, the 
noble work of the heroic pioneers of New France, and 
the history of the early geological research in the dis- 
trict of Quebec, and the early development of mining, 
especially in the district of the St. Maurice, were 
vividly recalled; the industrial mining developments 
of the Province, and the promise of a brilliant future 
were eloquently portrayed. The President's address 
provoked much enthusiasm. 

A vote of thanks was unanimously passed by the 
Institute to Dr. Porter for his services gratuitously 
given in taking up the work of Secretary for a few 
weeks previous to the meeting, which was rendered 
necessary by the regrettable illness of its able secretary, 
Mr. H. Mortimer-Lamb. 

The following gentlemen were appointed scrutineers: 
Messrs. A. P. Low, Chairman, F. Hobart, and J. J. 
Penhale, and special instructions were issued to the 
scrutineers regarding the qualification of voters and 
the recognition of ballots. 



The second session met on Wednesday at 3 p.m., 
the president, Mr. Smith, in the chair. The first paper 
to be presented was that by Mr. Ingall on the subject 
of "The Mineral Production of Canada". This paper, 
owing to its wide .interest and importance, has been 
reviewed at length elsewhere in this issue. Following 
Mr. Ingall's paper, on the invitation of the president, 
Mr. W. G. Miller, Provincial Geologist for Ontario, 
added a few details regarding the mineral production 
of that province. The total mineral production of 
Ontario for the past year, had attained a value of 
$23,500,000.00, which is much in excess of any previous 
year. The nickel production — 9,503 tons — was larger 
than it has ever been before. There was also an in- 
crease of 4,525 tons in copper, while the silver from 
Cobalt, a new production, exceeded two and a half 
million ounces in round numbers. The production 
of steel was also greater than in any previous year. 

Mr. J. B. Tyrrell, Dawson City, reported for the 
Yukon. The placer gold deposits of that district are 
by no means exhausted, but certain conditions, es- 
pecially of transportation and water supply, must 
be made easier before they can be worked to the 
fullest advantage. Mr. Coste added some remarks 
pertaining to the discussion, dealing chiefly with the 
question of the utilization of the iron ores of foreign 
and domestic supply, after which Mr. J. Obalski, I. M., 
Director or the Department of Mines for the Province 
of Quebec, made some remarks on the mineral statis- 
tics of the province of Quebec for the year. 

The third paper of the session was " The Ore Deposits 
and Geology of the Sudbury District," by Mr. Hixon, 
Mr. Hixon emphasized the importance of a know- 
ledge of the geological structure to the economical 
development of the mines. In the discussion which 
followed, part was taken by Messrs. Dickson, Barlow 
and Coste. This was followed by a paper by Dr. C. 
W. Dickson, Kingston School of Mining, on "The 
Genetic Relation of Nickel-Copper Ores. " This was 
discussed by Messrs. Hixon, Hopper, Barlow, Walker, 
Adams and Coste, and in reply by Dr. Dickson. 

Mr. Obalski then presented a paper on the " Rare 
Earths in Pegmatite Veins". It was noted that within 
the mica-bearing pegmatite veins of the Province of 
Quebec, several rare minerals have been found, Ura- 
nite, Monazite, Uraninite from the Villeneuve Mine, 
Samarskite and Fergusonite from the Maisonneuve, 
with Clevite from the Pied des Monts, and Orthite 
and AUanite from Lake St. John. Several of these 
are important as containing radium or as indications 
of tin. The meeting then adjourned. 

At the evening meeting Dr. Adams occupied the 
chair, owing to the President's absence on Legislative 
duties. Mr. J. E. Hardman, M. E., then delivered 
an illustrated address on "The Chibogamoo Mining 
District", in which the history of the important de- 
velopments which have recently taken place in that 
district was interestingly sketched. Mr. Low then 
presented a summary of the Geological Report, which 
is reviewed on another page of this journal. Mr. 
Obalski paid high tribute to Mr. Low's services to 
mining interests in the Chibogamoo district, after 
which he presented a paper entitled " Probabilite de 
Trouver des Mines au Nord de la Province de Quebec". 
Reference was made to the probability of large mineral 
development throughout the Huronian belt in the 
Northern part of the province of Quebec, from Chibo- 
gamoo to Lake Temiskaming. Following this paper 
Mr. Obalski read a paper by Monsieur Armand Mos- 
covici, " Notes sur un Depot de Pyrrhotine Nickelifere 
sur une Pointe appelee " Malachite Pointe. " The 



104 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



resemblance of nickeliferous sulphides found on the 
shore of lake Chibogamoo to similar ores at Sudbury, 
was pointed out. One analysis of these by Mr. Hersey 
yielded 12.03% copper. 39% nickel, with traces of 
cobalt. 

Following this paper there was a discussion, of the 
preceding papers, in which Messrs. Hardman, Dickson, 
and Low took part, and remarks were added by the 
chairman. 

An important paper by Mr. Lamb, on '"The Ad- 
visability of the Establishment of a Federal Depart- 
ment of Mines," was then presented by the chairman, 
and one by Mr. J. B. Tyrrell, on the same subject. 

In the discussion which followed these papers, part 
was taken by Major Leckie, Mr. Ingall, Mr. Hardman, 
Mr. Miller, and Mr. Low, as well as the chairman. 
On motion of Major Leckie, seconded by Mr. Tyrrell, 
the President of the Institute was requested to appoint 
a committee to urge upon the Government the desira- 
bility of establishing a Department of Mines, and cer- 
tain other measures relative to the mining interests 
of Canada. 

The fourth session of the Institute opened on March 
8th., at 10 a.m., the president in the chair. The 
comparative statement of the Treasurer, since audited 
was read, and the report was then adopted. 

The advisability of having the discussions of papers 
promptly reported, that is, within at most, one day's 
time, was suggested by Professor Walker. Dr. Porter 
replying for the secretary said it could easily be done 
by spending more money on reporting, and if the 
meeting desired it he would bring it to the attention 
of Mr. Lamb, before next meeting. The proposal 
was favorably received. A discussion of the desirabi- 
lity of the unification of mining laws was introduced 
by Dr. Porter. The question was referred to the com- 
mittee to be appointed to wait upon the Government, 
as already mentioned. In the discussion of this sub- 
ject Mr. Miller, Major Leckie, Dr. Porter and the 
President took part. 

Mr. D. B. Dowling, B. A., Sc., Geological Survey 
Department, then presented a paper entitled "Notes 
on the Utilization of Poorer Grades of Coal Slack", in 
which methods of utilizing to the best advantage the 
lignites and poor coal of the West, were discussed. 
Further discussion on the subject of this interesting 
paper was carried on by Messrs. Leckie, Porter, Ingall 
and Smith. 

Through the President, the Hon. Mr. Brodeur, 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries, extended an invita- 
tion to the Institute to an excursion upon the St. 
Lawrence, in the icebreaking steamer " Montcalm. " 
A trip was made as far down the river as Montmo- 
renci, and thence up to Cap Rouge. The local com- 
mittee provided luncheon on board, and a most enjoy- 
able afternoon was thus spent, the party being happily 
augmented by a number of ladies and gentlemen from 
Quebec. 

The annual dinner was held in the banqueting room 
of the Chateau Frontenac, and about sixty members 
were present. The guests were: His Honour, Sir Louis 
Jctte, K.C.M.G., The Lieutenant Governor of Quebec; 
The Hon. Mr. Jean Prevost, the Provincial Minister of 
Mines; Mr. George Garneau, Mayor of Quebec; Dr. 
James Douglas, of New York; Past President of the 
American Institut(; of Mining Engineers; Major Shep- 
herd and Mr. White. A number of other gentlemen 
were invited, but were unable to be present. 

The toasts were: The King, proposed by the Chair; 
the JVe.sideiit of the United States, proj)osed by the 



Chair; the Lieutenant Governor, proposed by the 
Chair and replied to by Sir Louis Jette; the Department 
of Mines of the Province of Quebec, proposed by the 
Chair and replied to by the Hon. Mr. Prevost; the City 
of Quebec, proposed by the Chair and replied to by 
the Mayor, Mr. Garneau; the Mineral Industry, pro- 
posed by Dr. Adams and replied to by Mr. Hobart 
and Mr. Hixon; Our Guests, proposed by Dr. Porter 
and replied to by Dr. Douglas; the President, proposed 
by Mr. Hardman and replied to by Mr. Smith. 

The menu was as follows, the cards being of asbestos 
paper in recognition of the importance of that industry 
in the Province: — 



MENU. 



Hors D'oeuvre. ' 
Malpecque Oysters. 

Clear Green Turtle au Madore. 



Fillet of Sole a la Marguery. 

Boudins de Votaille a la Perigore. 
Broiled Fresh Mushrooms on Toast. 



Larded Tenderloin of Beef Boquetere. 
Spinach aux Fleurons — Petits Pois an Beurre 
Potato Croquettes. 

Asparagus, Sauce Mousseline. 

English Snipe on Corbeille. 
Water Cress. 



Punch au Champagne. 
Salade Panachee. 



Pudding Glacee Nesselrode. 
Petits fours assortis — Desert Caf^ Noir. 

Sherry — Hock — Claret — Champagne. 

In addition to the formal toasts there were a number 
of songs and recitations, and the dinner was most 
successful in every respect, and was pronounced by 
all who attended to be one of the most enjoyable ever 
lield by the Institute. 

The morning session opened on March 9th, at 11 a.m., 
President Smith in the chair. A paper by Dr. F. D. 
Adams, on " The Need of a Topographical Survey of the 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



105 



Dominion of Canada, particularly with reference to the 
development of the economic resources of the Dominion," 
was presented, in the absence of the author by Mr. 
James White, Geographer of the Department of the 
Interior. The paper was discussed at considerable 
length by Messrs. White, Barlow and Ingall. 

Mr. J. W. Evans then presented a paper on " Some 
Laboratory Experiments in the Electric Smelting of 
the Titaniferous Iron Ores of Hastings County," which 
was very fully discussed, Messrs. Obalski, Smith, 
Leckie, Hixon. Coste, Porter, Hay and Groves taking part. 

The desirability of having abstracts of papers only 
presented, and thus of gaining extra time for discussion, 
was introduced by Major Leckie. Dr. Porter pointed 
out that this matter was connected with the printing of 
papers, which lay with the members, who often fail to 
realize the necessity of sending their papers to the 
secretary's office sufficiently in advance to admit of 
their publication before the meeting. At this stage 
of the programme, Mr. L. Heber Cole was presented 
with the President's gold medal, which was given for 
the best paper presented in the Student's Competition 
of last year, a paper entitled " Mine Surveying in the 
Centre Star Mine in Rossland." In making the pre- 
sentation the president expressed the hope that it 
would be an incentive to all Dr. Porter's students to 
give student papers, which are always much ap- 
preciated. Dr. Porter was also called upon, and 
speaking for the three great Canadian mining schools, 
emphasized the value of the prizes to the students of 
mining, and of the healthy interest which they evoked 
amongst the students. 

A resolution was then passed that, in the opinion of 
the Institute, the Dominion Government should enact 
legislation providing for the payment of a bounty of 
$3.00 per ton on pig iron, the product of ores raised or 
mined in Canada or Newfoundland, the act to remain 
in force for five years from the date of passage, and 
that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the 
Premier, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and to the Hon. W. S. 
Fielding, Minister of Finance. 

Also, that in the opinion of this Institute bituminous 
coal should be admitted into Central Canada free of 
duty, and used exclusively for the manufacture of coke, 
for use in blast furnaces producing pig iron, and that a 
copy of this resolution be forwarded to the Premier, 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and to the Hon. W. S. Fielding, 
Minister of Finance. 

Two papers were then presented — one, on the ques- 
tion of "The Education of Mining Engineers," by Dr. 
Porter, and one on " Laboratory Methods in .McGill 
University by Dr. Stansfield." An interesting dis- 
cussion followed these papers, in which a leading part 
was taken by Dr. James Douglas, of New York. Dr. 
Douglas emphasized the importance of the student 
giving more attention than is usual to the intellectual 
and literary side of his life. With regard to the extent 
of a purely technical education, he endorsed tlie view 
of Dr. Porter, that students should be taught the 
fundamental principles, and the use of instruments 
of precision. He considered the best general man to 
be one of very wide technical knowledge, not neces- 
sarily of too precise technical knowledge with regard 
to any one subject. 

Important part in the discussion was also taken by 
Messrs. Hixon, Daru, Ingall, and some further remarks 
were made by Dr. Porter. 

The closing session opened at 2.30 p.m., the President 
in the chair. A report of the scrutineers was sub- 
mitted, the officers elected for the ensuing year being 
as follows: — 



President. 

Mr. Geo. R. Smith, Thetford Mines, Que. 

Vice-Presidents — For One Year. 
Dr. F. D. Adams, Montreal. 
Major R. G. Lockie, Temagami P.O., Ont. 

For Two Years. 

Frederick Keffer, Greenwood, B.C. 

G. Herrick Duggan, Sydney, C.B. 

Treasurer. 

J. Stevenson Brown, Montreal. 

Secretary. 

H. Mortimer-Lamb, Montreal. 



Councillors. — For One Year. 
Mr. John Blue 
Mr. C. J. Coll 
Mr. Thos. Cantley 
Mr. Frank B. Smith 

For Two Years. 
Mr. W. H. Aldridge 
Mr. B. A. C. Crai? 
Mr. A. M. Hay 
Mr. R. T. Hopper 



Mr. J. C. Gwillim 
Mr. ,Jas. McEvoy 
Mr. W. G. Miller 
Mr. Harry Williams 



Mr. Thos. Kiddie 
Dr. A. E. Barlow 
Dr. J. Bonsall Porter 
Mr. W. D. Robb 



On motion of Mr. Coste, seconded by Mr. Hopper, a 
vote of thanks was tendered the Hon. Mr. Brodeur for 
the use of the steamer " Montcalm," and also to the 
Captain of the steamer, for his courtesy on the excur- 
sion of the previous day. 

On motion of Mr. Hopper, the Quebec M. & C. Ry. 
Company were tendered the thanks of the Institute, 
and a vote of thanks was also passed to the citizens of 
Quebec for their hospitality on the occasion of our 
visit. 

Mr. Obalski's services, as Chairman of the Dinner 
Committee, were also a subject of appreciation. 

Prof. R. W. Brock, Mining School, Kingston, then 
presented a paper on "The History of the Rossland 
District," illustrated by lantern slides, after which 
Mr. J. J. Penhale presented a set of lantern slides 
illustrating the asbestos industry, in connection with 
a paper on that subject by the President. Dr. Porter 
also showed a number of views from the mining fields 
of South Africa. This brought to a close the pro- 
ceedings of one of the largest and most successful 
meetings in the history of the Institute. 



ON THE ADVISABILITY OF THE ESTABLISH- 
MENT OF A FEDERAL DEPARTMENT 
OF MINES.* 

By H. Mortimer Lamb. 



HISTORY OF THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA IN 
ITS RELATION TO THE MINING INDUSTRY. 

So long ago as 1832 a petition praying for the estab- 
lishment and maintenance of a Geological Survey of 
old Canada, was presented to the House of Assembly. 
But although the recommendation received the en- 
dorsement of Sir John Colborne, then Lieutenant 
Governor of Upper Canada, it was not even considered 



* This paper was left in an unfinished condition by Mr. Mor- 
timer Lamb, who was taken seriously ill shortly before the meet- 
ing of the Institute at which it was to be read, at Mr. Lamb's 
request it was revised and completed by Dr. Frank D. Adams. 



106 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



by the Legislative Committee to which the matter 
was referred. Subsequent petitions met the same 
fate; until in 1841, the united parliaments, under 
the administration of Lord Sydenham, voted the sum 
of £1,500 sterling for survey purposes. In this year, 
Sir William E. Logan, (then Mr. Logan), who was 
born in the City of Montreal in the year 1798 and had 
already won for himself a considerable reputation in 
Great Britain, for his admirable geological work in 
South Wales, and his important discovery whereby 
the question of the origin of coal was established in 
favor of the theory of growth in situ, came to Canada 
on a visit to his brother residing in Montreal, and 
impressed doubtless with the great opportunities so 
new and vast a country offered for original research, 
signified in a letter written at this time his intention, 
"provided he could make the necessary business 
arrangements," of offering himself as a candidate to 
undertake the geological survey of Canada; "*and." 
he wrote, "if I once begin it will not be my fault if 
it does not go ahead." Lord Sydenham while riding 
near Kingston was thrown from his horse and died 
from the injuries which he sustained. He was suc- 
ceeded by Sir Charles Bagot, who after referring the 
matter of the appointment of a geologist to Lord 
Stanley, then Secretary of State, for the Colonies, 
offered the position, on the strong recommendations 
of such distinguished British scientists as De la Beche, 
Murchison, Sedgewick and Buckland, to Logan in 
the spring of 1842, and in August of the same year he 
entered upon his duties, but for several months his 
services were gratuitously performed. The actual 
institution of the survey may then be said to date 
from the 1st of May, 1843. Mr. Logan's first assistant 
was Mr. Alexander Murray, (afterwards C.M.G., who 
subsequently became Director of the Survey of New- 
foundland). It may here be noted that from the 
beginning, great stress was laid on the advantage 
likely to accrue in the direction of mineral development 
in Canada as a result of systematised geological inves- 
tigation. This was in fact, the chief argument advan- 
ced by the petitioners to Parliament urging the estab- 
lishment of the Survey; it was the view taken by Lord 
Sydenham in his support of the measure; and Logan 
himself as is evident from the opinions expressed both 
in his published letters and in his official reports, and 
equally so by his years of useful work, never ceased 
to regard this as the paramount aim and object of 
his endeavors. Thus in a letter addressed to Sir 
Henry De la Beche, in 1843, he wrote, "The main 
object of the investigation is no doubt to determine 
the mineral riches of the colony," and again in his 
evidence before the Parliamentary Committee on the 
Geological Survey in 1855, he said "The object of 
the survey is to ascertain the mineral resources of the 
country, and this is kept steadily in view. Whatever 
new scientific facts have resulted from it, have come 
out in the course of what I conceive to be economic 
researches carried on in a scientific way. . . My whole 
connection with geology is of a practical character." 
In short, as is somewhere stated. Sir William Logan 
belonged to that school of geologists whose motto is 
"Facts, then theories." And the reports for which 
he was responsible attest the accuracy of this claim. 
For example, in the " Report of Progress of the Geo- 
logical Survey from its commencement to 1863," 
over one-fifth of the volume, or close on two hundred 
pages is devoted to (jconomic geology, sp(>cific infor- 
mation being here given in respect to mineral occur- 
rence, location and utilization; while in g(Mieral the 

♦Life of Sir William E. Logan — \>y U. .1. IlaniiiKlon, p. HI. 
(Montreal : Daw.son Hro.s., 188:5.) 



various reports contained in this volume are character- 
ized by the amount of practical information afforded. 
In 1844 Mr. Logan established in the " Upper Cham- 
ber " of his brother's warehouse in Montreal a museum 
in which to display the large quantities of organic 
remains and minerals collected by himself and Mr. 
Murray, during their summer explorations; and still 
bearing in mind economic requirements, he employed 
at his own pecuniary risk, a chemist to make the 
necessary analyses of mineral specimens. 

It was not until the following year, Logan having 
meanwhile drawn heavily on his own resources for 
the expenses of the work, that, thanks to Lord Metcalfe, 
the Survey was placed- on a better footing, the employ- 
ment of a chemist was authorized and the grant in- 
creased, covering a period of four years, to £2,000 per 
annum. But even under these improved conditions 
the difficulties of carrying on the work efficiently were 
enormous, not only by reason of financial disabilities 
but on account of the physical obstacles to be over- 
come. The greater portion of the country was, of 
course, a lerra incognita, so that the geologists were 
obliged to devote the major part of their time in the 
field to topographical observations. In another of 
his long and interesting letters to his friend, De la 
Beche, Logan wrote: "I \^ifi I could let you see the 
map of our journey across from the St. Lawrence to 
Bay Chaleur. The, length of our winding fine is 111 
miles, in which we dialled the twists and turns of two 
rivers, one thirty-five miles and the other sixty-five 
miles, obtaining the bearings of the reaches by pris- 
matic compass and the distances by Rochon's micro- 
meter, and registering at the same time the quality, 
contents and attitude of every bed of rock we saw, 
with barometric heights, etc. The distance between 
the rivers we triangulated by means of well marked 
peaks. I think you would say we deserve some credit 
for it." In later years, he also refers to the time 
occupied in work of this character. " It will be easily 
understood," he remarks, "that this geographical 
work must unavoidably impede the rapidity of geo- 
logical examination; and the necessity of so much 
measurement to fix the position of rock exposures, 
forces us, in order to make even a moderate progress, 
to examine fewer of them, or to give to each a shorter 
time than we would like, arid thus, perhaps, to over- 
look some of its characteristics." This point was 
well emphasized by Prof. Agassiz in his evidence before 
the select committee above referred to, in which after 
speaking of the inadequate means placed at the disposal 
of the geologists, he says, "Topographical surveys, 
to be satisfactory ought to be founded upon astro- 
nomical observations, but who would therefore expect 
that astronomers should leave their telescopes, go 
into field, chart in hand, and draw maps. Mining 
operations bear to geology .the same relations, that 
geodetic operations bear to astronomy. All that may 
be fairly expected of a geologist, is to prepare a geo- 
logical map of the province he surveys, and thus 
obtain the information, without which the mineral 
resources of a country cannot be satisfactorily ascer- 
tained." 

At the close of the year 1846 Dr. (then Mr.) Sterry 
Hunt, who subsequently did so much useful work in 
connection with the survey in Canada, was appointed 
to the staff, replacing Mr. De Rottermond, as chemist 
and mineralogist. 

Meanwhile the Provincial Act, passed in 1845, had 
made provision for the continuation of the Geological 
Survey for five years only, and the time was drawing 
to a close. However, not without a delay that inter- 
fered considerably with the work of the Survey, the 




0 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



107 



act was finally renewed with the same provisions. 
In the same year the Government decided to send a 
collection of Canadian economic minerals to the first 
of the great International Exhibitions in London, 
inaugurated by Prince Albert. This collection was 
prepared and placed in the charge of Mr. Logan, who 
by-the-way during his stay in London, was called upon 
to defray his own expenses. The exhibit, which ob- 
tained a medal, came in for a great deal of notice and 
praise, the Times referring to it as the most interesting 
and the most complete of all the collections sent from 
the British Colonies. While in London, Logan was 
elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. Up to this 
time actual geological investigations and examinations 
had been conducted in the mineral bearing districts 
of Lake Superior, Lake Huron, their coasts and islands ; 
the Huron-Erie Peninsula; the Ottawa river valley; 
the Eastern Townships from the Richelieu to the 
Chaudiere; in the St. Lawrence valley, the Island of 
Anticosti; the Gaspe Peninsula; the north shore of 
the St. Lawrence for a considerable distance east and 
west from Montreal and the country between Lake 
Simcoe and Kingston. By way of contrast it may be 
noted that whereas in 1857 geological work in Canada — 
a country then comprising 331,280 sc[uare miles — 
was being undertaken by a staff of two geologists and 
a chemist, in the State of New York whose area is 
about 46,200 sc[uare miles, a geological staff was em- 
ployed including four geologists, four assistant geo- 
logists and a palteontologist ; with an annual grant 
of £2,000 as against one of $20,000, exclusive of the 
cost of publications. 

In 1854, in consecjuence of a popular demand that 
steps should be taken to give a wider circulation to 
the valuable reports and publications of the Survey 
and thus make them more generally accessible to the 
public, a select committee on the Geological Survey 
was appointed by the Government. The evidence 
before this committee of Messrs. Logan and Hunt, 
and of other distinguished witnesses, namely: Prof. 
James Hall, of the New York Survey; Prof. E. J. 
Chapman, of University College, Toronto; Mr. Alex- 
ander Russell, of the Department of Crown Lands; 
the Rev. Andrew Bell, of L'Orignal; Prof. Horan, of 
Quebec, and of Prof. Agassi z, makes very interesting 
reading and was of a highly complimentary character, 
but referred to the difficulties under which the survey 
was working. 

Notwithstanding the generally favorable impression 
which Logan and his work had made upon the people 
of Canada, there must have been some who were still 
skeptical as to the advantages which the country 
would derive from the Geological Survey. The Com- 
mittee, therefore, did not fail to interrogate Logan 
closely on this subject. "Can you," they asked, 
" give any illustration of the manner in which a sound 
scientific basis leads to practical economical results?" 
and again, "Have you in your survey as your prin- 
cipal object the establishment of new scientific facts, 
or has your attention been directed to discovery ancl 
pointing out economic advantages?" From Logan's 
answers to these questions we make the following 
extracts. 

"The object of the survey is to ascertain the mineral 
resources of the country and this is kept steadily in 
view. Whatever new scientific facts have resulted 
from it have come out in the course of what I conceive 
to be economic researches carried on in a scientific 

way Thus economics lead to science and 

science to economics. The physical structure of the 
area examined is, of course, especially attended to, 
as it is by means of it that the range or distribution of 



useful materials, both discovered and to be discovered, 
can be made intelligible. A strict attention to fossils 
is essential in ascertaining the physical structure. . . I 
do not describe fossils but I use them. They are 
geological friends who direct me in the way to what 
is valuable. One of them who is not yet specifically 
baptized, helped us last year to trace out upwards 

of fifty miles of hydraulic limestone My whole 

connection with geology is of a practical character. 
I am by profession a miner and a metallurgist. A due 
regard to my own interests forced me into the practice 
of geology, and it was more particularly to the economic 
bearings of the science that my attention was devoted." 

After hearing the evidence, the committee made 
the following recommendations: 

(1) Republication of a revised edition of not less 
than 20,000 copies of the reports, with a coloured map. 

(2) Publication of the same number of annual re- 
ports in future years. 

(3) The periodical publication of 3,000 copies of 
plates and descriptions of fossils, etc. 

(4) Gratuitous distribution of reports in certain 
directions and the remainder to be sold at cost price. 

(5) Establishment and maintenance of the museum 
and library upon an efficient footing. 

(6) To provide for the supply of geological and 
mineralogical specimens to other museums. 

(7) The employment of topographical surveyors 
and their parties to assist in the geological surveys, 
when judged necessary. 

(8) The employment of two or three additional 
explorers. 

(9) The employment of a resident assistant, as 
keeper of the museum, and in the general business of 
the office. 

(10) The employment of a second assistant geologist, 
charged more especially with the exploration of mineral 
localities. (But to this the rider is added: "The 
committee wislf it to be understood that in the present 
state of the country they consider this the least essential 
addition to the establishment, and unless ample funds 
are provided, they would not advise it, to the pre- 
judice of any other of their recommendations."). 

(11) The encouragement of voluntary assistance by 
the publication of questions and short instructions 
now and what to observe and collect. 

(12) Securing the aid of deputy provincial surveyors, 
and requiring candidates in the future to pass an ex- 
amination in the rudiments of geology. 

(13) The establishments of certain points in differ- 
ent parts of the country, as a basis from which local 
surveys may be reckoned. 

(14) Requiring railway companies to furnish plans 
and sections of their surveys. 

Accompanying these recommendations an estimate 
was furnished, in which the annual cost of the De- 
partment was placed at $6,000. 

At the Paris Exhibition of 1855 Canada's collection 
of minerals, in the charge of Messrs. Logan and Hunt, 
was very highly commended, and for his services in 
this regard Logan was awarded a gold medal and pre- 
sented by the French Emperor with the cross of the 
Le gion of Honour, and in the following year. Her 
Majesty conferred on him the honour of Knighthood, 
and the Geological Society bestowed on him the 
Wollaston Medal, as a sign of their appreciation of 
his work. On his return to Canada the Geological 
Act of 1850 had expired, and doubtless apart from the 
findings of the select committees, the honour shown 
to Sir William while abroad and the influence he per- 
sonally exerted upon his return, was to no small de- 



108 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



grce responsible for the renewal of the Act for a further 
term of five years and the increase of the annual 
grant to £5,000. 

The years 1860 and 1861 were uneventful in the 
history of the Survey, but in 1862, under its auspices, 
another large collection of minerals was exhibited at 
the London International Exhibition of that year, 
Sir William Logan being appointed Commissioner. 
Upon his return to Montreal in 1863, his great volume 
on the Geology of Canada was completed and ]niblished. 
Meanwhile, as has already been shown, the existence 
of the Survey had been extremely precarious, on 
account of its dependence U])on an altogether insuffi- 
cient annual grant. Accordingly Sir William now 
addressed a letter to the Minister of Finance under 
the McDonald-Dorion administration, urging in the 
strongest terms the necessity of more liberal action 
on the part of the Government. 

The fund provided for the maintenance of the survey 
in 1863 was, he pointed out, exhausted and a certain 
sum was falling due for the cost of illustrating the 
report, while the grant of the previous session was 
insufficient to pay expenses, and allowed nothing for 
pui)lications. He had, in fact, not only disbursed 
$4,000 out of his own pocket in the purchase of works 
for the library, surveying instruments, etc., but in 
order that the work should be carried on during the 
year. Parliament having dissolved without granting 
supplies, he actually advanced the necessary funds, 
amounting to upwards of $10,000, for the purpose. 
Shortly after this letter was written a change of Minis- 
try occurred and the Act making provision for the 
Survey was again renewed for another period of five 
years. Nothing of notable importance appears to 
have occurred until 1866, when another mineral 
exhibit, which was instrumental in attracting much 
attention to Canada, was sent to Paris in charge of 
Dr. Hunt and Mr. Richardson. 

Early in 1869 Sir William Logan' resigned the 
Directorship, and was succeeded by Mr. (afterwards 
Dr.) A. R. C. Selwyn, an English geologist, who for 
many years had directed the Geological Survey of 
Victoria, Australia. Mr. Selwyn, however, does not 
appear, judging from his earlier reports, to have 
devoted as much attention to the subject of economic 
geology as his illustrious predecessor, although in the 
Report of 1871-72 some valuable information is afforded 
by Mr. Richardson on the coal fields of Vancouver 
Island, and by Mr. Vennor in connection with the 
occurrences of iron and apatite in the Counties of Leeds, 
Frontenac and Lanark, and of gold in the Township 
of Marmora. In this year also a first attempt was 
made to compile mining statistics, figures being given 
for the three years, 1869, 1870 and 1871. In view 
of the great developments that have since taken place 
it may be of interest to quote from these returns. 
Thus the average annual production at this period is 
stated as follows: 



Name of Province 

Ontario 

Cjuebcc 

Nova .Scotia, (coal) 

Nova Scotia, (jiold) 

Nova Scotia, (other minerals). . 

New Brunswick 

Newfoundland 

lirilisli (;o)iimi)ia (Kold) 

Kritisli (,'olutnl)ia (co.-il) 

Total annual average . 



Value of Product 
at Mine. 



$996,982 
3.30,209 

1,192,36.5 
3.')1,26G 
220,000 
262,288 
233,702 

1,336,066 
1.51,952 



$5,044,830 



On the grounds, however, that mine owners neg- 
lected to make the returns asked for, no further 
attempt was made to continue this useful work until 
many years later. The volumes of 1874-5-6-7 are 
largely scientific in character, much space being oc- 
cupied also with somewhat trivial details recounting 
incidents of camp life and travel. Mr. Selwyn, how- 
ever, appears to have shared the views of Sir William 
Logan in respect to the importance of exploration in 
the iron and coal fields of Nova Scotia and Cape Breton, 
for in the Report for 1874-75, he explains that unusual 
attention has been devoted to geological work in 
Nova Scotia, as "the development of coal and iron 
mines exerts a far greater and more beneficial influence 
upon the material progress and prosperity of the 
country than can be ascribed to that of any other 
product of mining industry." At the same time he 
complains of the inadecjuacy of his staff and the urgency 
of better provision in this respect, pointing out that 
two-thirds of the time and attention of explorers was 
then being occupied in making topographical measure- 
ments for the construction of the essential preliminary 
maps. 

In 1877 " An Act to make better provision respecting 
the Geological and Natural History Survey of Canada, 
and for the maintenance of the Museum in connection 
therewith," was passed by the Dominion Parliament, 
but while the scope and objects of the Department 
were enlarged, so as to include various branches of 
natural history, there was at first no corresponding 
increase in the appropriation granted. This was 
subsequently remedied, and the Survey commenced 
to take up natural history work of various kinds, but 
still showed little disposition to assist the miner in 
a practical manner. At length, after the issuance of 
what happened to be a very meagre report for the 
years 1880-81-82, complaint became so general that a 
select committee was appointed by the House of 
Commons to obtain information as to the methods 
adopted by the Geological Surveys in Canada and 
other countries in the prosecution of their work, 
with a view of ascertaining if additional technical and 
statistical records of mining and metallurgical develop- 
ment in the Dominion should not be procured and given 
to the public. After hearing the evidence, the com- 
mittee published a lengthy report, from which the 
following extracts are taken: — 

"The committee notices the serious lack 

of attention to the mining industries of the country in 
actual operation. Under the administration of Sir 
William Logan, but little progress had been made in 
actual mining developments, particularly in the 
limited sphere of his labours — the present Provinces 
of Ontario and Quebec. Since his day, not only has 
the field of practical mining been greatly enlarged 
by the addition of the Maritime Provinces with their 
extensive coal and gold mines in actual operation, but 
in the previous fields we have to note the discovery 
and development of the iron and gold deposits in 
Ontario, the phosphates of Kingston and the Ottawa 
Valley, the gold of the Chaudiere district and the copper, 
iron and asbestos deposits of the Eastern Townships, 
yet we look in vain in the present report for any in- 
formation, either of a statistical nature of their pro- 
duction, or of a descriptive or geological character, 
as to their i)rogress or peculiarities. Thirteen pages 
of the last report suffice to narrate the work of the 
Survey for the last two years, in connection with the 
mines in actual operation in the whole Dominion. . 
In the opinion of the committee, the primary object of 
the Survey should be to obtain and disseminate, as 
speedily and extensiv(4y as jwssible, practical infer- 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



109 



mation as to the economic mineral resources of- this 
country, and scientific investigations should be treated 
as of only secondary importance, except when neces- 
>ary in procuring practical results." 

In concluding their report the committee strongly 
recommended the appointment to the staff of the 
Survey of a duly qualified mining engineer, whose 
special business it should be to keep himself and the 
public informed as to all mining developments and 
progress, and to procure and preserve full statistical 
information in respect thereto. 

But it may be stated in fairness, that this very 
report which came in for much unfavourable comment 
and criticism, contained an account by Dr. Dawson 
of the discovery and value of the Crow's Nest coal 
area, probably one of the most important announce- 
ments of an economic character ever made by the 
Survey. 

It is to be noted also that in his summary report 
for 1885, Mr. Selwyn refers to the publication of thirty- 
seven reports, signifying by their titles their special 
bearing on mines, mineral deposits and statistics of 
mineral production, while special examinations of 
mining districts were begun in 1883 in the Lake of 
the Woods gold region, the phosphate region in the 
townships of Wakefield and Templeton; and, in 1884, 
in the Marmora gold and iron bearing region, and the 
mining region around the north shore of Lake Superior, 
as well as in some of the Quebec mining districts. 
The investigation by the Parliamentary Committee 
appears, however, to have served some useful purpose, 
inasmuch as a Mines Branch in the charge of Messrs. 
Coste and Ingall was afterwards established, and a 
first and comprehensive statistical report issued in 
the volume for 1886, in which the total value of the 
mineral production of Canada for that year is given as 
$10,529,361. In the preceding volume, Mr. Coste 
also contributed an interesting paper entitled "Obser- 
vations on Mining Laws and Mining in Canada, with 
suggestions for the better development of the mineral 
resources of the Dominion," and many of the comments 
in regard to the defects in the law of that time, apply 
with equal point and force at the present day. The 
annual reports from henceforward certainly show 
that a greater interest in mining developments was 
being taken by the Survey than formerly- and a great 
deal of valuable information bearing on this subject 
is made available. Although the Klondike excite- 
ment did not eventuate until nearly ten years later, 
the Survey as early as 1887 called attention to the 
gold potentialities of the region in a report written 
by Dr. Dawson, who had associated with him on his 
expedition, as assistants, Messrs. McConnell and 
McEvoy; while in addition to useful facts secured by 
Dr. Bell relative to the Sudbury district, by Mr. F. D. 
Adams and in the Laurentian country, Dr. Ells in the 
Eastern Townships, and by Mr. Bowman in Cariboo 
district, B.C., special investigations in the mining 
districts were undertaken by Mr. Ingall of the Mines 
Section. In Part II of the Report for 1887-88 also 
appears Dr. Dawson's most valuable treatise, on "The 
Mineral Wealth of British Columbia," which to this 
day is in frequent request; while in the following year 
Dr. R. W. Ells reported very fully on the Mineral 
Resources of Quebec. In the spring of 1889, Mr. Coste 
resigned charge of Mineral Statistics Division, and 
was succeeded by Mr. E. D. Ingall. 

In 1890, a new Act was passed repealing the Act of 
1877, in which the duties and objects of the Survey 
were set forth as follows: — 

(a) To make a full and scientific examination and 
survey of the geological structure, mineralogy, mines 



and mining resources of Canada and of its fauna and 
flora; 

(b) To maintain a museum of geological and natural 
history and arrange for exhibition such specimens as 
are necessary to afford a complete and exact knowledge 
of the geology, mineralogy and mining resources of 
Canada; 

(c) To collect and publish full statistics of the 
mineral production and of the mining and metallur- 
gical industry of Canada; to study the facts relating 
to water supply. . . and of mines and mining 
work in Canada. 

The Act also constituted the Geological and Natural 
History Survey a separate department, instead of a 
branch or sub-department of the Department of the 
Interior. In calling attention to a provision in this 
Act by which no persons unless science graduates of 
recognized schools or colleges may be appointed to 
the staff, Dr. Selwyn in the report of 1890-91, com- 
ments as follows: — 

By these provisions "it is hoped to maintain the 
efficiency and high scientific standing of the depart- 
ment, but in order to insure this desirable result a 
scale of remuneration should be established in the 
department, more in accordance than it is at present 
with that which obtains elsewhere, and even in other 
departments of the public service and in the universities 
of Canada, for acquirements and experience such as is 
required of the technical officers of the Geological 
Survey, and in view of the risks, hardships and re- 
sponsibilities they are often called upon to undertake." 
This representation is alluded to in passing, as it is 
a grievance of a very real nature which still exists, 
and it is hoped may in the near future be remedied. 

In connection with the collection of mining statistics 
it may be . mentioned that in 1891 an attempt was 
made to seek the co-operation of the Provinces, and 
thanks to the good offices of Mr. John Robson, then 
Provincial Secretary, the endeavour met with ready 
response in British Columbia. In this regard Mr. 
Ingall in his report for 1892 writes "The confidence 
of the mining community . . .now gained, has 
resulted in an increasingly hearty response to our 
circulars," and this statement is borne out by the 
exceptional value and comprehensiveness of the report 
of the Division of Mineral Statistics and Mines at this 
date. 

In January, 1895, Dr. Selwyn resigned the director- 
ship of the Survey, and was succeeded by Dr. George 
M. Dawson. Much more attention was now being 
given to mining developments, and the first annual 
report for which Dr. Dawson was responsible is of 
unusual interest. Thus, an account is given of borings 
undertaken for petroleum under the auspices of the 
Survey, at Athabasca Landing; Mr. McEvoy reports 
on recent developments of economic minerals in the 
Kamloops area, and refers to the occurrence of cin- 
nabar at Savanas. He also describes his observations 
on hydraulic mining in Cariboo. Mr. McConnell gives 
a statement of the characteristics of the important 
mines of West Kootenay; Mr. Mclnnes reports of the 
occurrence of economic minerals near Sault Ste. Marie; 
Dr. Ells describes the occurrences of iron, galena, 
ochre and mica in the counties of Ottawa, Pontiac and 
Carleton; Mr. Low calls attention to discoveries of 
hematite and siderite in the Labrador Peninsula; 
Mr. Fletcher refers to iron and coal developnwnts in 
Nova Scotia, while Mr. Faribault's report on gold in 
this Province is of great practical value. This gentle- 
man in speaking of (piartz mining in Nova Scotia, 
points out that the gold-bearing deposits in that 
Province are really in the form of saddle veins on 



110 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



anticlinal folds and shows that on a proper recognition 
of this fact largely depends the success and future of 
deep gold mining in Nova Scotia. He also advises 
the adoption of a method of mining followed in Ben- 
digo, where the occurrences are of a very similar nature, 
which consists in sinking perpendicular shafts on the 
anticlinal axis from which cross-cuts and levels are 
driven to intersect the interbedded saddles. Mr. 
Ingall, reporting in this volume, complains however that 
the funds placed at his disposal were insufficient for 
the prosecution of important mining work which had 
been initiated by the Mines Section. 

In 1895, the Survey undertook a new duty in supply- 
ing small typical collections of Canadian minerals and 
rocks to educational institutions in Canada, and no 
less than fifty-nine collections of this kind, embracing 
6655 specimens, were furnished. In addition, the 
excellent work of the previous year was extended along 
similar lines. 

In short, during Dr. Dawson's all too short term of 
office as Director of the Survey both his own-work in 
the field and that of the department generally was of 
an eminently useful and practical character. This is 
well pointed out by Dr. F. D. Adams in his " Memoir 
of George M. Dawson," *where he states "his work 
. . . . contributed largely to great development 
of the mining industries. . . during recent years, 
for his reports, though thoroughly scientific, always 
took account of the practical and economic side of 
geology, and accordingly commanded the attention 
and confidence of mining capitalists, mine managers, 
and others interested in the development of the mineral 
resources of the country." Dr. H. M. Ami, in his 
appreciative biographical sketch also refers to the 
consideration given by Dr. Dawson to economic work 
"Through his personal efforts," he writes, "and that 
of his staff, he did so much to disseminate information 
regarding Canada's mineral resources, that the mining 
interests of the Dominion may now be said to be fairly 
well established upon a firm and non-speculative basis." 

Dr. Dawson died suddenly on the 2nd of March, 1901. 
And from that time to the present the Survey has 
been without a Director. These duties, however, 
have been performed by Dr. Robert Bell, who as 
Acting Director, has had the responsibility of the 
work, but neither the honour nor the emoluments 
which should go with it. Under Dr. Bell much work 
of great value has been done by the Survey; but in its 
relation to the mining industries it is necessary to add 
that the present system, which remains practically 
the same as that followed a quarter of a century ago,, 
is by many, competent to express an opinion, regarded 
as antiquated and inadequate having regard to present 
requirements, the growth to which the mining industry 
has since attained, and the important position it now 
occupies. And by contrasting the methods adopted 
by the United States' Survey with those still followed 
by our own, this complaint appears to have certain 
justification. Taking, for the sake of example, one 
branch, the Mining and Statistical Division of the 
Survey, it is impossible to truthfully assert that its 
scope or usefulness has l)een greatly, if at all, extended 
since the date of its inception. In fact it is currently 
believed that the officer in charge of the branch has 
received little, if any encouragement at any time to 
special effort in this regard. The geological reports 
tliemsc^lves too, although fre(iuentJy of great value from 
an econoini(; jwint of vi(!W, arc, witli some oxcejjtions, 
still somewhat unsuitable for general circulation, 
since they rarely contain the; practical details and facts 



*null. Gcol. Hoc, Am. Val. V.i, lOOl. 



in that readily accessible form which the busy man of 
affairs, contemplating an investment in any one of our 
mineral industries is desirous of having placed at his 
disposal. 

THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINES BRANCH OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

It was doubtless in consequence of a realization of 
the requirements in this respect that the Government 
in July, 1902, established in connection with the 
Department of the Interior, a Mines Branch, in charge 
of Dr. Eugene Haanel, Ph.D., who received the title 
of Superintendant of Mines. The establishment of 
the Mines Branch did not include a statement of its 
functions, but a memorandum suggesting the lines on 
which organization should proceed, was prepared and 
presented to the Minister. 

The work to be accompHshed by the Department 
would, the memorandum states, most conveniently be 
distributed among the following sections: — 

1st: Mineral Resources. — The general object of the 
work of this branch to be the collection and publication 
of data regarding the economic minerals of the country 
and of the processes and activities connected with 
their utilization. This to be accomplished under the 
following two heads: 

(a) . Statistics: Covering the investigations into (1) 
the production, consumption, exports and imports of 
the economic minerals of the country, (2) the collect- 
ing of figures relating to costs, freight, markets, etc. 
These tabulated on a proper system of classification, 
with discussions as to the causes of variation of pro- 
duction, exports and imports, fluctuations of market, 
etc., should be published annually, or at such frequent 
intervals as may be found practicable. 

(b) . Technological: Covering the preparation and 
publication of bulletins and monographs giving infor- 
mation in a concise form regarding (1) the location, 
mode of occurrence, extent and character of the various 
economic mineral deposits, (2) assays and analyses of 
ores and in the case of building material, tests of 
strength and endurance of pressure, etc., (3) description 
of the method of exploitation, treatment for extraction 
of metallic contents, or resultant products. The infor- 
mation to be obtained from material already published, 
but scattered and in a great measure inaccessible, to be 
supplemented wherever necessary by visit of officer in 
charge to the respective localities. A separate mono- 
graph for each mineral, as coal, iron, copper, nickel, 
gold, etc. (except building materials which may be 
written up as a class to be published, giving all avail- 
able information in reference to them. The publica- 
tions specially framed to meet the needs of the public 
commercially interested in these matters and annually 
bound in one volume, entitled " The Mineral Resources 
of Canada." The separate monographs to be dis- 
tributed as widely and freely as possible to bring the 
mineral wealth of Canada prominently before the in- 
vesting public and thus aid in bringing capital into the 
country, necessary for the development of its resources. 

2nd : Mining Geology. — Covering the investigation of 
mineral areas and mining camps, determining the 
mode of occurrence, extent and character of the ore 
bodies and furnishing to the practical miner clues 
regarding the proijable direction in which to exploit 
his property, and l)y a careful study of the associated 
rocks and their relation to the ore bodies establishing 
principles which shall be helpful as a guide regarding 
the occurrence of similar ores in other regions. This 
to include the preparation of good topographical and 
geological structure maps of important mining districts. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Ill 



3rd: Metallurgy, Assaying and Chemistry. — The pei- 
sonal of this section would be occupied in assaying 
the ores and first marketable products of mines collect- 
ed by the mining geologists, and performing such rock- 
analyses as may be recpiired by the mining geologists 
for purposes of determining the composition of rocks 
in association with the ore deposits. 

The further work of the section would consist in 
analysing such material as may from time to time 
be sent to the Mines Branch from outside parties. 

CONCLUSIONS. 

This historical survey brings us down to the present 
ime and to review the economic work accomplished 
y the Survey in a few words, it may be said that practi- 
cally all the information which we possess concerning 
the mineral resources of the Dominion has been collected 
by the officers of the Geological Survey, with the ex- 
ception of that which we owe to the Provincial Mining 
Bureaus of British Columbia and Ontario, and to the 
Mines Branch of the Department of the Interior, all 
of which have been established within the last few 
years. But while the Survey has been immense 
value in the development of the country,, the estab- 
lishment of a separate Mines Branch in the Depart- 
ment of the Interior may be held to indicate that in 
the opinion of the mining men of Canada the Survey 
has not in recent years, on its strictly economic side, 
kept pace with the growing requirements of the mining 
industry, and that the immense mass of information 
which it has collected has not been reduced to a suffi- 
ciently accessible form. 

In this connection, however, it must be noted, that 
with the exception of experimental metallurgy, every 
line of work which is set forth as within the purview 
of the Mines Branch, has been already taken up or is 
now being prosecuted by the Geological Survey of 
Canada. In making this statement it must be clearly 
understood that there is no intention, in what has l^een 
said, to minimize the value of the work accomplished 
by the Mines Branch of the Department of the Interior 
since its inauguration, but merely to point out that, 
Avhile by means of a large special grant placed at its 
disposal the Mines Branch has been able to produce 
a number of reports of marked economic value, the 
production of such reports does not demand the 
existence of such a separate bureau. Given a properly 
reconstructed Geological Survey, of which the present 
Mines Branch might form part , it could employ the 
same extra grant with at least equal economic efficiency. 

Such work of the highest quality, is being carried 
out on an enormous scale by the Geological Survey of 
the United States, which working in the territory 
immediately south of us, has to deal with conditions 
which resemble very closely those obtaining in Canada 
at the present time. Moreover the work done by this 
Survey has so emphatically commended itself to the 
mining interests in the neighbouring Republic that 
the Government have repeatedly extended the scope 
of the Survey and greatly increased the sum appro- 
priated for its use. 

As a matter of fact, our mining community in Canada, 
while admitting that the Geological Survey of Canada 
has accomplished an immense amount of good work in 
times past, points to the immense increase in the 
volume and value of the mineral output of Canada 
as shown by the following figures : — 

TABLE SHOWING MINERAL PRODUCTION OF CANADA. 

Value in Dollars. 

1871 5,044,830 

1887 10,221,2,55 

1887 11,321,331 



1888 12,518,894 

1889 14,013,913 

1890 1 6,763,3.53 

1891 18,698,9,53 

1892 16,628,417 

1893 20,035,082 

1894 19,931,1.58 

1895 20,648,964 

1896 22,584,513 

1897 28,661,430 

1898 38,697,021 

1899 49,584,027 

1900 64,618,268 

1901 66,339,158 

1902 63,865,797 

1903 62,532,210 

1904 60,343,165 



It also points out the present position which the 
product of the mine holds, as compared with the 
agricultural exports of the Dominion, as shown by 
the following figures: — 

TABLE SHOWIxNG THE AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS OF THE DOMINION. 



Value in Dollars . 

1896 39,659,686 

1879 46,377,927 

1898 68,919,688 

1899 • 62,528,107 

1900 73,281,760 

1901 66,872.292 

1902 80,705.186 

1903 99,420.195 

1904 (about) 98,300,000 



In view of these figures and of the fact that the 
agricultural interests of Canada have been and are 
being enormously developed by the Government, 
through the Department of Agriculture under the 
charge of a special minister of the Crown, our mining 
men ask why the great mining interests of the Dominion 
might not be similarly cared for. 

It is not here necessary to enumerate the many 
ways in which the Governments of other countries do, 
and our Government could, actively assist in the 
development of mining industry. Our views on this 
matter have already been set forth in a paper read 
before this Institute and printed in one of the volumes 
of our Transactions. (Jour. Can. Min. Institute, 1902, 
pp. 585-595). Our aim here is merely to point out 
that the mining industries of Canada might at the 
present time be greatly assisted if the work of the 
Geological Survey and the Mines Branch of the De- 
partment of the Interior was taken up seriously by 
the Government, correlated, systematized, extended, 
and made to conform to modern requirements. The 
duplication which now exists would thus, in the 
interests of economy, be avoided and the whole work 
would be put upon a proper businesslike basis. 

If this were done, it is certain that the mining 
interests of the country would be well served and that 
the action of the Government would receive the hearty 
endorsation of everyone interested in mining and 
that furthermore, as the value of the work became 
increasingly evident the Government would feel 
justified in providing additional means for its prosecu- 
tion, so that a larger staff of properly paid and thorough- 
ly efficient men, au fait with the modern methods and 
results of science as applied to the study of these 
economic problems, could be permanently employed 
by the Government in the development of the mineral 
resources of our country. 

All Canadians would be sorry to see the Geological 
Survey of Canada lose its independent existence, seeing 
that it is a branch of the service of which, with all its 
faults, we Canadians have reason to be proud. But 
if the happy result above indicated could be insured 
by the appointment of a Minister of Mines who would 



112 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



have direct supervision of this work, the expansion of 
the "Geological Survey into a Department of Mines 
and Geological Survey, would receive the support of 
the whole mining community. 



THE EDUCATION OF MINING AND METAL- 
LURGICAL ENGINEERS. 

By Professor ,1ohn Bonsall Porter, Ph.D., D.Sc. 

Until a comparatively recent day Engineers as a body 
have shown little interest in what may be broadly 
termed Engineering Education, and have left it to the 
LTniversities and Technical Schools to formulate and 
carry out such schemes for training young men as the}' 
have seen fit. There have of course been notable 
exceptions and many Engineers of the highest rank have 
given invaluable advice, assistance and sympathy, but 
the general feeling of practical engineers and perhaps 
particularly of Mining Engineers to teachers of En- 
gineering has been more or less unfriendly. 

Under these conditions the natural tendency of ]h-o- 
fessors to become pedantic was not sufficiently neutra- 
lized, and although the public demand for advanced 
education led first to the foundation of professorships 
in engineering in each of the great LTniversities, and 
later to the development of special faculties and schools 
of Engineering with elaborately differentiated depart- 
ments covering the several branches of the subject; 
yet, in general the methods of teaching remained some- 
what academic to say the least. 

It is but a very few years since it was possible, or 
even quite a matter of course for young men to be 
granted University degrees in Mining Engineering 
without even having seen a mine, and in other branches 
of Engineering the situation was no less absurd. 

The so-called Summer School established twenty odd 
years ago by Columbia University and adopted (usually 
as an optional course) by several other Mining Schools 
was the first and most important move in the right 
direction. The equipment of Engineering Labora- 
tories and later of special laboratories of ore dressing 
and metallurgy, was almost equally useful; and now 
every school of importance is provided with labora- 
tories, and offers its students so called practical and 
experimental courses in many branches of engineering. 

These changes and the introduction of manual and 
technical training in both elementary schools and col- 
leges have met with approval from practical engineers, 
and during the last few years the technical journals and 
the Transactions of Societies have contained a great 
number of papers on Engineering Education. Further 
practising engineers and works managers have displayed 
interest in the education of young men and have shown 
a far greater willingness than heretofore to admit 
students to their establishments and to offer employ- 
ment to engineering graduates. 

This general interest in technical education is most 
gratifying to those professionally engaged in engineer- 
ing teaching and is bound to result in great good, but 
it is not without its dangers. 

The practising engineer, no matter how thorough his 
own education has been, usually finds little or no 
(lir(!ct use in his practise for higher mathematics and 
for the pure sciences, and he fails to realize the im- 
mense part played in his own intellectual development 
by the study of these subjects. On the other hand 
he is constantly concerned with technical details and 
naturally looks with api)roval on any scliool which 
turns out men ready with facts and figures for im- 



mediate use. His influence is therefore almost always 
in favor of technical as compared with scientific educa- 
tion. 

For somewhat similar reasons the majority of en- 
gineering students — at least in North America — are 
very keen to work at studies which have direct and 
obvious bearings on their future profession, and are 
grudging of time given to pure science. They fail to 
see why in a mining course, for example, mining itself 
should be assigned fewer hours of study than certain 
other subjects, and why all professional subjects to- 
gether should occupy but one quarter of their cour.sc. 

Similarly, many managers and even thoroughly 
educated engineers in judging the comparative merits 
of young men seeking employment, naturally prefer 
those who have a maximum of technical knowledge 
and can at once he made useful to men whose know- 
ledge is more general. 

Under these influences the engineering courses are 
being somewhat rapidly modified even in the more 
conservative schools. As a whole the changes are for 
the better, but, at the moment it is probable that in 
this country at least, too great weight is being given to 
the technical side of education. Certainly there is 
great confusion in the minds of many laymen and some 
teachers between Science and Technology. Hbw to 
do a thing is taught rather than why to do it, and in 
the stress and rush of filling students with facts the 
infinitely more important business of teaching them 
to think is almost forgotten. 

This utilitarian tendency is shewn most fully in the 
Correspondence Schools which have sprung up within 
the last few years and now number their students by 
hundreds of thousands. These schools have largely 
taken over the work once attempted by night schools, 
mechanics classes, etc., and as a whole do it admirably, 
but they are unfair to their patrons in that they often 
ignore or make light of difficulties and give their 
students a somewhat exaggerated idea of the com- 
pleteness of their own knowledge. The young men 
who take these courses are rarely able to spare the time 
and money necessary for a University education and 
what they do learn is therefore all to the good, but it 
is unfortunate that these schools so often fail to make 
it clear to the students that purely technical know- 
ledge is after all only half knowledge, and that the 
highest achievements in engineering are only possible 
for men who are thoroughly familiar with ihe prin- 
ciples of the pure sciences underlying all engineering 
practice. 

Technical schools and similar institutions usually 
occupy a position in advance of the Correspondence 
Schools, but generally speaking their standards of 
admission and of class work are comparatively low, 
and it is left to the more conservative Universities 
and to certain exceptionally thorough technical schools 
to provide the highest type of engineering teaching. 

This teaching should be in general very similar for all 
branches of engineering. The preparatory work should 
include good elementary training in the usual school 
subjects, in elementary mathematics and in at least 
one modern language. Latin is also very desirable, 
and last, but far from least, the students should be able 
to write English accurately nnd clearly. 

Assuming this preparation to be of" the standard of 
the best Canadian and American schools, the engineer- 
ing course should then take four years, two of which 
can be devoted with advantage to Advanced Mathe- 
matics and to Physics, Chemistry, Geology, etc. With 
these pure science subjects there may be a certain 
amount of elementary shop work intended not to fit 
the men to be mechanics, but merely to familiarize 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



113 



them with materials of engineering and with the 
elements of shop and foundry practice. Time must 
also be found for mechanical drawing and some sketch- 
ing. 

The long vacations should also be. utilized in part for 
further shop experience in real works, or, in the case of 
mining students, for labourer's work underground, and 
for field classes in surA'eying. 

The two final years may then be given with safety to 
more technical studies. Pure mathematics being now 
sufficiently in hand its engineering applications to 
structures and machines are considered under the heads 
of _ Applied Mechanics and Macliine design. The 
elements of electrical and mechanical engineering are 
also essential to all engineers, and miners need also 
elementary Metallurgy and Mineralogy. The studies 
in chemistry and geology must also be extended, and 
laboratory work must be done in the one and field ex- 
perience gained in the other. 

The main part of the work last outlined can be done 
in the third year of the course and a portion of this year 
and almost the whole of the fourth can be given to what 
may be called "professional work," that is to say to 
special studies in the branch of engineering chosen by 
the student. In the case of Mining and Metallurgical 
students the various branches of mining and ore 
dressing and of advanced work in metallurgy may be 
included. 

It is obvious that no very elaborate detail can be 
taught in Technical courses which have to be carried 
through in a single year or at best in a year and a half, 
but elaborate work is not needed in engineering classes. 
The essential thing is to get students in the way of 
thinking as engineers, and to familiarize them with 
the general principles and fundamental problems of 
their profession. It would be impossible in one year 
or indeed in ten, to teach a student the detailed tech- 
nology of the whole of his selected branch of engineer- 
ing and it is obviously rarely possible to select the 
particular part which he will aftervv-ards practice. It is 
however quite possible to give an intelligent young man 
a general view of the subject, and then to teach him 
the technology of a limited number of carefully selected 
typical processes, and if he knows these thoroughly he 
will have no difficulty later in learning whatever special 
processes he is called upon to use. In other words if a 
man is taught to think as an engineer and to work as an 
engineer in any one branch of mining or metallurgy, 
he can whenever necessary quickly qualify himself for 
any other branch when the circumstances make it 
necessary. 

In what has been said above, practical work, summer 
schools, and laboratory experiments have been men- 
tioned, but it remains to discuss them at some length. 
The student of engineering should at an early period 
in his course have some training in shop work on the 
ordinary materials of construction. He will not be 
able to spare time enough to become a skilled workman 
or even a half skilled apprentice, and he must be made 
to understand this clearly; but he can and should work 
long enough to know something of the use of tools, and 
to understand the qualities of the materials of con- 
struction which he is about to study theoretically. This 
elementary shop work is often carried out in work shops 
connected with the schools and universities themselves, 
and frequently can be done in the afternoons of days, 
the mornings of which are given to more academic 
studies. This method is economical of time and there 
are many advantages in having the teaching and shop 
work under the same direction, but unless a boy is to 
get thorough practical training later, it is better for 
him to go to an ordinary shop where he should be re- 



quired to work full time each day under ordinary shop 
discipline. In no other way can he be made to realize 
what work really is; the intimate acquaintance with 
workmen is also very useful. 

This shop work if done outside of the school can 
usually be arranged for the long vacation. 

This shop work can usually be arranged for the long 
vacation, which should be long enough to give time for 
it, and for a reasonable holiday. Two periods of two 
or three months each in two successive vacations should 
suffice for an ordinary boy, especially as practical 
technical training is also required at a later period in 
his course. This latter technical work is even more 
important, in my opinion, than the shop experience. 
It should, if possible, follow the general science teach- 
ing, and precede the specialisation. The students 
should first be taken into the mines in a body and be 
given an opportunity to visit and study works under 
the guidance of a staff of competent instructors. After 
a month or two of this field work, each student should 
obtain bona-fide employment in some works in his 
chosen speciality, but the exact nature of the work is 
of no very great moment, so long as it is good en- 
gineering work, done by good workmen intelligently 
directed. The important thing again is to get the 
student in touch with real work and real wage-earners, 
and to give him an idea of scale. The elementary 
shop work may be done if necessary a{ convenient 
times in a school workshop, but this technical work 
must be real in every respect. The student should, 
for the time being, become a plain workman on wages, 
responsible to his foreman for certain duties, and liable 
to penalty or discharge for cause. 

The time to be given to the work must depend on 
circumstances. Three months under the right sort of 
foreman, in a small but interesting mine or works, will 
teach as much as a year of ill-directed drudgery. 
Furthermore, students differ greatly in the readiness 
with which they take to practical work. Some are 
the better students for having had many years of hard 
apprenticeship; but very frequently the man who has 
spent even one year in practice finds it difficult to 
return to his classes He is earning money at work, 
and can often ill-afford to give it up, and again become 
dependent on his people. Study also often proves 
irksome, and sometimes very difficult, after a man has 
been actively employed in work. As a result, many 
men fail to return to their final studies, and thus lose 
what should be the most useful part of their education. 

If a definite time for practical experience must be set 
in advance, it is probable that two periods of about 
four months each in different works, or one period of 
a year, would be about right; but in this, as in all 
other matters of technical education, it is far better 
to make the regulations somewhat elastic in respect of 
field work and advanced study. Much time can be 
saved the students, and their work made more effective, 
if each case is separately considered by the responsible 
head of their school. 

This last and most important period of practical 
training should follow the elementary engineering 
studies and if possible come between the third and the 
fourth year in a four years' course. From it the 
student comes back to his work with fresh enthusiasm 
yet without having got out of touch with academic 
methods as he would have done had he spent. a longer 
period at work. He now enters on his advance work 
and the teaching may be highly specialized and quite 
technical, but care must be taken to keep fundamental 
principles in sight, and the detailed technical work 
should be carefully laid out to cover only certain im- 
portant typical operations. This academic work can 



114 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW, 



be made much more interesting and effective by the 
free use of technical laboratories, in which engineering 
machinery (and in our case ore-dressing and metal- 
lurgical apparatus) can be used; but here, as in the 
lecture room care must be taken to teach principles, not 
processes. Certain processes must of course be used, 
and a good deal of careful detailed worlc done; but the 
primary purpose must always be to teach general 
principles, and mere technology must be kept in a 
secondary place. 

The best function of laboratories, aside from the 
limited use necessary to illustrate fundamental prin- 
ciples, is to develop the individuality of the students. 
Each man should be given certain carefully selected 
pieces of independent work, and he should be en- 
couraged to attack the task in his own way. One or 
two comparatively heavy investigations are far better 
than many short experiments, and the instructor in 
charge can often do his men far more good by showing 
interest, and yet letting them work out their own 
salvation whenever possible, than by being too ready 
to set up apparatus and smooth over difficulties. This 
advanced individual work can utilize to the full the 
resources of even the most magnificently ecjuipped la- 
boratories; but care should always be taken especially 
in schools which are very rich in practical apparatus, 
to see that the students should do a few things thought- 
fully, and with a clear apprehension of their bearing, 
rather than that they should get shallower experience 
of many processes and machines. 

In connection with this advanced study the men 
should be taught to write up their work, and to apply 
the knowledge gained in works, laboratories and lec- 
ture rooms, to some practical problems in engineering. 
In this, cjuestions of estimates and costs should be 
considered for the men are now about to go out into 
the world, where costs form an essential element in 
every enterprise. Estimates made even by advanced 
students are likely to be far from right, but their 
preparation gives the men extremely valuable ex- 
perience, and a competent instructor can do excellent 
work by discussing economic matters with his men in 
this stage of their training. 

This should end the school course in engineering, for 
no amount of mere teaching will turn a boy into an 
engineer, still less into a mining engineer. If, how- 
ever, he is given a good grounding in science and the 
principles of engineering, then put in touch with prac- 
tical engineering work, and finally taught the elements 
of the technology of his subject, he will be prepared as 
well as any school can prepare a man to go out into 
the world and learn to become a good engineer. 

Such a course of study as has been outlined above is 
very different from the old-fashioned course in Mining, 
and in fact is different in some respects from any course 
in Mining offered at present, although many schools 
approach it, and each year sees changes made which 
bring our science courses closer to this ideal. In this 
connection the author takes the liberty of briefly out- 
lining the course in Mining and Metallurgy offered by 
his own University, not because he believes it to be 
by any means perfect but because it illustrates very 
well the modern practice in engineering teaching.* 

At McGill University students are recjuired when 
entering to show a good knowledge of mathematics, 
of one modern and if y)ossiblc one ancient language 



* The illiist rMl Huis accompaiiyitiK t his pajx-r need no des- 
(Tiplioii bcyoiul lliiit piinlcd on (lie pliilcs. Tlicy iirK cIiOKCii 
witli a view lo illiisl raliny; I he cliaractcr of llic On; 1 )rcs,siii,!!; 
and M('tall\irf;ica,l lalioraloi'ics alone and do nol, by any means 
cov(;r the whole e(|uipnioiit of the d(!|)arlnient, much les.s of the 
courcic as a whole. 



and of the usual English and general subjects of the 
higher schools. They are then required for two years 
to devote their time to advanced mathematics, physics, 
chemistry, elementary mechanics and surveying. They 
also give a great deal of time to drawing and to shop 
work. In addition to their studies in the University 
they are required to do one month each year of extra 
mural work in surveying. 

Up to the end of the second year, all engineering 
students take the same course, after that differentia- 
tion begins, mining and civil engineers giving more 
time to surveying and surveying field work, while 
electrical and mechanical engineers spend additional 
time in the drafting rooms and machine shops. 

In the third year in the Mining and Metallurgical 
courses, lectures are given on the elements of Mining 
Metallurgy and ore dressing and final work is done in 
the more general engineering subjects. 

At the end of this year the class is taken to the field 
and five weeks are spent in studying mines and metal- 
lurgical works under the personal direction of the staff 
of the department. The district visited is carefully 
chosen with a view to offering the students the best 
possible opportunities for observation, and the method 
in general is to first spend ten days or a fortnight in one 
particular mine or works, thus familiarizing the stu- 
dents with the plant and making them quite at home 
in it. The remainder of the period is then spent in 
visiting other works, one or two days being given to 
each and the differences in method, etc., noted and 
studied. 

During these excursions, which are ordinarily carried 
out in a private car chartered for the purpose, students 
and staff live together, and informal lectures and dis- 
cussions are held whenever practicable, in order to 
call the attention of the men to the salient points of 
interest. 

While this class work is going on arrangements arc 
made with the managers of the works visited to take 
on individual students for the remainder of the summer 
as workmen. In this way it has always proved pos- 
sible to provide employment for all men who have 
not already secured engagements for the summer, and 
at the end of the field school the class disbands, not to 
play for three months, but to go to remunerative in- 
dividual work. 

On the return to the University in the autumn the 
detailed technical and laboratory work already re- 
ferred to is seriously begun.* Certain typical opera- 
tions are performed by the whole class such as a stamp 
mill run, the concentration of a lead or copper ore, and 
a short campaign with a copper or lead blast furnace, 
by the whole class, but the main work of the succeeding 
six months is individual and each man is encouraged 
to take up the same investigation which is especially 
interesting to him, such as the concentration of the 
ore from some mine in which he hopes to obtain em- 
ployment, or the smelting of a particular material, etc. 
This individual work, whatever it is, is under the eye 
of competent instructors, and assistance is given when 
needed, at the same time and when possible in the same 
connection, he is required to design a works and to 
l^rcpare approximate specifications and estimates as 
already outlined. 

In a recent paper by Dr. Stansfieldf the method of 



* In the .ii)i)endix will he found a copy of the instructions 
Riven to students at the beginning of their elementary work. 
The more special advanced work is similarly covered wherever 
possible by instruction ])apers which need not be repeated here. 

1 Can. Min. Inst., Vol. IX, 0906. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



115 



laboratory teaching in Metallurg}' is admirably set 
forth in detail. The method employed in the Mining 
and Ore Dressing Laboratories is so similar that it 
need not be more fully described here. 
H- The University course thus closes with a year of work 
as practical as possible, yet so laid out and directed 
as to be theoretical as well. The student is thus pre- 
pared to go out into his profession. His education is 



however but half over, and if he wishes to achieve 
high success in the end, he must content himself with 
a subordinate post for many years, and work hard and 
patiently to master the details of his special business, 
to learn to command men and to know himself. 

An appendix to this paper, entitled "Laboratory 
Notes on Trial Runs in Ore Dressing," has been 
omitted owing to lack of space. 





o 
2 



S 



u 
c 

o 
o 

E 
be 
_c 

a 
E 



Si 




Fig. 3. — Jigs and Feeder, Trommel and Drying Table, N'os. 20, 15, iq, 47. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 




Fig. 4. — Batteries, Classifiers, and Tables, Nos. 8, 11, 37a, 25, 31, 36, 3?. 




Fig. 7. — Electric Light and Power Station, Engineering Department. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



119 




120 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



KEY TO FLOOR PLAN OF McGILL MINING LABORATORIES. 



Orb Dressing Dept. 24. 

25. 

1. Comet Crusher. 26. 

2. Dod^e Crusher. 27. 

3. Ball Mill. 28. 

4. Sample Grinrler. 29, 

5. Roller Jaw Crusher. .30. 

6. Hydraulic Lift. .31. 

7. Bridgman Sampler. 32, 

8. Five Stamp Battery, 600 Ib.q. 33, 

9. Two Stamp Battery, 1,000 lbs. 34. 

10. Steam Stamp . 3r>. 

11. Huntington Mill. 36. 

12. Crushing Rolls. 37. 

13. Suspended Challenge Feeder. 37i 

14. Challenge Feeder, Portable. 38, 

15. TuUoch Feeder, Portable. .39, 

16. Blake Crusher. 40, 

17. Shaking Screens. 41, 

18. Shaking Screens. 42. 

19. Trommel, with 3 fields. 43. 

20. Large Jig. 2 comp. 44. 

21. Large Jig, 4 comp. 45. 

22. Three small Jigs, 2 comp. 46, 

23. Three Vezin Jigs. 1 comp. 47. 



Spitzkasten, 4 comp. 
Brown Sizer, 3 comp. 
Three Large Cone Classifiers. 
Three small Cone Classifiers. 
Pointed Box Settler. 
Three Brass Tube Classifiers. 
Seven Glass Tube Classifiers. 
Wilfley Table. 
Bartlett Table. 
Bartlett Slime Table. 
Small Riffled Table. 
Small Riffled Table. 
Evans Buddie. 
Frue Vanner. 
1 Battery Pl^es, 
Battery Plates, 
Battery Plates, sm 
Amalgamation Pan, 
Settler. 

Six Am.ilgamation Pans, small. 
Wetherill Magnetic Separator. 
Heberli Magnetic Separator. 
Centrifugal Separator. 
Pneumatic Jig. 

Steam Jacketed Drying Tal)le. 



Large, 
medium. 



large. 



48. Steam Jacketed Drying Table. 

49. Cyanide Plant. 
r-'O. Elmore Plant. 

Metallurgicai> Dei'T. 

00. Brueckner Roaster. 

61. Hand Roaster. 

62. Blast Furnace, water jacketed. 

63. Fore-hearth. 

64. Cupellation Furnace. 

65. Wind Furnace. 

66. Forge. 

67. Gas Muffle. 

6S. Gas Furnace Table, v 

69. Electric Fvirnace Table. 

70. Chlorination Barrel. 

71 . Power Saw. 
7i. Grindstone. 

73. Drop Test. 

74. Electrolytic Table. 

75. Power l>ift. 

76. Iron Table. 

77. Polishing .Api)aratus. 
7«. Small Blower. 

79. Experimental Open HearMh Furnace. 



80. 
81. 
82. 
83. 
84. 
85. 
86. 
87. 
88. 
89. 
90. 



Recording Pyrometer. 

Soft Coal Muffle. 

Six Wind Furnaces. 

Six Muffle I-'urnaces. 

Three Gas Muffle Furnaces. 



Draft Cupboard. 
-Seven Wfjrking 
Bucking Hoard. 
Bullion Rolls. 
Root Blower. 
Hydraulic Press. 



Bencheu. 



Power, Ere. 

100. l.')-H.P. Motor. 

101. 1.5-H.P. Motor. 

102. 1.5-H.P. Motor. 

103. 10-H.P. Motor. 

104. 2-H.P. Motor. 

105. 2-H.P. Motor. 
100. 2-H.P. Motor. 

107. 2-H.P. Motor. 

108. 1-H.P. Motor. 

109. ''-H. P. Motor. 

110. Ventilation Fan. 



45 «4 

0 0 



0 



9 Qp^p s 

^ ^EE] 



o 

O «7 
O 



Mining 

© © © 
La boratory 




Department of Mininq 
AND Metallurgy. 




FIG. 12. — Floor Plans of Department of Mining and Metallurgy, McGill University. 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



121 



THE TEACHING OF METALLURGY IN COLLEGE 
LABORATORIES, AND A DESCRIPTION OF 
THE EQUIPMENT AND USES OF THE 
METALLURGICAL LABORATORIES 
AT McGILL. 

By Dr. A. Stansfield, Montreal, 

In writing an account of the Metallurgical Labora- 
tories of McGill University, it became evident that a 
broader subject, the teaching of Metallurgy in college 
laboratories, its uses and its limitations, should first 
be considered. A discussion of the subject according- 
ly forms the introduction to this paper. 

Metallurgical laboratory teaching has not yet reached 
any standard pattern. The widest divergence of 
opinions exists with regard not only to the scope of 
such teaching but even as to whether any metallurgy 
worthy of the name can be taught at all in the college 
laboratory. 

A recent paper by H. C. Jenkins,* on "The Equip- 
ment of laboratories for advanced teaching and research 
in the Mineral Industries", produced such a crop of 
discussion in the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, 
in London, that it would be hard to find anything to 
add to what was said of written on that occasion. 

Without raising the wider question, whether metal- 
lurgical laboratory teaching is worth doing at all, it 
will be advisable to indicate the uses of such labora- 
tories in metallurgical teaching. 

Students on this continent have very great facilities 
for obtaining practical experience in smelters and me- 
tallurgical works both during the annual summer 
schools that are held in connection with most of our 
mining schools, and by taking subordinate positions 
in such works during the long summer vacation. It 
is therefore unnecessary to attempt in the laboratory 
to instruct the student in the practical operations of 
roasting or smelting which he can learn so much more 
easily and perfectly in the smelter. There are how- 
ever many parts of a metallurgist's education that 
can be more easily gained in the laboratory than at 
the smelter. 

The metallurgical laboratories of a university have 
several distinct uses, all of which, however, should con- 
duce to the education of the student, and these uses 
may be outlined as follows: — 

1. The use of furnaces and other appliances to illus- 
traie the lectures. — This is particularly useful in lecturing 
to junior students who have not yet visited metallur- 
gical works. 

For such students the laboratory furnaces, if on a 
reasonable large scale, tend to give concrete ideas of 
the real furnaces, and also enable some metallurgical 
principles, for example the principles involved in 
firing with hard or soft coal, coke, gas or oil to be pre- 
sented vividly. 

2. The teaching of fire assaying. — This, although 
forming a part of the teaching in metallurgical labora- 
tories, will not be considered in this paper. 

3. The use of metallurgical measuring instruments. — 
The pyrometer for measuring high temperatures, 
the calorimeter for measuring the calorific power of 
fuels, and the microscope for the examination of 
steel and other metals are all instruments whose use 
should be acquired by the metallurgical student. 

4. Properties of metals, fuels, and refractory materials. 
—The more important mechanical, physical and 
chemical properties of the common metals, alloys, 

*Trans. Inst. Mining and Metallurgy, London, Vol. XIII. 



fuels, refractory materials and fluxes can be easily 
learnt with the aid of simple furnaces and appliances 
in the laboratory, and knowledge so gained is far more 
useful than if acquired from books. 

5. Study of metallurgical reactions. — The reactions 
that are at the root of mnny metallurgical operations 
can be studied very perfectly in the laboratory, with 
the aid of simple and inexpensive appliances. Thus 
the roasting of an ore can be exactly studied, and the 
chemical changes that take place, and the tempera- 
ture necessary for each stage of the process can be 
determined. Prof. Howe* shows how such work can 
be carried out by a class of students, but in many 
cases the object of such experiments would be to im- 
prove commercial practice in certain particulars, and 
should be taken as an advanced student's thesis or 
even as research work by a member of the teaching 
staff. 

6. Large furnace runs. — In laboratories provided 
with large scale furnaces for roasting or smelting, it 
is usual to have occasional runs of such furnaces. The 
lecturer explains beforehand the particular problem 
that is to be met and the calculations necessary for 
making up a smelting charge. The students carry out 
as far as possible the operations during the run, and 
after the clean up, the result of the run is presented 
to the class and compared with the results predicted 
and with the results that would be obtained in actual 
practice. 

When time permits, it is desirable that the students 
should themselves make the chemical analyses before 
and after the run, and the sampling of the materials 
composing the charge and of the products of the run 
affords valuable experience. The opportunity may 
also be taken to sample and analyse the furnace gases, 
determine the furnace temperatures, measure the 
amount of air entering the furnace, and the amount and 
rise of temperature of the jacket water in the case of 
a blast furnace campaign. 

Taken in this way a small furnace run has an educa- 
tional value quite apart from the practical experience 
gained by the student, and is not open to the criticism 
of being merely a bad imitation of works practice. 

7. Student's theses.— One of the most important 
uses of metallurgical or ore dressing laboratories is 

or enabling advanced students to attempt to solve 
some definite problem in connection, for example, 
with the treatment of an ore. A large number of 
such problems can be worked out satisfactorily on 
quite a small scale, and then if time permits can be 
repeated on as large a scale as the laboratory affords, 
thus enabling the effect of scale to be quantitatively 
determined. 

Work of this character tends to throw the students 
largely on their own resources, and affords extremely 
valuable training, teaching precise experimental me- 
thods, careful observation and correct reasoning from 
the results of experiments; it also encourages initiative 
in devising new methods. 

8. Use of laboratories by teaching staff. — Apart from 
direct use by the students, the laboratories are useful 
to the stafT; their use tends to prevent the teaching 
becommg too academic in character. Each member 
of the staff should have some research, either on theo- 
retical or practical lines. Outside testing or experi- 
mental work should be undertaken to keep the staff 
in touch with technical and commercial requirements. 



*H. M. Howe, "Metallurgical Laboratory Notes." In the 
introduction to this work he discusses the teaching of metalluro-y 
and insists that principles rather than practice should be taught 
n the College laboratory. 



122 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



Any information directly gained in this way is far 
more valuable than that obtained at second hand or 
from books. 

Having outHned some of the uses of a metallurgical 
laboratory one can the better consider the actual 
equipment and how far it comes up to the require- 
ments already outlined. 

The laboratories at McGill consist of a furnace 
room 60 ft. by 38 ft. and 18 ft. high, a smaller room 
for fire assaying 54 ft. by 24 ft. and smaller rooms 
for balances, chemical and photographic work, micros- 
copy and pyrometry. 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF EQUIPMENT. 

The main laboratory contains a water jacket I)last 
furnace with interchangeable crucibles for smelting 
either lead or copper ores, a reverberatory roasting 
furnace, a Bruckner roaster, a cupellation furnace, 
and a chlorination barrel. 

These appliances are on a relatively large scale, and 
will be described later in detail. 

There is also a large, 17 inch, crucible furnace pro- 
vided with forced draft, a large gas muffle furnace 
or forge, a brick topped table with gas and air connec- 
tions for experimental gas furnace work, another 
brick topped table equipped for electric furnace work. 
A table with terminals for low voltage current for 
electrolytic experiments and a model open hearth 
regenerative gas furnace. 

The fire assaying room contains a number of wind 
furnaces and muffle furnaces for coke, soft coal, oil 
and gas which will not be considered in the present 
paper. 

The several furnaces may now be considered in 
detail with the uses to which they can be put. 

Bruckner roasting furnace. — The rotating drum has 
an external diameter of 2 ft. 8 inches, and a length 
of 5 feet, and is lined with 4^ inches of fire brick. It 
is fired by means of soft coal or wood in a movable 
firebox. The charge of ore used is about 250 lbs. 

Reverberatory roasting furnace.-^A view of this is 
given in Fig. 7b. The hearth measures 6 ft. by 14 ft. 
internally, and will take about 1,500 lbs. of ore. 

There are three working doors on each side of the 
furnace. The flue descends at the end of the furnace 
and returns beneath the hearth constituting a dust 
chamber. 

The fire box was originally 4 ft. by 2 ft., but the 
consumption of coal has been greatly reduced and 
the efficiency of the furnace increased by reducing 
the fire box to 3 ft. by 1^ ft. and introducing a steam 
jet forced blast into the closed ash pit, thus turning 
the fire box into a gas producer. 

The chemical and physical changes that take place 
during the roasting of powdered ore can be studied 
fjuite as well if not better in a small gas fired muffle 
furnace, but the reverberatory furnace affords appro- 
ximate information with regard to the roasting of 
any particular ore on the large scale, and has much 
educational value in regard to the economical firing 
of such furnaces. One of the difficulties connected 
with the use of large reverberatory furnaces in the 
laboratory is the great length of time that must elapse 
before the furnace has become thoroughly heated. 

A large roasting furnace is sometiTties necessary in 
order to roast cjuantiticis of ore for subsecjuent smelting 
op(!rations. 

The stall or kiln roasting of lump ores of copper has 
been successfully carried out on a small scale in one 
of the wind furnaces. 

Water jacket blast /wrnacr. --This is circulai', having 



an internal diameter of 21 inches at the tuyeres, and 
33 inches at the top of the jacket. The height from 
tuyeres to charging door is 7 ft. 

There are 3 tuyeres of 2^ inches diameter, and the 
furnace is blown by a No. ^ Root's blower driven by 
a 15-h. p. electric motor. 

There are two crucibles both on wheels, the one 
for lead smelting containing a large well with the 
usual siphon tap for the lead, and spout for the slag. 
The copper crucible is much shallower, and originally 
the matte and slag were tapped periodically into slag 
pots where the matte settled by gravity and was se- 
parated from the slag when cold. The slag obtained 
in this way was never very clean, and experiments 
were made first with an internal crucible, tapping the 
slag and matte off at different levels; and finally by 
adding a fore-hearth in which the matte settled from 
the slag. The fore-hearth is 34" by 25" by 19" high 
externally, and is lined with Y' asbestos, 2^" of fire 
brick and 2" of brasque and covered with 3" fire clay 
tiles, as it was feared that a fore-hearth with so small 
a flow of slag and matte would be apt to freeze up. 
To further prevent loss of heat, the usual spout bet- 
ween furnace and fore-hearth is omitted, and the 
molten charge allowed to enter the fore-hearth through 
a covered channel below the level of the slag in the 
fore-hearth. It is in fact the Herreshoff fore-hearth, 
but without any water cooling. 

As a further precaution a gas blowpipe is arranged 
so that a flame could be introduced between the sur- 
face of the slag and the tile cover if any signs of freezing 
are observed. 

A granulating apparatus is arranged to deal with 
the slag and works satisfactorily. The general arrange- 
ment is shown in Figs. 3 and 4. The slag from the 
fore-hearth is very much cleaner than has previously 
been obtained. 

The blast furnace can easily be blown in, run for 
two or three hours, and blown out during the student's 
working day, the crucible and fore-hearth having 
been heated up previously; but the work of cleaning 
up and preparing for the next run is very considerable. 

During the run, in addition to weighing and charging 
the ore, fluxes and coke and to manipulating the mol- 
ten slag and matte, the students are required to de- 
termine the volume and temperature of the jacket 
water, the speed of the blower, pressure of blast, con- 
dition of furnace at the tuyeres, and on top of the 
charge, rate of flow of slag, and of granulating water, 
etc., and the data so obtained are worked up and 
form the subject matter of a subsequent lecture after 
the necessary analyses have been made. 

Having obtained satisfactory slag settling facilities, 
the next problem to be attacked was that of pyritic 
smelting, and the first experiment made in that direc- 
tion met with a reasonable degree of success, the slag 
and matte analyses agreeing very closely with the pre- 
dicted values and interesting information was obtained 
from the gas analyses. 

The author considers that these furnace runs very 
greatly increase the value of the lectures on this branch 
of the subject. 

In running a blast furnace, even so small as the one 
at McGill, it is noticeable that the students are apt 
to be occupied by the actual operations of weighing, 
charging, tapping, etc., to such an extent that they are 
likely to lose the educational value of many of the 
phenomena to be observed. As it is not intended 
to train the students as expert weighers, chargers or 
tappers this preoccupation with the actual operation is 
apt to detract from the educational value of the run, 
and as far as the investigation of the principles of 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



123 



smelting goes a furnace on even smaller lines would 
answer every purpose, and would have the additional 
advantages that less ore and fuel would be needed, 
that the students could be left more entirely to their 
own devices in running the furnace, and that they 
would be able unaided to clean up the products of 
the run and make out balance sheets. 

The author has on two occasions built and operated 
with students small brick furnaces 9" sq. inside, and 
has smelted in each a few hundred pounds of copper 
ores without serious difficulty. As so small a fur- 
nace would inevitably freeze up if it were attempted 
to tap the products. A small fore-hearth was added 
and the molten products were kept hot by a flame 
issuing from the crucible of the furnace. 

Working on a small scale, it is usually impossible 
in furnace work to imitate both the arrangements 
and the results of large scale operations. One may 
build and operate a model furnace, but it will not 
usually give normal results. To obtain good con- 
ditions, it is usually necessary to depart widely from 
the adopted type of furnace — such changes being due 
mainly to the very much greater loss of h at that 
occurs on the small scale. 

In metallurgical laboratory teaching, when this 
alternative offers, the author would not recommend 
in general that the works pattern should be followed, 
but that an entirely new furnace should be designed 
that will enable the principles to be experimented 
with and demonstrated, and have perhaps a few- 
large scale appliances that can be at once models and 
working furnaces. 

English Cupellation furnaces. — This furnace was 
originally installed as the smallest furnace that could 
be obtained ready made that would serve as a rever- 
beratory smelting furnace. It is obvious that a me- 
tallurgical laboratory would not often have enough 
argentiferous lead to need the use of a 48" by 30" 
test. The furnace has been used for smelting lead 
ores and it is intended to remodel it with a view to 
the regular smelting of either lead or copper ores. 
In this, as in the roaster furnace, a steam jet forced 
draft has been added with great advantage. 

Crucible furnace. — A crucible furnace 17" sq. has 
been provided with forced blast, and it is easy 'in this 
furnace to melt steel in crucibles or to test the fusi- 
biUty of refractory materials. 

The blast for the blast furnace and for the crucible 
furnace is furnished by a No. ^ Root's blower driven 
by 15 h.p. motor. For small gas furnace work a 1 
h.p. blower giving up to 1 lb. pressure has been added 
to avoid running the large blower and motor. 

Gas furnaces. — For metallurgical teaching and re- 
search purposes, the ordinary city gas affords an ideal 
heating agent for many purposes, and as Prof. Howe 
very clearly points out, it is better in general to use 
a fuel that will afford constant, easily regulated and 
definite conditions of temperature and of atmos- 
phere in which to study definite metallurgical pro- 
blerns, than to introduce at the same time the diffi- 
culties connected with the use of coal or other solid 
fuel. 

A 1 h.p. high pressure blower has recently been 
installed and piped to different parts of the laboratory 
and with the aid of some home made blow pipes of 
various sizes and a few fire bricks it is easy to cons- 
truct small furnaces as occasion arises. 

A brick topped table (Figure 3) provided with a 
hood and connections for gas and air is specially con- 
venient for this class of work, while a combined forge 
and muffle furnace obtained from the American Gas 
Furnace Company has proved very convenient for 



roasting small quantities of ore, for fire assaying and 
for researches in which a number of bars of steel 
were heated nearly to their melting temperature in 
order to ascertain the conditions under which steel 
became "burnt" and the true nature of the so-called 
burning. 

Those who have designed model furnaces may be 
interested to hear of a model open hearth furnace 
constructed at McGill. It was built as a model on 
the 1 inch to the foot scale of a 50 ton tilting open 
hearth furnace, with the exception that coal gas was 
used and that chequers were provided only for the 
air. Without going into detail, it may be said that 
using an amount of gas proportionately, about equal 
in heat value to that used in the large furnace, the 
chequers did not have nearly the effect that was ex- 
pected, and it was found that on account of the re- 
latively larger area of the walls of the small scale 
furnace, and the actually smaller thickness of the 
walls the loss of heat was so great that the chequers 
never became thoroughly heated. 

Using a larger supply of gas the supply of pre- 
heated air was inadequate to burn it, and it became 
ob vious that for small scale gas furnaces the gas blow 
pipe with air preferably preheated in a pipe stove 
was decidedly more efficient, and that in order to ex- 
hibit the effect of chequers in preheating air the 
furnace would have to be built larger, using producer 
gas, or else the most extreme care should be taken 
to avoid loss of heat by the use of thick walls contain- 
ing very poorly conducted layers, such as asbestos 
pulp. 

It is intended to construct a small gas producer 
with a view to illustrate details in the production and 
uses of gaseous fuel. 

Electric furnaces. — A brick topped table (Fig. 2) 
has recently been constructed to which not only the 
electric current but also gas, air and water has been 
led. The gas and air being intended as a substitute 
for the more costly electric power for the drying and 
preliminary heating of certain of the electric furnaces; 
while water is sometimes needed for cooUng the ter- 
minals and metal casings of furnaces. 

Many varieties of electric furnace have been ex- 
perimented with, but owing to the relatively high 
voltage and low current available, the arc furnaces 
have heen more generally useful. The horizontal 
arc furnace of Moissan has been found especially 
useful in melting metals for demonstrational pur- 
poses. The vertical arc furnace is also useful for 
melting metals and for reducing metals from their 
ores. The production of calcium carbide in this 
form of furnace has been found to be a suitable ex- 
ercise for class purposes. 

For the electrical smelting of ores, furnaces of the 
Heroult type have been used in which two vertical 
carbons dip into the furnace and arcs are formed 
between these and the charge. Resistance furnaces 
are more satisfactory for many purposes than arc 
furnaces, but the necessity of using current at 110 
volts renders small resistance furnaces exceedingly 
wasteful of power. 

The power available for electric furnace work is 
about 200 amperes of direct current at 110 volts, and 
while this is sufficient to exhibit the principles of 
electric heating and to enable many experimental 
points to be determined, it is inadequate for carry- 
ing out electric smelting even on the smallest satis- 
factory scale, especially when low resistance furnaces 
have to be used. It is hoped that a sufficient supply 
of alternating current at 110 volts and a transformer 
for reducing to lower voltages will be provided to enable 



124 



THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



some of the newer processes to be worked out on a 
scale that would afford information to intending 
manufacturers, and training for students who wish 
to specialize in electro-metallurgy. 

Microscopy. — The outfit consists of cutting and 
polishing machinery for preparing the specimens of 
steel or alloy, a special microscope for examining the 
specimens and a long photographic camera for re- 
cording the microscopic structures so revealed. 

Pyromctry. — A thermo-electric pyrometer is usual- 
ly employed for measuring temperatures in the labo- 
ratory. This is connected to a galvanometer which 
indicates the temperature, and a photographic appa- 
ratus enables continuous records of temperature to 
be obtained. Several pyrometers of the Callendar 
type are also available for use. 

Calorimctry. — A Mahler bomb calorimeter is vised 
for determining the calorific power of fuel. 

Analytical ivork and fire assaying. — The students 
are expected to have attained to a reasonable degree 
of proficiency in these subjects l)efore commencing 
their final year's work, and the laboratory work in 



that year is so arrainged as to involve some quanti- 
tative chemistry and fire assaying, thus enabling the 
students to make use of the knowledge they have 
gained in these methods. The necessity for a rea- 
sona])le degree of speed and reliability in their work 
is impressed upon them in this way, and they become 
more ready to carry out such work at short notice. 

Electrolysis. — A table has been fitted up for elec- 
trolytic work, being provided with a 1 h.p. 10 volt 
dynamo driven by a 1 h.p. motor, a small storage 
battci'y has been added to enable experiments to be 
left running over night. 

Within the limits of this paper it has been impossible 
to do more than hint at most of the experiments 
that have been made or can easily be carried out in 
these laboratories; the limiting consideration is usual- 
ly the short time at the disposal of the student rather 
than any limitations of the laboratory. Never- 
theless the author is only too painfully aware of de- 
ficiencies in the e<juipment, and endeavors as time and 
money will permit to raise the standard both of the 
laboratories and the work that is done in them. 




Fig. I. - Macdoiiald Chemistr}' and Mining- Building, McGill University. 




Fic. 5. — Walcr Jacket Hlasl Furnace and Fore Hoartli, Nos. 62, 63. 



128 THE CANADIAN MINING REVIEW. 



MR. N. ]). DARU. 

Mr. Naiiabhai IJayabhai Daru, B. Sc., B. A., of 
Bombay, B. Sc. in engineering and metallurgy, Lon- 
don, an Associate of the Royal School of Mines and 
Barrister at Law, is at present in Ottawa, being an 
attache of the Indian Government to the Geological 




Survey of Canada. Mr. Daru is a native of Daru- 
Falia Surat, India, and has been sent to Canada by 
the Indian Government to study the methods em- 
ployed in mining in this country. He is under ins- 
instructions to make a thorough of this subject, and 
to remain in the Dominion for two years, during 
which time he will visit the principal mining centres. 
Mr. Daru has already made many friends in Canada, 
especially among the mining fraternity. 



ECONOMICAL COAL MINING. 

(Jne of the most successful and interesting electric coal 
minino; equipments is found at the Tropic Mining Company's 
mine located on the Zanesville & Western R.R. at Deaverton, 
Morgan County, Ohio. The Tropic Mining Co., here operate 
in^the No. 6 seam, which has an average thickness of 3' — 8" the 
coal being of very excellent quality, and is known on the market 
as the "Celebrated Tropic Coal." 

The average daily output of the mine is about 1,400 tons 
run of mine coal in 8 hours. In order to reduce the cost of mining 
and decrease the percentage of "slack", nearly all the mining 
is done by chain machines. The Tropic Mining Co., have in- 
stalled an electric plant which furnishes power to the mining 
machine, electric locomotive and stationary motors. The power 
plant consists of two 100 K.W.-2.'50 volt direct current, belted 
generators, built by the .Jeffrey Mfg. Co., of Columbus, Ohio, 
ea(^h generator being dri\'en by a 16" x G" McEwen Engine, 
'{'he .switchboanl is of the slceieton type and eciuipped. with 
- necessary in.struinents and switches for controlling the dynamos. 
Steam is supplied by a battery of two 72" x 18' Xtlas boilers 
equipped with the necessary apnaratus for supplying feed water 
to I he boilfu-s. In the powei' liouse is al.so installed a double 
reversilile 10" x 12" hoisting (Migine with two '.V 6" drums, 
which furnishes power for IIk^ rojM' haulage installed for handling 
(he cars on the sloyw'. The Uwigth of i\w ropi) haulage is about 
1,200 feet. th(^ nia-xiinuni grade being l.'jper (;ent. Tw(;n(,y cars 
is the. average nuiribcr hauled per trip, the einpty cars being 
returned down the slope i)y gravity. The entries are driven Hi 
feet wid(! with an average height of A' (V. The rooms are 
(li-ivcn to a (l<^j)th of 2W leet and a, v\i(llh of :{() feet (he room 



necks being 12 feet wide. There Is at present installed 9 electric 
undercutting mining machines of the chain type. Eight of the 
machines were furnished by the .Jeffrey Mfg. Co., of Columbus, 
Ohio, and are of their well known Cla.ss 17-A. machines, making 
an undercut of fi feet in depth and 41 inches in width. The 
average number of runs per day of eight hours in 40 runs and 
the maximum runs each machine is sixty. The mining ma- 
chines are ef|uipped with self-propelling arranirement by which 
(hey can readily be moved from one point in the mine to another 
without delays. 

On accoimt of the thin vein 3' 8" only very small mules or 
ponies can be used for gathering the cars from the face work- 
ings. The weight of the mules employed is between .500 and 
600 lbs., the maximum height of the mules being .52". The coal 
is gathered to four different partings by 14 nuiles and 14 driv- 
ers, each mule with driver gathering on an average of about 120 
cars per day. This includes coal, slate and other materials 
which are taken out of the mine. 

Each driver takes care of about 14 rooms and at present 
the average length of the mule haulage is 900 feet. To haul 
the mine cars from the partings to the bottom of the slope, a 
six ton Jeffrey standard type electric locomotive is employed. 
The locomotive averages about 60 trips per day of eight hours 
and handles between 1,200 to 1,350 cars per day. The average 
length of haul from the four partings is about 1,200 feet, there 
being but very slight grades against the "loads" the maximum 
being about 2 per cent, and this only for a short distance. 

The locomotive haulage is laid with 30-lbs. steel rails, but 
in the rooms the weight of the rails is 16 lbs. per yard. The 
locomotive when delivering the loaded cars to the bottom of 
the .slope has to make a "flying switch" for a side track, and as 
portion of the track on which the loaded cars are delivered is on 
a grade, it is necessary for the locomotive to pass over the 
switch at full speed in order to give the loaded trip enough mo- 
mentum to clear the switch at the side track. The trip rider 
uncouples the cars and the switch is thrown automatically by 
the locomotive as it passes. The locomotive handles from 1